Daniel Cronin’s The Gathering Of The Juggalos

If you remember a while back we posted a fantastic short documentary about the fans of The Insane Clown Posse affectionately known as the Juggalos and their annual festival The Gathering. Well It looks like photographer Daniel Cronin decided to venture into this strange world as well to bring us an honest portrayal of the Juggalos during their yearly pilgrimage to the event. More mesmerizing photos of Juggalos and Juggalettes after the jump. (via)

PANNI MALEKZADEH’s Paintings of Uncomfortable Shame

Panni Malekzadeh’s paintings of young girls juxtaposed with sex store neon signage deal with human vulnerability, boredom, fragility and the imprisonment of oneself. Her work has always been about things in herself that she felt incredibly uncomfortable and embarrassed by. Suggesting ideas of beauty vs. despair, shame, embarrassment and vulnerability that woman many times experience in their lives, Malekzadeh exploits what’s dangerous and what scares her about herself.

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Iris Schieferstein Uses Dead Animals As Her Medium Of Choice

Iris Schieferstein’s work can’t be bothered with traditional sculpture materials like wood, marble or metal. Instead the Dutch artist used the medium of dead animals as raw material for works. She joins fragments of animals together to create new creatures and thus gives a new face to death. We searched on her site and couldn’t find how she aquires her animals but I’m hoping that it doesn’t involve the back of the house and a shot gun. What do you think? Should artists be able to use animals in their works even if it’s a cute cuddly dog? Share your thoughts in our comment section after the jump.

Matthew WATSON’s Paints Beautiful Imperfections

 

The brutally exquisite and honest drawings and paintings of Matthew Watson capture every wrinkle, blemish, hair, and flaw on the faces of his sitters and force you to look beyond the imperfections to discover the beauty that is within.

Blue Rooster Art Supplies Photo Contest!

If you live in the Los Angeles area then you know about our pals over at Blue Rooster Art Supplies. Not only do they carry a vast selection of all your favorite Beautiful/Decay books but they also carry a great assortment of materials for you to create artwork in every medium imaginable!

To kick off the month of June Blue Rooster will be holding an epic photo contest. They want to see and share what is on the edge of your art making experience. Is it a paint stained corner of a warehouse studio? Is it your walk to school? Is it the party after the opening? Whatever is at the periphery of your art, they would like to see it.

All you gotta do is email up to five images of what you consider the edge of your art. Each image will be judged on concept as well as composition. All submissions must be in by midnight June 20th. Send images to [email protected] with the subject “Photo contest”.

Winners will be announced on June 23rd.

Winners Receive:
1st Prize $100 cash + $100 worth of supplies
2nd Prize $50 cash +$50 worth of supplies
3rd Prize $50 worth of supplies
Four Honorable Mentions get $25 worth of supplies each.

Artist Interview: Jeremiah Maddock

Jeremiah Maddock is a hard guy to pin down. Many have spoken of him as some sort of ghost- a shadowy figure that passes through bars and cafes with a suitcase full of muted drawings, and an unknown past. This legend surrounding the artist, who lives -most of the time- in New York City, creating richly patterned mixed media works populated with ghoulish creatures and tramps, is likely a product of his obvious lack of desire for external validation. It’s clear that Maddock, who has no personal website, maintains a very pure process; he is interested more in the act of creating -and the motivations behind such an act- than any finished product.

I caught up with Jeremiah in-between his extensive travels throughout the interior of the country. Read the interview after the jump, which includes the artist’s thoughts on steez-biting Mayans, art fairs with Josh Keyes in high school, and collaborating with the dead.

Ben Long’s Dust Drawings & Scaffolding Sculptures

British artist Ben Long works in a wide variety of mediums from billboards to dust drawings, to massive sculptures made out of scaffolding.

Using his finger to scribe into the layer of dirt built-up from exhaust emissions, Long creates elaborate drawings on the rear shutters of white haulage trucks. In this on-going series, collectively entitled The Great Traveling Art Exhibition, he expands upon the daubing and crude slogans that commonly adorn commercial freight vehicles.

By conceiving the project so that it may exist beyond the confines of the traditional gallery space, The Great Traveling Art Exhibition fulfilled Long’s desire to target and appeal to individuals unreceptive to the presentation of contemporary art in museums and art institutions. Furthermore, as a project born of pragmatic concerns, it enabled the artist to exercise creative expression early-on in his career without the need for a studio, gallery or financial backing.

Long’s Scaffolding sculptures are  Inspired by his experiences working on building sites as a teenager, the project asserts the value of a disciplined working practice, the hard graft of manual employment and celebrates the role the construction industry plays in the advancement of urban development.

Thematically, Scaffolding Sculptures utilize cultural archetypes familiar in domestic and decorative art, whilst also making reference to art historical imagery such as Monarch of the Glen by Sir Edwin Landseer and Whistlejacket by George Stubbs. With each artwork the base structure serves to visually reinforce the sculptural intent of the project, making comparisons with the plinth, as well as reminding the viewer of a conventional use of scaffolding based on the familiar right-angle and cross bracing process.

TipToland’s Hyper Realistic Ceramic Sculptures

The characters in Tip Toland’s hyper realistic sculptures are fragile creatures that find themselves at the end of adulthood or at the beginning of childhood. Those stages in life have a certain vulnerability, isolation and innocence in common. Toland attempts to demonstrate the decline preceding death, and the increased separation from others it brings. Their expressions are unengaged and convey a sense of deep psychological detachment that is sad and enigmatic as well as dignified by the process of natural aging. In his article for, Ceramics: Art and Perception, Glen Brown states, “[The works] weigh upon [the viewer] for the simple reason that they reflect the profound, inevitable solitude that envelops the beginning and the end of life.”

While exploring age and aging, Toland’s work attempts to give voice to inner psychological and spiritual states of being. What is of primary importance to her is that the figures contain particular aspects of humanity, which they mirror back to the viewer. It’s the fragility and transient aspect of mankind that the artist is after. That is one reason for choosing very old or very young subjects; they both portray innocence as well as complexity.  While her subjects are sometimes self-portraits, they are meant to convey universal truths about humanity, society and the self.

The hyper realism of Toland’s figures comes from her attention to detail and unique use of materials. Using an encaustic technique, Toland creates a waxy finish for the skin that mimics real flesh. She even goes so far as to incorporate actual human hair into the works. The porcelain eyes create a doll-like realism that is both haunting and entrancing, while carefully defined wrinkles, skin tone, tooth enamel, and bone structure, are remarkably realistic.