Life Magazine Gives Us A Look Back At The Fashionable Teenagers Of The 1960’s

"Corona del Mar High School students Kim Robertson, Pat Auvenshine and Pam Pepin wear 'hippie' fashions, 1969."

“Corona del Mar High School students Kim Robertson, Pat Auvenshine and Pam Pepin wear ‘hippie’ fashions, 1969.”

"Southern California high school students, 1969."

“Southern California high school students, 1969.”

"High school teacher Sandy Brockman wears a bold print dress, 1969."

“High school teacher Sandy Brockman wears a bold print dress, 1969.”

"High school fashions, 1969."

“High school fashions, 1969.”

In fashion, what goes around comes around. What was stylish 20, 30, even more than 40 years ago can still make a comeback and look en vogue. LIFE magazine documented the 1969 trends of American youth culture, and many traces of them are still worn today.

Hippies and disco culture shaped the way people dressed themselves, and these fashions were considered “counter culture” at the time. Fringed vests, bell-bottom jeans, and miniskirts were part of the new trends and attitude towards expressing yourself through clothing. “The latest rule in girls’ high school fashion,” LIFE magazine wrote in 1969, “is that there isn’t any.”

While the same could be said today, these sartorial choices came from a much different place. The world was seeing a cultural transformation and just getting smaller with the growth of global telecommunication networks. The television become a thing in every household. Liv Combe of LIFE also explains, “The vast and near-visionary national highway system had spread across the country in the post-World War II years; more households than ever owned a car (or two); and for the first time, plane travel was becoming a viable option for many American families.

Denim jumpers, Peter Pan collars, and strappy sandals are all things popular back then which are still seen today. They might’ve seemed strange back then, but as with most things, counter culture eventually goes mainstream. With some of these photos, it might take you a moment to realize they aren’t from 2015. (Via Demilked and Time)

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Brutal Photographs Of Teen Boxers Before And After Fights

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For his powerful series 141 Boxers, photographer Nicolai Howalt shoots young amateur boxers in Denmark before and after their first brutal fight. The artist, known in part for his elegant images of car wrecks, once again finds an eerie beauty in violence, capturing sweaty faces sprinkled in fresh blood. On the left, his subjects present their game faces, poised in a moment of calm determination prior to the battle; on the right, the violence and competition has ended, leaving their faces bruised and swollen.

For these teenage athletes, the first foray into the ring presents itself as a rite of passage out of childhood and into manhood. Afterwards, they are irrevocably changed, as if all of puberty were condensed into a single test of machismo. As viewers, we might be unsettled to see these round, blushingly cheeks marked by punches; though outwardly baby-faced, Howalt’s subjects possess a knowingness and understanding of aggression that transcends their youth. Thrust into the environment of the controversial sport, these pimpled, wide-eyed adolescents are aglow with their own glistening sweat and an uncomfortable sense of adult virility.

Arranged neatly in a grid as they are in gallery installations, Howalt’s violent images are paradoxically sterile. Set against a pale gray background, his subjects seem restrained in a way that contradicts the nature of their sport. Many of the photographs look like clean mugshots pinned cleanly and simply on a wall; the young boxers are at the mercy of our judgement. Do we condemn or celebrate this ruthless sport? Take a look. (via Agonistica)

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