Jay Mohler Creates Fantastic Eyes Of God Weavings In Brilliant Colors

Jay Mohler - Weaved YarnJay Mohler - Weaved YarnJay Mohler - Weaved Yarn

Jay Mohler creates intricate, textile designs, weaving different colored yarns to create brilliant Mandalas. His geometric patterns create Ojos de Dios, Spanish for eyes of God, that are either eight sided of twelve sides, spanning up to over a foot. Mohler began hand-making his Ojos de Dios over 40 years ago, after he traveled to Guadalajara, Mexico in 1965. At a marketplace there is where he first saw these fantastic, small-scale weavings. He was extremely impressed by the complex patterns and how often they would be created from a single strand of yarn, crossing and looping over the wooden sticks that hold it all together. The beautiful Ojos de Dios can be found in many cultures, traditionally in Native American and Mexican as well as Tibetan, where they can hold spiritual elements. They are also a symbol of a physical eye, as the designs of the weavings revolve around the center “eye.”

Based out of North Caroline, Jay Mohler uses wool yarn in all types of colors, including metallics, to carefully weave his vibrant creations. You can buy an Ojos de Dios for your own on his Etsy page, where you can also order custom made patterns and even buy a DIY kit to make your own. Make sure to check out more of his weavings to see the scale and size of his many creations. (via The Jealous Curator)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

David Samuel Stern Physically Weaves Portraits Together, Showing Two Different Sides Of His Subjects

David Samuel Stern - Woven Photographic Portrait David Samuel Stern - Woven Photographic Portrait

Brooklyn based artist David Samuel Stern takes still photographs, and fuses them together so that they appear to be in motion. He begins by taking two portraits of the same person, and then carefully and meticulously cuts them apart before physically weaving them back into one another. This not only creates amazing texture and an interesting checkered pattern, but combines physical features until the composition.

become a hybrid of two faces. With a light and airy palette, these breathtaking photographic prints become ghosts of themselves, two versions or the same person. Two different emotions are often present, creating an interesting dichotomy of the internal character. We are seeing two sides of the subjects, as the weaving alters and skews our perspective. Stern’s highly original technique abstracts the portraits so that they seem to be caught in mid motion. Both original images become blurred after they are combines by weaving. The once crisp photographic prints are transformed by their alteration, creating a painterly atmosphere. David Samuel Stern’s method is simple yet powerful, exposing two sides of each of his subjects. However, the abstraction present in his work also hides elements and details of the portraits as well.

You can see David Samuel Stern’s mesmerizing, photographic work on view at the BAM Harvey Theater in New York City from September 16 through December 20th.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Jenine Shereos’ Creates Beautifully Intricate Spiderwebs Out Of Lace

shereos-installation1

shereos-installation2

shereos-installation4

shereos-installation5

Boston-based artist Jenine Shereos who we’ve featured in the past for her amazing series of leaves made from human hair.  her amazing series of leaf forms made from human hair. Her more recent work revisits the idea of human-manipulated nature with “De/constructed Lace,” a site-specific installation series of knit-lace that mimics spiderwebs.

In Marnay-Sur-Seine, France she draped the knit threads in windows and doorways, looking like massive, delicate spiderwebs, echoing the white lace curtains in many local homes. The works are not perfect, Charlotte’s Web creations, but looser, more organic forms. Shereos says on her website:

“This installation of knit-lace is suspended in a state of unraveling. The process of its making and unmaking are one and the same.”

In Boston, she worked with black thread and crystals, allowing her web-like art to cast filigreed shadows on the wall amid flickering rainbows from the hanging crystal. The webs are more ominous in black, connecting to walls and windows and floor with fine strands.

“Some of these site-specific works are installed for a period of weeks for viewers to interact with, and others function as a sort of ephemeral, private performance existing afterwards in documentation. Oftentimes, collaborations intended or unintended arise within the environment; a spider spins its delicate webs from the white strands of thread suspended in an unraveling knit curtain, fibrous fragments of seaweed become embedded within a structure of knit fibers, or an array of rainbows flicker amidst white walls and black curtains.”

