Diane Han Illustrates Friendly Fish Taco, Unicorn Flies And Other Funny Creatures

Diane Han

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Diane Han is an illustrator and graphic designer originally from Korea, but now living and working in Los Angeles. While diverse, a common thread through Diane’s work is a play on words. Working largely with acrylic on paper, Diane plays with different means of representing animals in order to tell a story that is often critically and socially driven, while still managing to be so approachable and pleasant. I personally love the skunk piece after the jump, talk about a problem-solver. Read More >


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The Found Photograph Collage Drawings Of Joe Rudko

Joe Rudko is a talented artist based in Washington state. In his current series he combines found photographs with his drawings. According to his artist statement: “These works are responses to a shifting relationship with found photographic objects. Collaging a vintage material with hand drawn addendums exposes the vulnerability of the static image.” Check out more images after the jump. Read More >


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Do Ho Suh’s ‘Infinitely’ Repeating Sculpture

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Korean artist Do Ho Suh has often explored thoughts on collective strength (and perhaps weakness) in his work before.  However, his new sculpture Karma addresses a more personal collectivity.  This enormous sculpture seems to stretch on perpetually.  At the sculpture’s base a man stands with his eyes covered by another man crouching on his back.  That man’s eyes are also covered by another man crouching on his back and this pattern appears to repeat ad infinitum.  Perhaps a literal visual interpretation of the concept of karma or even the saying ‘history is doomed to repeat itself’.

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Marion Balac’s Apparitional Void Drawings

Marion Balac lives and works in France. She creates large graphite works that are jam packed with detail. Her drawings often feature extremely dense foliage juxtaposed with large white voids. The visual combination of painstaking detail coupled with empty space helps to accentuate her lush compositions. Are the mysterious ghostly forms ominous forces? Or respite from an ever swelling forest? The viewer is pulled into a stark landscape where anxiety reigns. Read More >


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The Luminaria’s Colorful and Inflatable Architecture

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Luminaria by Architects of Air is a touring inflatable structure.  The ‘building’ has made stops internationally since 1992.  Visitors to the Luminaria remove their shoes and enter an air lock.  Once through the airlock visitors are free to roam the structure.  The Luminaria is built of inflated PVC.  Sunlight from outside shines through the various colors of PVC creating an otherworldly glow.  The highly saturated colors coupled with the gently curving walls and floor give the Luminaria a subtle biological nature.  Interestingly one visitor describes the structure as ” Somewhere between a womb and a cathedral.”

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Noam Rappaport at Ratio 3

Noam Rappaport lives and works in Los Angeles. He has just opened his first West Coast solo exhibition at Ratio 3 in San Francisco. Rappaport’s minimal structures are at once slight and commanding, often relying on negative space to complete visual metaphors. The walls behind his pieces are simultaneously backround to and an integral part of the work. The show runs through March 23rd.  From the press release: “This exhibition will feature a series of new works which simultaneously reside between painting, sculpture, assemblage, and drawing. One predominant motif within Rappaport’s work is the representation of image through minimal compositions, color, and mark making. With Rappaport’s discerning use of simplified geometric shapes and refined color palates, the compositions reflect elements of the human form, landscape, and architecture. This suggestion of imagery is balanced with concepts of objecthood as expressed through constructions of commonplace materials and shaped canvases. The peripheries of these objects become the focus as color fields divide the shallow relief canvases, aluminum sheets drape over the edge of plywood panels and graphic lines appear to float in front of the surface.

These hybrid painting supports create a physical and perceptual relationship to the viewer. Negative spaces and blocks of color begin to suggest doorways, windows, and various characteristics that mirror the human figure. The attention to the space between the viewer and the work reinforces the idea that not only does a viewer look but he or she is also looked upon to play an active role in the object’s function.” Read More >


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