Made With Color Presents: Scott Anderson’s Paintings Walk The Fine Line Between Abstraction And Representation

Scott Anderson PaintingScott Anderson Painting
Scott Anderson Painting
Once again we’ve teamed up with premiere website building platform Made With Color to bring you exclusive artist features. Each week we join forces to bring you some of the most exciting artists and designers who use Made With Color to create their beautifully designed and user friendly websites. Made With Color doesn’t just help artists create gorgeous websites but allows them to do so in a few minutes without having to touch a line of code. This week we are excited to bring you the work of midwest painter Scott Anderson whose work balances on the fine line between representation and abstraction.
The source material for Scott Anderson’s paintings are preexisting images – found photographs, his own snap shots, drawings or collages – that fall within broad archetypal categories such as portraiture, landscape, iconography, and still life.  The common denominator of these source images is distance, either due to authorship, such as in the found photographs, or time, as in the source imagery of Anderson’s own making.  The act of making new paintings from these images allows Anderson to understand them in new ways and to develop a idiosyncratic visual vocabulary.  In this sense, Scott Anderson is a translator.  What is foregrounded in his work is the way he perceives, organizes, scrambles, and prioritizes the images he makes the paintings from.  The delivery of the message IS the message.  Scott Anderson’s paintings establish an alternate reality in which they are safe to exist as ordinary illuminations of their surroundings.

Although relatively abstract, Anderson’s paintings have their origins in representational imagery.  This dependence on the objective along with his overall motivations put him in dialogue with early Modern art movements, particularly Dada, Surrealism, and Cubism.  Scott Anderson is interested in the continuation of this art historical conversation as a means to change the rules of the game as it were.  Where Modernists of all stripes were largely interested in winning the game by ending it (to paraphrase the critic, Jan Verwoert), Anderson sees this mode of objective / non-objective hybridity as one way among many in which to view the world.

Scott Anderson Painting Scott Anderson Painting
Scott Anderson Painting
Scott Anderson Painting Scott Anderson Painting
Scott Anderson Painting Scott Anderson Painting