Get Social:

A’ Arts, Crafts and Ready-Made Design Award Winners

Featured

Micro Matter by Rosa de Jong 1

Micro Matter by Rosa de Jong

Micro Matter by Rosa de Jong

Micro Matter by Rosa de Jong

Eyelash Stand by Naai-Jung Shih

Eyelash Stand by Naai-Jung Shih

Eyelash Stand (detail) by Naai-Jung Shih

Eyelash Stand (detail) by Naai-Jung Shih

As you may already know, the A’ Design Award & Competition is a very large and one of the world’s leading design competitions. Judged by academics, prominent members of the press and successful professionals around the world, awarded designers are the minds behind frequently very compelling projects. Further, there are many categories (100 of them, in fact) covering just about every facet of modern design. Registration for the award is now open. You can find out more and register here.

In the meantime, however, we take a look at past winners of one category: Arts, Crafts and Ready-Made design. This category encompasses works of art, crafted designs and ready-made objects as well as installations and functional sculptures. The Arts, Crafts and Ready-Made Design category would be of particular interest to professional and young artists, designers, design galleries, design and arts departments, and other art, craft and design oriented institutions in the creative industry around the world and all are encouraged to submit.

In addition to a trophy, invitation to a gala celebration in Italy and numerous other perks of a lengthy prize package list, award winners are also offered the opportunity to exhibit their work, a free service, and make their work available for purchase free of any commission. You can find the full award package and more information on the A’ Design Award & Competition at http://www.designaward.com.

Can your art, craft or ready-made design hold its own against these past winners? If so consider registering now here.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

The Art Of The Steal

This is a must see documentary for anyone interested in the art world. I walked out of the theater shaking my head in disbelief!

The Art of the Steal follows the struggle for control of Dr. Albert C. Barnes’ 25 billion dollar collection of modern and post-impressionist art collection of, a treasury of works by Renoir (181 of them), Cezanne (69), Van Gogh (7), Seurat (6), Picasso (46) and Matisse (59), to name just a few, all of it tucked away in the Philadelphia suburb of Lower Merion in a Paul Cret-designed villa Barnes built for it in 1924. The collection contains some of the key works of early Modernism, including Cezanne’s Nudes in a Landscape and The Card Players, Seurat’s Models and Matisse’s The Joy of Life, jewel in the crown of his fauve period.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

The Curious Color Weaved Lands And Human Studies Of Chris Fowler

Chris Fowler‘s work is curious and complex with depth and brightly interwoven colors.  His portfolio demonstrates two primary focuses; people and surreal landscapes.  His  non-descriptive unusual lands are captivating to me purely by his color choices and how he adds zigzag courses, nooks, and abstract crevasses that lead only to the imagination.  I am a big fan of The Human Project he created of little long-limbed creatures finding there way into orbs, slightly reminding me of something you would see under a microscope.  Check out more of Mr. Fowler’s work after the jump.

Currently Trending

From beetle wings to ballpoint pens, the art of Jan Fabre

Jan Fabre is an established artist with a long rap sheet — having shown and made installations everywhere from The Royal Palace in Brussels to The Louvre Museum in Paris. It’s impossible to pigeonhole him down into one medium, since he’s worked with materials as diverse as bic ballpoint pens and beetle wings. Not to mention, he’s also an author and theater director on top of everything else. If you happen to be lucky enough to be in the city of Antwerp from now until September 2012, you can view his sculpture installation entitled PIETAS at Park Spoor Noord. But if you go, don’t forget to send us pictures! (via)

Currently Trending

Jenine Shereos’ Creates Beautifully Intricate Spiderwebs Out Of Lace

shereos-installation1

shereos-installation2

shereos-installation4

shereos-installation5

Boston-based artist Jenine Shereos who we’ve featured in the past for her amazing series of leaves made from human hair.  her amazing series of leaf forms made from human hair. Her more recent work revisits the idea of human-manipulated nature with “De/constructed Lace,” a site-specific installation series of knit-lace that mimics spiderwebs.

