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Letha Wilson: Reclaim Drywall!



Fountain is a sculpture made by Letha Wilson using drywall and wood reclaimed from art gallery walls, and an artist’s studio walls. In this piece the form of a classical water fountain is invoked, typically present in a garden or entryway as a symbol of the utopian ideal. Walls and building materials previously used to house artworks, complete with paint stains and remnants of their past life, are re-newed into this functional water fountain. The drywall materials will gradually deteriorate away over the course of the exhibition as the paper and rock-based materials are worn down by constantly moving water. 


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[hu]Man vs. Machine



As his name hints, [hu]Man vs. Machine delivers work created with traditional materials in order to mimic what can be done with the computer. His work is very enjoyable and ranges from ink drawings to paintings to installations.


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Jon Owen

Picture 5We’ve been posting alot of amazing illustrators from the UK, and Jon Owen is yet another within this category. You can difinitely detect a common stylistic thread from piece to piece, yet, Jon also has a strength for mixing things up and keeping his work fresh. I’m personally fond of his limited color splashes & muted palette, which only increases my curiosity to explore the details of these narratives.

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El Gato Chimney Paints Symbolic Visions Of Fantasy Worlds Infused With Alchemy, Occultism, And Folklore

El Gato Chimney - Painting

“My Black Heart” (2014.) 100 x 71cm, watercolor and pencil on cotton paper.

El Gato Chimney - Painting

“Speak The Truth” (2014). 50 x 71 cm, watercolor and pencil on cotton paper.

El Gato Chimney - Painting

“L’offerta” (2014). 80 x 60 cm, acrylic on canvas.

El Gato Chimney - Painting

“The Catcher” (2014). 60 x 70 cm, acrylic on canvas.

El Gato Chimney is an Milan-based artist who paints imaginative and symbolic scenes that explore the dualisms and crossovers between good and evil, life and death. Populated with anthropomorphized animals, fire-breathing demons, and masked religious-type figures, Chimney’s work resembles the kind of metaphorical, fantastical visions you might imagine on a medieval tapestry, where every detail is interwoven with a hidden significance. Intensifying the scope of his art is the fact that his paintings syncretize spiritual traditions and practices from around world and throughout history, including alchemy, occultism, and folklore. Brimming with wit, insight, and imagination, Chimney’s work is a modern interpretation of ancient art and ongoing philosophic themes.

One of the most compelling aspects of Chimney’s symbol-filled imagery is the apparent moral ambiguity. The creatures inhabiting the vast, melancholic landscapes are unclear in their intentions, with their strange, chimerical bodies appearing both gentle and wicked. Many of them are preparing for abstract duals with one another, the reasons for which remain unknown. In a statement provided on Chimney’s Bio page, this confounding of good and evil, darkness and light is eloquently described:

“The universe he portrays is dual and deceptive, like a good nightmare: a world constantly split between a daytime Arcadia and an inhabited and unquiet night, where the dividing line is clearly visible and easy to cross, both a danger signal and an invitation to disobedience” (Source).

If you look throughout the landscapes, the backdrops are frequently divided by bold demarcations of light and dark, with no apparent barriers between them; one can “switch sides” with a surprising ease. What Chimney seems to be depicting here is a pervasive ambiguity, a hybridic reading of morality and spirituality that reveals there is no singular conception of good and evil; instead, we are all just navigating the joys and misfortunes of existence. As the above statement continues, “the artist wants to assert that celebrating life and escaping death is what joins all beings” (Source).

Visit Chimney’s website and Facebook page and immerse yourself in his dualistic, symbolic visions, the interpretations of which are quite literally endless. His work will be exhibited at the Stephen Romano Gallery in Brooklyn from March 5 – April 30. (Via designboom)

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Carl Warner Recreates Landscapes With Food





English photographer Carl Warner creates realistic landscapes that are made out of food. As an experienced landscape photographer, Warner puts his talents to work in order to reinvent the conventional type. The ‘Foodscapes’ are created in Carl’s London studio where he crafts out each and every little detail (all components completely made out of food) through intricate and laborious steps. The scenes are photographed in layers from foreground to background. The food products used tend to wither quite quickly under the beaming lights, this might take each landscape even more time to get finished.

He first starts off with a set of drawings; he lines up the model-drawings that he would like to work with, and from those he picks the one that will be worked on.

