Spooky Savings! 50% Off B/D Book The Seven Deadly Sins!

 

To celebrate Halloween Beautiful/Decay is putting our infamous “Seven Deadly Sins” book on sale for half price! That’s right now you can get 167 full color pages of Lust, Gluttony, Greed, Sloth, Wrath, Pride, and Envy at half the price. Remember every book is hand numbered in an edition of 1500 on the back cover and once sold out will never be reprinted. Just type in discount code “halloween2013″ during check out to save 50% off this book. Sale ends Monday November 4th.  So get to it you ghouls and ghosts and get your hands on one of our beautifully designed books for a fraction of the price!

Read more about the book and check out some sample spreads after the jump.

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Brian Luong’s Month-long Halloween-Themed Drawing Marathon

Drawlloween Day 29

Day 29 – Ghoul

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Day 26 – Vampire

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Day 30 – Pumpkin

Let’s face it, sometimes artists need a little extra motivation to keep creating and challenging themselves. Based on the Drawing-a-Day style exercise, Drawlloween (generally hash-tagged so each artist’s daily offering can easily be searched on social media sites) is the month of October equivalent where artists and illustrators test their skills and dedication. Illustrator Brian Luong has taken this challenge, and come out with a completely cohesive and solid body of Halloween-themed work. The Southern California-based Luong has gone beyond mere renderings of each instructional prompt (list below), creating dark narratives that add necessary darkness, mystery and visual heft to each drawing.

Although Luong’s portfolio shows a range of strengths typical of most illustrators, Luong’s muted palate, tight hatching and large areas of shading have become more focused and with the project. On the eve of the project’s culminating date of Halloween, the drawings have developed their own distinct, chalky, monochromatic style. Dark shadows have became longer, and scenes of street stalking vampires, discovered corpses and goblin-carved pumpkins became more imaginative than most other participants. Luong’s final Drawlloween piece should be posted today, Halloween, on his Tumblr. 

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Incredible Pumpkin Sculptures At The Great Jack O’ Lantern Blaze

The Great Jack O' Lantern Blaze - Joshua Bousel

The Great Jack O' Lantern Blaze - Joshua Bousel

Photo by Joshua Bousel

The Great Jack O' Lantern Blaze -  Anthony Quintano

Photo by Anthony Quintano

The Great Jack O' Lantern Blaze - Joshua Bousel

Photo by Joshua Bousel

The Great Jack O’Lantern Blaze touts itself as being the Tri-State’s (New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut) biggest and most exciting Halloween event. Their hubris is deserved; The glowing pumpkins and the elaborate installation of carvings are incredible.

The event features more than 5,000 hand-carved, illuminated jack o’ lanterns, and is set against the backdrop of the historic,18th-century riverside landscape of the Hudson River Valley. All displays are made out of pumpkins, and arranged into the likes of giant sea monsters, dinosaurs, snakes, and shrunken “Little Monsters.” It even features a Tunnel O’ Pumpkin Love. (If you’re wondering how that works, it involves gourd-filled Jack-in-the-Boxes springing up and bouncing around.)

Pumpkin carving has a rich history in the UK. The Instagram blog describes it, writing:

Although only associated with Halloween as we know it today since the late 1800s, the tradition of gourd carving dates back to the 18th and 19th centuries in rural Ireland and England. People created jack o’lanterns for the old holidays of Samhain and All Souls’ Night when spirits were thought to be the most active. Grotesque faces carved into the objects were meant to frighten away any ghouls seeking to do harm.

These sculptural displays sound like heaven for anyone that loves hand-carved pumpkins and Halloween. I’m a bit jealous I’m not able to see the Great Jack O’Lantern Blaze in person! If you’re like me and unable to make it to the Blaze, fear not. Visitors are not shy to share their photos on Instagram or Flickr. (Via Colossal. Photos via Josh BouselKimberly QuintanoBryan Haeffele, and Jeremy Bernstein.)

