Justin B. Hansch: Girls and Grils

I grew up in rural Indiana, but Justin B. Hansch’s exhibition GIRLS & GRILS gives me a sense of nostalgia for a beach-based coming of age story that I never lived. Hazy memories of lazy days and sexy babes drive the content of the show, and a similarly instinctual application of paint is the perfect pairing for this type of imagery. Tight edged graphic elements punctuate luscious gestural moments with a natural ease. It is clear that Hansch has a solid grasp of what a well-designed painting is capable of.

The exhibition is organized in a Pac-man-esque timeline of girl, grill, girl (and so on) – which allows the paintings to operate individually and collectively as one larger installation. As summer comes to a close GIRLS & GRILS functions as “the last word” from America’s most romanticized season, and a welcome reminder that days like those portrayed will be back again next year with the same casual expectations as years past. The show will be on view at Steve Turner Contemporary until October 6th, and I encourage you to make time for it during these busy opening weeks of the fall gallery season.

P.S. I’ve included a few examples of Hansch’s previous work to give you a more well rounded representation of his practice.

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Anne Lindberg’s Thread Installations

zip drawing, 2012 and parallel 35, 2012 (installation view). Courtesy of Carrie Secrist Galllery.

spot drawing 06, 2012. Graphite and colored pencil on cotton mat board: 58 x 51 inches. Courtesy of Carrie Secrist Gallery.

It’s entirely possible that Anne Lindberg created a million straight lines for her solo show “sustaining pedal” at Carrie Secrist Gallery. Funny thing is none of those lines – whether drawn or created with thread – ever meet or intersect one another.

Lindberg’s process-intensive pieces are minor monuments to control, elegance, and more than a little patience on the part of their creator. The finest work in the show is a 35-foot long fiber installation suspended between two adjoining walls in the main gallery. zip drawing (2012) consists of thousands of strands of Egyptian cotton thread strung so close together that they become swarming densities of floating color. The shimmering effect of light bouncing off the tightly strung fiber is gorgeous, but it can also have a dizzying, almost epileptic effect depending on how your eye receives the work at a given moment. Painting, drawing, and color theory are natural touchstones for the piece, but so is the notion of “suturing,” a concept traditionally associated with film that describes the mental process by which a succession of individual static images are experienced as a seamless, flowing visual event in the eye of the viewer. The thread can operate in the same way, coalescing into an airy mist, or the effect can be ruptured by the blurred staccato of a thousand tiny filaments.

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Eric Shaw and Henry Gunderson at FFDG in San Francisco

Tom Betthauser:

Both artist’s work share an obtuse unearthly charm as a common language, and their work promises to have an energetic and productive conversation in their upcoming exhibition.

Great show up at FFDG in San Francisco right now. Eric Shaw and Henry Gunderson spent a couple weeks on the beast coast cooking up some vibey abstractions for us and now they’re ready to be seen! Both artist’s works definitely play off each other really nicely, and if you’re out in SF, this one is not to be missed. See more from the show below.

Images courtesy of FFDG.

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Paul Chiappe’s Extremely Small Drawings of Vintage Photographs

Crazy small drawings from Edinburgh-based artist Paul Chiappe. Recreating graphite versions of early 20th century photography, the artist meticulously produces his works within tiny confines. Many of his drawings fall below the 4×4 cm. mark. Looking at the sad faces of our forebears given life by Chiappe’s drawings, you get the sense that they might easily have been forgotten by the world. His efforts celebrate those we’ve lost in a really unique way. Check out more below. (via) Read More >

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Sol Calero’s Neo-Folk Sculpture and Installation

Sol Calero‘s work investigates the ancestral through a visual language which includes fabric constructions, found objects and images, archives, painting and drawing.  Family clippings and photos overlap with house-plants and altered images of ancient ruins, tools for remembering and misremembering.  Her recent project “Column Study” includes research into the origins of found West German ceramics, notated on their bases, which are assembled and disassembled, unclear if they constitute an ancient column discovered by archaeologists or a domesticated kitsch Brancusi sculpture.  Her fabric works include capes used in abstract ritual performances and also wall pieces which operate in the vernacular of painting, often created with the discarded clothing of her family members.  The work is often balanced between worlds, warm traditions with cold minimalism, personal narratives with pages torn from children’s craft books, the hot chaos of Venezuela with the cold European winter.  Her project-based practice also includes running the gallery space Kinderhook & Caracas in Berlin with frequent collaborator Christopher Kline. Read More >

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Cloud Made of Thousands of Lightbulbs at Nuit Blanche Festival in Calgary

Cloud is an installation piece from Calgary artist/filmmaker Caitlind Brown. The piece, part of the Nuit Blanche festival, involves 5,000 light bulbs, most of which are burnt out, that form a large cloud. Participants in the festival were able to pull on metal strings -rain- in order to illuminate sections of the “cloud”, giving off the impression of lightning. Imagine an entire landscape composed of lightbulbs- lightbulb sun, lightbulb trees, lightbulb mountains, etc. Lots of possibilities…

Click past the jump to see more photos of the piece. (via)

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Photographer Uses Sugar, Cotton, Feathers and Chocolate to Construct Stunning Landscapes

 

As part of our ongoing partnership with Feature Shoot, Beautiful/Decay is sharing Alison Zavos’ article on Matthew Albanese.

“DIY Paradise” was constructed from cotton, salt, cooked sugar, tin foil, feathers & canvas.

 

My work involves the construction of small-scale meticulously detailed models using various materials and objects to create emotive landscapes. Every aspect from the construction to the lighting of the final model is painstakingly pre-planned using methods which force the viewers perspective when photographed from a specific angle. Using a mixture of photographic techniques such as scale, depth of field, white balance and lighting I am able to drastically alter the appearance of my materials.—Matthew Albanese

 

Matthew Albanese is a fine art photographer from New Jersey who specializes in creating and photographing miniatures from common household objects and materials. “New Life I”    (pictured above)  was constructed using painted parchment paper, thread, hand dyed ostrich feathers, carved chocolate, wire, raffia, masking tape, coffee, synthetic potting moss and cotton.

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Danish Artist HuskMitNavn’s Goofy Characters On the Street and Indoors

Copenhagen-based artist and illustrator HuskMitNavn (RememberMyName) applies his tasty character work indoors and out. Whether in a gallery or on the street, his goofy characters are usually spot on. Here’s a small selection of what the guy’s been up to during the past few years, but I highly recommend checking out his site which is packed with images from past projects. Would love to see a collaboration between HMN and Malark. Read More >

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