By co-opting the aesthetics of the natural world, Shereos creates a conscious interaction with the structure of the landscape or the architecture surrounding her art, uniting real and surreal, natural and constructed, fluidity and stillness.

Currently Trending

Adrian Esparza Transforms Mexican Serape Blankets Into Intricate Geometric Thread Installations

esparzathread12

esparzathread17

esparzathread5

 

Adrian Esparza

Texas-based artist Adrian Esparza uses nails and the thread from Mexican sarape blankets to weave colorful geometric patterns. Growing up in El Paso, Esparza encountered these blankets on a daily basis. Using his background as a painter, Esparza observed that the blankets contained painterly qualities that he sought to deconstruct. The result is an unraveling of a Mexican cultural symbol into a new form, a multi-dimensional landscape of color and shape. Esparza’s deconstruction and transformation of this cultural symbol reflects the displacement of identity that many Mexican-Americans experience as a result of migration. The wall pieces Esparza constructs from the serapes, though completely transformed, recall macrame and other handcrafts from the artist’s culture. Through his work, Esparza reinvents the ordinary and asks the viewer to embrace the potential for creative transformation that can be found in the familiar and the mundane.

Esparza’s work – titled “Wake and Wonder” –  will be on view at Pérez Art Museum Miami as part of the exhibition, “Americana: Formalizing Craft,” until May 2015.(via design boom)

Currently Trending

Olek And Four Other Artists Redefine Fiber Art

Olek

Olek

Erin Riley

Erin Riley

Olga De Amaral

Olga De Amaral

Olek

Olek

Fiber Arts have a longstanding history rooted in craft and tradition.  Woven objects have tended to be functional or decorative, and often viewed more as the works of artisans, as opposed to artists.  In the twentieth century this has begun to shift more, and in the 21st century the practice of weaving and knitting has been reclaimed and turned on its head by a number of artists that are forward thinking and highly skilled in their “craft.”  Artists included here are: Olga de Amaral, Erin Riley, Olek, Ann Tilley and Andrea Sherrill Evans.  It is important to note that historically weaving has been viewed as women’s work.  All of the artists included in this post are women, yet appear to have adopted the practice of weaving and redefined it on their own terms, while becoming masters in the process.

Olek‘s work is an absolutely fantastical explosion of bright-textural fun.  Often taking her work outside the white walls of galleries and into the streets, Olek has taken fibers to a place most thought impossible.  Some of the works she has made recently include huge feats such as completely encasing the Wall Street Bull in neon crocheted and knitted camouflage pattern and re-adorning a whole locomotive in rainbow patterned softness- completely handwoven. Her work tends to encase and cover objects and people- creating whole installations, performance art costumes and beautiful sculptural objects in a sort of renegade demonstration of liberated punk-rock-quirk.

Currently Trending

Jason Hughes’ Creates Artwork From Shredded Dollar Bills

Jason Hughes - Dollar Bills Jason Hughes - Dollar BillsJason Hughes - Dollar Bills

Now that the US government is not longer shut down (at least for the time being…), it feels like an appropriate time to visit the work of Jason Hughes. For years, he has used money as his medium, literally. Hughes obtains dollar bills previously removed from circulation and shredded by the government. He takes the bills, weaving them together or applying them to panel. With both approaches, it is staggering to think about the amount of work, attention to detail, and time that goes into each piece.

Sometimes, Hughes will take the scraps and weave them together, while other times he will arrange them to form different icons like a heart, bullseye, and eye. The imagery has ties to American culture. For instance, the star inside of the circle is reminiscent of the classic Converse All Star shoes.

The process of Hughes’ work is as important as the outcome. The act of creating a piece explores ideas of labor, value, and worth. It highlights the disparity between skilled labor and industry in the United States. Jobs that are often tedious, like working in a factory, for instance, are very low on the pay scale. But, they make things we have work and keep our homes, buildings, and society running smoothly.  Another Day, Another Dollar (directly above) reconstructs the dollar bill, which seems to say that yes, another day is another dollar, but when you consider the amount of work that went into that single dollars, it isn’t enough.

By taking this shredded money, which was otherwise worthless before, Hughes assigns a new value by changing its context. Now, composed and presented as art, he creates something that is worth much more than the sum of its parts.

Currently Trending