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A Peek Into The Home Life Of Cosplay Enthusiasts

Just the two of us, Klaus Pichler, 2013

Just the two of us, Klaus Pichler, 2013

Just the two of us, Klaus Pichler, 2013

Just the two of us, Klaus Pichler, 2013

None of the people photographed for Klaus Pichler‘s newest series, “Just the Two of Us” are dressed in Halloween costumes. For this project, Pichler documents Austrians involved with various types of costume play (cosplay)  at home in full costume. By capturing these costumers in their domestic spheres, Pichler allows his subjects the comfort of home, but for objective viewers of the work, the subjects could feel a bit out of place.

“Normally, all the costumes and traditions, they have one thing in common: there is some kind of public use of these costumes,” Pichler explains. Some of his subjects are enthusiastic participants of the Carnival season, which is called Fasching in Austria, while others are part of a LARP – live action role play – community. Pichler even captures portraits of the Krampus and the Perchten – traditional Austrian figures associated with Christmas and Wintertime who are often conflated.

“Who hasn’t had the desire just to be someone else for awhile? Dressing up is a way of creating an alter ego and a second skin which one’s behaviour can be adjusted to. Regardless of the motivating factors which cause somebody to acquire a costume, the main principle remains the same: the civilian steps behind the mask and turns into somebody else…’Just the Two of Us’ deals with both: the costumes and the people behind them.”

Be sure to check out previous posts we’ve done on Pichler’s work here. (via the new york times)

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Andres Serrano And Three Other Artists Make Work About Death

Andres Serrano

Andres Serrano

Tereza Zelenkova

Tereza Zelenkova

Berlinde De Bruyckere

Berlinde De Bruyckere

Death becomes us all eventually, as we are exploring in the works covered in this two part article.  In light of the Halloween season, and the historical implications of death of this season, we are highlighting artists who create work that addresses or is informed by death and dying.  Part 1 included and discussed the works of Damien Hirst, Doris Salcedo, Angelo Filomeno, Konrad Smolenski and Joel Peter Witkin.  Here we examine the work of Andres Serrano, Berlinde De Bruyckere, Tereza Zelenkova and Oskar Dawicki.

Andres Serrano has built a reputation creating imagery that is shocking and confronts the viewer with heavy content, unapologetically.  His series on death takes this to the next level. Each image, a close-up intimate composition of the deceased subject, is titled according to the cause of death.  The Death Series functions as a mirror of our own mortality, delivered rawly and beautifully in rich colors and blank stares.

The work of Berlinde De Bruyckere is rough and organic, abstractly anatomical and animalistic in delivery.  The artist’s sculptural work emanates a quality that lies somewhere between a murder scene and a meat locker.  De Bruyckere’s pieces have a realistic quality of flesh torn apart yet are executed with fairly common artistic materials such as wax, wood, iron, cotton and wool is captivating.

Tereza Zelenkova created a series entitled Supreme Vice during a journey through the deserts of the Southwest.  Captured in the bleakest and most barren of environments, Zelenkova’s photographic works meditate on death through a poetic narrative that seems to address a spiritual continuum that overlaps life and death and creates a bridge between the two polarities.  The black and white series, that spans grey areas of mortality, is bound in a book, also entitled Supreme Vice.

The obituary series by Oskar Dawicki which was first exhibited in 2004 in a show aptly titled “The end of the world by accident” is far more ironic than the previously mentioned works.  The photographic works capture collages Dawicki assembled of actual obituaries he discovered in the newspaper.  The names of the deceased in the images appear to be celebrities and other famous figures at first glance.  The works toy with the spectrum of perception of significance in the value of human life and death.