Warner has a team of food stylists and other artists that help him with the process.

“ Although I’m very hands on with my work, I do use model makers and food stylists to help me create the sets. I tend to start with a drawing which I sketch out in order to get the composition worked out, this acts as a blue print for the team to work to.”

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Made With Color Presents: Lost In The Paintings Of Edith Beaucage, With A Ballerina And Her Entourage At A Rave

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Beautiful/Decay is pleased to introduce online website building platform Made With Color, which empowers artists artists to build a professional website in minutes. Made With Color allows artists to build a sleek website and share their art without having to code and spend hours on lay-outs. The simplified and responsive navigation is made to be functional. Giving both the artists and the viewers the possibility to explore some of the best contemporary art in a pleasant environment. This week, we are sharing Edith Beaucage’s latest work ‘Chill Bivouac Rhymes’ series.

California based Edith Beaucage translates an atmosphere onto the canvas, using the painting as a snapshot. Her work involves characters, a scenario and a scene. Allowing the imagination of the viewers to go beyond the painting and envision their own story. The ‘Chill Bivouac Rhymes’ series is built as a loose leaf narrative. A ballerina, her entourage, her Russian lover, a rave and a specific, yet invented location: Yellow Boa Canyon.

The paintings depict the characters interacting with each other in the fantasy land created by the artist. Edit Beaucage’s strokes are ‘broad, fluid and relaxed’. Translating a world of floating moments and effortless motions. The characters are blended with the landscape. The same tonality of colors and the same brushstrokes are used for each of them. The artist captures a couple kissing, a girl dancing, a men smoking and a teenager sleeping. Never omitting to add-on the wandering, lingering rhythm which ends up altering the mood and spirit of the viewer.

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Maja Daniels’ Touching Series On Alzheimer’s Patients

Maja Daniels- Photography Maja Daniels- Photography Maja Daniels- PhotographyMaja Daniels- PhotographyPhotographer Maja Daniels is studying aging. Her photo series “Into Oblivion,” shows the raw and fragile lives of those living in an Alzheimer’s ward. Working in a geriatric unit in France, the Swedish photographer Daniels spent three years documenting life for the residents. Those suffering from Alzheimer’s were kept in a locked ward as a protective precaution due to their innate tendencies to wander and get lost.

“This series documents not only the day-to-day challenges in an often ignored sector, but also the wider implications of the growing populations of elderly in modern society as an increasing life span has coincided with the breakdown of the family unit. These aspects have caused a growing disregard for the elderly, swept aside by a commercially driven, youth-obsessed culture. As growing old and being dependent is more taboo than ever, the geriatric institution hides our elders away, safely out of sight.”

Children do not care for their parents as they once did, and national healthcare often fails to meet the needs of those who need it. Bringing the viewer into the heart of this lifestyle, Daniels is hoping to motivate us to view our own personal role within healthcare policy:

“While giving a vision about what living with Alzheimer’s in an institution might mean, I want to motivate people to think about current care policies and the effects it can have on somebody’s life. This project gives a rare insight to a part of the modern geriatric institution. It attempts to create a discussion about our institutionalized, modern way of living as well as the use of confinement as an aspect of care.”

(Excerpt from Source)

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Marie Rime Creates Primitive Masks And Armor Using Board Game Pieces And Party Straws

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Using recycled objects like board game pieces, party straws, and paper fans, Swiss artist Marie Rime created a fantastic set of masks and armor. The separate-yet-similar series are composed of multi-faceted objects that cover the subjects’ entire face and part of their body, forming silhouettes made from the likes of chess pawns and popsicle sticks. It recontextualizes kitsch and transforms the use of these tiny individual elements into a cohesive veil that obscures its model’s face. In both bodies of work, the emphasis is on power and competition.  Rime explains her mask project and writes:

In this series, the notion of game is being questioned. I tried to express my fascination with the relationship between the players. I asked myself what the participants are looking for and whether they are trying to disturb, seduce or intimidate opponents. These reflections led to a series of pictures of a female model wearing masks inspired by primitive tribal art, yet created from elements of the games being played in the championships.

Likewise, with the armor, she states, “These costumes, realised with everyday objects, are the starting point of a reflexion of the relationship between power, war and ornament. These women lose their identity and become the support of their clothing.” (Via La Monda)

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