Ye Chang’s Metamorphic Installation Of 10,000 Petri Dishes

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Chinese architect Ye Chang‘s Kong Shanshui/Empty Shanshui is a naturally transforming installation consisting of over 10,000 petri dishes. Part of the “Pavilion of China – Architecture China 2013” exhibition, which recently opened at the Palacio Quintanar in the Segovia, Spain, the piece has a unique, changing quality. The base of the installation consists of layers of white stones which fill the ancient palace’s courtyard, echoing peaceful, meditative gardens. On top of the stones are piles or gatherings of petri dishes, some ten thousand in total, stacked in various forms, resembling miniature hills, mountains and rock formations.

According to Sue Wang at Cafa Art Info, the installation transforms at different stages of the day, citing firsthand that, “…there is dew in the petri dishes in the morning; light is gentle in the morning and the glass is transparent; when there is direct sunlight at noon, the installation is entirely placed in the sun, strongly reflecting, which is in contrast to the dry surrounding environment, making people feel cool; the setting sun is blocked by the house in the evening, so the glass reflects the light from the sky, seen as backlit, it looks like the scales of a huge creature stranded on the beach, with rich tones; the whole glass hills is self-luminous at night, producing a transition effect changing from semi darkness to darkness.”  This daily, natural transformation of the installation not only is a quickly-viewable message of transition, but it’s meditative qualities also call to attention how both art and architecture can effect a viewer’s ability to feel at peace in a home, garden or museum experience.  (via myampgoesto11 and CAFA Art Info)

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