Greg Hopkins

subrosa

Subrosa, 2008, 48 x 48", acrylic on canvas, images via Sloan Fine Art

Back in January I walked into Sloane Fine Art and found wallpaper-esque paintings that were floral, decorative, rich in color, and do I dare say, pretty. I roamed the gallery admiring the intricacy of the patterns and its hand crafted details. I then discovered each painting had layers with one design overlapping another in drip-like shapes as if one flower pattern was splattered atop and its remains slithered across the picture plane. It doesn’t end there.

With the guide of a checklist and some explaining from the director I peered even closer to each work and started to decipher letters which led to reading a word or in some, entire sentences, embedded and camouflaged within the painting. I was flabbergasted and excited to experience this process of viewing an artwork. The convergence of visual and literal reading allowed me to peer closer and heightened my curiosity as I discovered elements about the work that would not have been realized at a single glance.

Aiyup, 2008, 48 x 36", acrylic on canvas

Aiyup, 2008, 48 x 36", acrylic on canvas

yesm2

Yes'm, 2005, 2008, 20 x 20", acrylic on canvas

The Future Does Not Exist (Yet), 2009, 20 x 20", acrylic on canvas

The Future Does Not Exist (Yet), 2009, 20 x 20", acrylic on canvas

  • http://beautifuldecay.com Alexis

    These are phenomenal.

  • http://www.susanmulder.wordpress.com Susan Mulder

    These are brilliant!

  • Nodnarb Nosille

    These are some of the most beautiful paintings I have seen in a long time. I would love to find out more about the Greg Hopkins fellow.

  • David Richardson

    These are great! I have a piece of artwork from Greg Hopkins and I love seeing him pop up around the world!