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Louis Fortier’s Grotesque Self Portraits

Louis Fortier - sculpture

Louis Fortier - sculpture Louis Fortier - sculpture

Louis Fortier’s works are that kind of fascinating that is all at once grotesque, perhaps even borderline repulsive, and so incredibly bizarre that you can’t look away.  Devoted to the head, Fortier has spent the past decade exploring the subject.  Using numerous wax or plaster heads, made using his own as a model, Fortier manipulates, deforms, collapses and reconfigures the head’s natural shape.  The repetition of the body part reveals a deep fixation with the human face, identity and individuality.  Probing into an analysis of genetic manipulation and cloning Fortier’s heads speak to the idea of multiple selves, or the personalities/ lives we might have had.

This idea of numerous variations on a single motif also raises questions about the idea of chance and unpredictability.  Removing the casts from their mould before they are solidified, Fortier then allows metamorphoses to occur.  Fortier seems to be wondering about the idea of nature versus nurture and where the artist’s hand fits into the equation.   Partially directing the manipulation and partially leaving the results to chance, each of Fortier’s heads becomes a different variation of himself.  In making these atypical self-portraits, Fortier analyzes the artist’s ability to destroy and create his identity.

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Damien Hirst And Four Other Artists Who Make Art About Death

Damien Hirst

Damien Hirst

Joel Peter Witkin

Joel Peter Witkin

Angelo Filomeno

Angelo Filomeno

It’s Halloween season, and campy macabre aesthetic surrounds us, making the general public a little more open to the darker parts of our existence.  Reflecting back on the origin of this holiday, All Hallow’s Eve and Samhain, the pagan celebration, it’s clear that death and the unseen world is the foundation.  Our ancestors believed that the veil to the other side became thin or disappeared completely on this night, allowing the spirit world to comingle with the physical and living world. There are many people and cultures that still hold this belief and practice today.

In light of the season I began searching through aesthetically significant contemporary art that finds its foundations in death and dying.  This is Part 1 of 2 of the scope of art about death, ranging widely in medium and other interwoven themes.  Damien Hirst, Angelo Filomeno, Joel Peter Witkin, Konrad Smolenski and Doris Salcedo all embrace the subject of death and dying in a widely varied manner.  As well, all are highly revered in their own right for their individual continuums of art produced over the years.

Damien Hirst is no stranger to controversy as an artist.  He always delivers shock value well and does not shy away from creating work that makes viewers squirm.  Materials he used to create the pieces featured here range from dead flies, to animal carcasses, formaldehyde and maggots.  Hirst’s works don’t just discuss the business of birth, death and dying- they display it in action right before your eyes, in a way that some of the work nearly becomes about life itself. 

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Ye Chang’s Metamorphic Installation Of 10,000 Petri Dishes

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Chinese architect Ye Chang‘s Kong Shanshui/Empty Shanshui is a naturally transforming installation consisting of over 10,000 petri dishes. Part of the “Pavilion of China – Architecture China 2013” exhibition, which recently opened at the Palacio Quintanar in the Segovia, Spain, the piece has a unique, changing quality. The base of the installation consists of layers of white stones which fill the ancient palace’s courtyard, echoing peaceful, meditative gardens. On top of the stones are piles or gatherings of petri dishes, some ten thousand in total, stacked in various forms, resembling miniature hills, mountains and rock formations.

According to Sue Wang at Cafa Art Info, the installation transforms at different stages of the day, citing firsthand that, “…there is dew in the petri dishes in the morning; light is gentle in the morning and the glass is transparent; when there is direct sunlight at noon, the installation is entirely placed in the sun, strongly reflecting, which is in contrast to the dry surrounding environment, making people feel cool; the setting sun is blocked by the house in the evening, so the glass reflects the light from the sky, seen as backlit, it looks like the scales of a huge creature stranded on the beach, with rich tones; the whole glass hills is self-luminous at night, producing a transition effect changing from semi darkness to darkness.”  This daily, natural transformation of the installation not only is a quickly-viewable message of transition, but it’s meditative qualities also call to attention how both art and architecture can effect a viewer’s ability to feel at peace in a home, garden or museum experience.  (via myampgoesto11 and CAFA Art Info)

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