Takada’s Delicate World of Paper Sculptures

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Yuko Takada Keller creates detailed and intricate sculptures out of paper. Since 1996, she has been using small triangular pieces to create her designs, which she says “symbolizes something like a molecule.” Her work is inspired by dreams she’s had, and her delicate, cascading designs resonate with ethereality. She claims her work has also evolved over time since she’s realized the connection between the thin delicacy of the paper and skin membranes. From her website,

“Tracing paper has a transparency and an untransparency.
I’m interested in how tracing paper is like a skin membrane.
The skin membrane lies between dream and reality.
The skin membrane lies between consciousness and behavior.
The skin membrane is there when life is born.
The skin membrane is part of a human being.
I want to represent the space that people are aware of
The skin membrane is unconsciousness.”

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Django Django’s WOR, Featuring India’s Wall of Death Riders

Photo by Pavla Kopecna

Django Django‘s crazy new video for “WOR” features India’s Wall of Death Riders in Allahabad. Our friends at Noisey shot the video in a documentary style standing right in the middle of all the action.

I was able to catch the Django’s last show of their US tour at the Fonda Theatre in Hollywood last month. “Hello citizens of Los Angeles”, yelled out singer Vincent Neff before  they jammed into “Hail Bop”. The band was a lot of fun to watch since they barely came up for air during their hour long set except when they went acoustic for their song, “Hand of Man”.

Lucky for you they’ll be coming back to the US soon to perform at Bonnaroo and a free show in June at New York’s Central Park Summer Stage with the Zombies and Adam Green & Binki Shapiro so definitely check them out. As for the video, it’s really one of the coolest things I’ve seen in a while.

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The Straw Sculptures Of Francesca Pasquali

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Italian artist Francesca Pasquali uses a common household item as a point of departure: straws.  Perhaps because we typically use and see straws one at a time, Pasquali’s simple work can be especially intriguing to look at.  She cuts the straws to varying lengths and arranges them one by one into a large mass.  The fields of straws almost appear to be organic, similar to coral or bacterial growths.  However, the reality that the sculptures are decidedly inorganic and plastic never entirely escapes the viewers attention.  Pasquali achieves an interesting play between natural formations and industrial materials.

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Maggie Haas’ Everyday Impermanence

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Finding its forms in a combination of drawing, object-making and installation, the work of artist Maggie Haas investigates the lives of unfinished and discarded objects, with a particular interest in construction materials. She was recently awarded a residency at The Lab, in San Francisco, CA—where she has been working primarily with materials she has found at the space. Working with what she is given, Haas uses her transformational powers to great effect: expanding upon everyday materials with her acute sense of color and composition.

Since beginning her residency, Haas has been creating work both from and in the gallery, she has created a series of ever-shifting structures. Using the gallery as both a medium and a platform to create, Haas has used her most recent body of work to explore flux, transition and our relationship to the idea of impermanence. Hovering between blueprint-style drawing and abstraction, her drawings of imagined structures and patterns explore the materiality of paper and ink—while her propped-up structures and object-based art elegantly underline the thesis that everything is in flux, everything can be moved, shifted, collapsed and/or carried away.

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Graffiti From Wall To Gallery

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Miranda Donovan explores the invasion of graffiti from the exterior world of landscapes and buildings to the interior one– of bathrooms, bedrooms, and yes, even galleries, where street artists are finding more and more of a home these days. However, Donovan’s work is not just about street politics or the art of tagging here– each piece also examines the quality, textures, associations, and contexts of walls themselves.

Of her work, in Cool Hunting, Donovan states, “The point of departure is a wall, which so often people just overlook . . . It’s something in our daily space constantly, internally and externally, and there’s a romanticism in that, which draws me in. The different combination of languages, the grid, the broken plaster breaking up that grid, the colors, the erosion, is something that really excites me. It’s about combining those languages to tell a story about the passage of time and the analogy of the human psyche, peeling back the onion layers to find the core.”

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Tom Bendtsen’s Massive Book Sculptures

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Tom Bendtsen’s first book sculptures appeared in 1997. After initially creating basic structures, his work evolved with the idea of using the books’ colors to create a pixelated image effect. Bendtsen even fills the gaps in his structures with objects or scenes that ask the viewer to consider ideas of history, narrative, and creativity. The laterality of the structures and how this mirrors our absorption of contrasts and oppositions inherent in written narrative are also at play. His largest structure is composed of 16,000 books. String is used to create the forms of the sculptures, and then those forms are filled with books.

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A Time Lapsed And Miniaturized Melbourne by Nathan Kaso

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Nathan Kaso‘s series Miniature Melbourne takes a tilt shift look at the Australian city.  Tilt shift is a photographic technique that essentially “corrects” the distortion created by perspective.  The technique has the effect of making an scene resemble a miniature version of itself.  Tilt shift photography has been featured on Beautiful/Decay in the past.    However, Kaso transformed 10 months worth of his tilt-shift Melbourne photographs into a time-lapse video.  Miniature Melbourne captures the work and play, the large life of the city.  Watch the video after the jump.  [via]

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A Museum Of Broken Relationships

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These photographs are images of a unique museum collection.  The Museum of Broken Relationships originally began as a project in Croatia by Zagreb based artists Olinka Vištica and Dražen Grubišić now tours internationally.  While many may destroy the painful mementos of a failed relationship, the museum seeks to transform the impulse into a creative one.  The museum points out other rituals such as funerals, marriages, and even graduation farewells while break-up do not have a formal ceremony.  In a way the museum offers one to assist with the emotional impact of an ended reltionship.  For this reason, the museum encourages people to donate personal belongings to be exhibited as “their love legacy as a sort of a ritual, a solemn ceremony.”

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