In Marnay-Sur-Seine, France she draped the knit threads in windows and doorways, looking like massive, delicate spiderwebs, echoing the white lace curtains in many local homes. The works are not perfect, Charlotte’s Web creations, but looser, more organic forms. Shereos says on her website:

“This installation of knit-lace is suspended in a state of unraveling. The process of its making and unmaking are one and the same.”

In Boston, she worked with black thread and crystals, allowing her web-like art to cast filigreed shadows on the wall amid flickering rainbows from the hanging crystal. The webs are more ominous in black, connecting to walls and windows and floor with fine strands.

“Some of these site-specific works are installed for a period of weeks for viewers to interact with, and others function as a sort of ephemeral, private performance existing afterwards in documentation. Oftentimes, collaborations intended or unintended arise within the environment; a spider spins its delicate webs from the white strands of thread suspended in an unraveling knit curtain, fibrous fragments of seaweed become embedded within a structure of knit fibers, or an array of rainbows flicker amidst white walls and black curtains.”

By co-opting the aesthetics of the natural world, Shereos creates a conscious interaction with the structure of the landscape or the architecture surrounding her art, uniting real and surreal, natural and constructed, fluidity and stillness.

Currently Trending

Alexey Malina

4462764595_fa58251666

If our sins had a shape it would probably look quite similar to how Alexey Malina, a Russian designer/ digital artist, imagined them. Alexey created a series of abstractions based on the seven deadly sins. He explores each vice through geometrical shapes but without losing the probable syrupy movement they have. I especially enjoyed his interpretation of “wrath.”

Currently Trending

Bang! Bang! Studio and the Weather

Bang! Bang! Studio, based in Russia, collaborated with IT company Yandex to create an interactive weather application for the iPad. Utilizing the studio’s rich variety of illustrations, 70 works are animated to keep your daily check of the weather fresh. Best part? App is totally FREE and available in Russian and English. Reviews suggest the size of the app makes it a bit slow, but the pictures are still nice to look at, and I like the idea of adding some art to a daily activity without losing functionality.

Currently Trending

Emilio @ Year of the Ox @ GR2

Heres a chance to meet renowned artist (and B/D fave) Emilio this saturday at Giant Robot2 as well as other great artsts at Giant Robot2 on Sawtelle. He will be presenting his latest works as part of the Year of the Ox show. 

 

Currently Trending

Tony Matelli’s Realistic Sleepwalker Sculpture Terrorizes College Campus

matellisculpture6

matellisculpture7 matellisculpture9

Tony Matelli‘s realistic “Sleepwalker” sculpture has created a bit of controversy among students at Wellesley, where the sculpture was installed outside of the college’s Davis Musuem. For Lisa Fischman, the museum’s director, the sculpture addresses the boundary of what we expect from art inside a museum versus the outside. Junior Zoe Magdid, the student who initiated a petition to have the sculpture removed, disagrees. “We were really disappointed that she seemed to articulate that she was glad it was starting discussion, but didn’t respond to the fact that it’s making students on campus feel unsafe, which is not appropriate,” Magid said. “We really feel that if a piece of art makes students feel unsafe, that steps over a line.” More than 300 students have signed the petition so far.

While I can see how Wellesley students could find the sculpture threatening or triggering, I am curious how they would have reacted if Matelli’s female sleepwalker sculpture were installed instead. Most students would probably not feel as threatened by its presence, but that sort of perception would only perpetuate the idea that men alone embody a physical threat, though women are also capable of sexual abuse against others.

However you choose to perceive the sculpture, Matelli’s work provokes viewers and asks them to consider not only the absurdity of a “schlumpy” man sleepwalking campus in his underwear, but also how certain bodies and genders are perceived inside and outside the art gallery. Some of Matelli’s other sculpture work can also be perceived as creepy, but they all seem to address notions of boundaries and gravity, and the defiance of particular expectations. (via gawker)

Currently Trending