Get Social:

Artist Arranges Thanksgiving Meals Into Iconic Works Of Art

Rothstein, Photo

Jackson Pollock

Rothstein, Photo

Piet Mondrian

Rothstein, Photo

Pablo Picasso

Rothstein, Photo

Vincent Van Gogh

Just in time for the holidays, self-proclaimed “painter, illustrator, writer, jeweler, and up-to-no-gooder,” Hannah Rothstein has cooked up a Turkey-day treat. Straightforwardly titled, “How Famous Artists Would Plate Thanksgiving Meals,” this series of photographs portrays plates of tried-and-true Thanksgiving staples reimagined as if they were created by celebrated figures in modern art history.

Based in San Francisco, Hannah “focuses on finding clever and humorous ways to look at ordinary objects and ideas.” Whether simply rearranging the food or drastically fracturing the plates, the works comprising her “Thanksgiving Special” represent her playful, experimental approach.

In true Piet Mondrian fashion, Hannah has divided her rations into a geometric grid. To evoke the work of Pablo Picasso, her meal is fragmented and rearranged into an unrecognizable form. In homage to Georges Seurat, she has turned her peas and potatoes into a pointillist picture, while plopped morsels and splattered cranberry sauce mimic Jackson Pollock’s drip paintings.

With aesthetic allusions to myriad other artists, including Vincent Van Gogh, René Magritte, Mark Rothko, Julian Schnabel, Andy Warhol, and Cindy Sherman, there will certainly be no scarcity of art at the table this year.

Bon appétit!

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Mandy Roos Reimagines Retro Sci-Fi Footwear

Mandy Roos - Design

Mandy Roos - Design

Mandy Roos - Design

Mandy Roos - Design

Designer Mandy Roos injects psychedelic playfulness into her series, “Invasion of the Foot Carrier.” Calling upon the specters of miniature foam spaceships, Shatneresque choreography, and gold lamé, Roos’s conceptual line of footwear is a Technicolor tumble into the days of past future.

In some of her designs, Roos plays with gelatinous gloop and gel; in others, she draws inspiration of extraterrestrial explorers and their iconic caterpillar treads. Though the whole collection could be described as whimsical, there’s also a sense of optimism: Roos describes the project as “an inspirational vision meant for the footwear industry.” Her designs are imbued the kind of lighthearted curiosity that defined the years when people still thought the World of Tomorrow was a light on the horizon.

With names like “Aurora Glow,” “Stargazer,” and “Moon Crawler,” Roos embraces the neon cheesiness of retro sci-fi glory. Her designs might not be realistic, but they’re not meant to be. And after so many dystopian futures, both imagined and predicted, it’s refreshing to see such bold cheerfulness. (via Flavorwire)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Max Gärtner’s Incredibly Intricate Animal Stencils

Max Gärtner - cut paper on boardMax Gärtner - cut paper on board Max Gärtner - cut paper on boardMax Gärtner - cut paper on board

Max Gärtner is a man with seriously good cutting skills. And an amazing talent for line work. He draws the heads of bears, tigers, birds, wolves and humans with an incredible intricacy. The Berlin based illustrator transforms hundreds of pencil-drawn lines into interwoven, floating stencils and then pins the result onto backing boards. Drawing inspiration from the original masters of line work – Gustav Klimt and Egon Schiele, Gärtner is concentrated on rendering elegant forms from flat lines.

Currently showing an exhibition at BC Gallery in Berlin titled “No Lie In Fire“, Gärtner pays tribute to animals that have either metaphorical or subliminal importance to him. Trying to close the gap between the ‘supernatural’ and ‘natural’ world, the artist embarks on journeys through the woods and takes note of different animal forms that influence him while there. He says:

There are encounters in life, which are accompanied by an incredible force and which, once experienced, leave you convinced of their significance as messages from a higher universal power. [No Lie In Fire] is an exhibition of portraits of some of the creatures I have encountered and who have influenced the course of my life on a fundamental level. I do not know how else to describe it, other than encounters with extremely old souls, which I would like to identity here, free from any religious connotations, as gods. (Source)

Because of his obsession with, and respect for the natural world, Gärtner has garnered himself a reputation as ‘an explorer among artists’. He is continually interested in the role that the creatures around us play, and how they influence us. To him, reality and dreams are one and the same. His exhibition runs from Nov 14 – Dec 27. Watch the trailer for the show after the jump.

Currently Trending

Exclusive Craftsy Online Class Offer “Painting An Allegory: Concept To Canvas”

Craftsy 1   full_1449_126975_AllegoricalPaintingInProgress_1 full_4164_126976_AllegoricalPaintinginProgressII_1

At Beautiful/Decay we have been partnering with Craftsy, a cutting-edge, multileveled online art class platform and community that brings art classes to your home with versatility and convenient features.  One of the classes at Craftsy that we think is exceptionally strong in content, instructional style and artistic relevance is “Painting An Allegory: Concept To Canvas” taught by artist Martin Wittfooth. For a limited time only, Craftsy is generously offering this class at the deeply discounted price of $19.99 exclusively to Beautiful/Decay readers (offer expires 12/01/14).

Currently Trending

Low Viscosity: Todd Davis’s Exquisite Photographs Of Neon Colored Smoke

Todd DavisTodd Davis  Todd Davis Todd Davis

Photographer Todd Davis doesn’t just take snapshots of gas and fluids, he creates beautiful, ever-interesting abstract images that are impressive and captivating. In his Viscosity Series, he presents different forms of smoke in hundreds of variations – as a colored lump, twisting and turning in on itself, or as a light and airy wisp, silently falling down and fading into the background. Reminiscent of lava lamps, or science experiments when you test different chemicals out against one another, Davis’ work is a gorgeous juxtaposition between weightlessness and form. The smoke exists on the boundary of disappearing or falling apart. Here’s an excerpt from his representative gallery:

The Viscosity Series is a photographic study of the fleeting, random shapes created when two or more dissimilar fluids are introduced. The series is called Viscosity because fluids of different densities permit a moment of suspension before they disseminate in the other giving one the appearance of being more viscous. (Source)

In true abstract fashion, his photos take on many different ideas and images. They can look like paint thrown at a wall and left to coagulate into gooey lumps, or some strange marshmallow cake that’s spilled over the edges of it’s dish, or like a blob of inks and dyes dumped into a glass of water.

Davis not only is able to flatter inanimate subjects (including beverages and tabletop set ups), he also takes beautiful portraiture photography, showing off his skill with intricate lighting configurations. 

Currently Trending

Yoon Ji Seon’s Intricate Self Portraits Use Hanging Threads As Hair

yoon-ji-seon yoon-ji-seon-1 yoon-ji-seon-8 yoon-ji-seon-7

Artist Yoon Ji Seon crafts her collection of self-portraits by intricately stitching photographs with a sewing machine. It’s an ongoing series titled Rag Face, and her facial expressions change with every piece. While they appear to us as similar-looking individuals, Seon changes it up with different colors and hairstyles. Despite these idiosyncrasies, each portrait has the same features. Most notably, these are hanging threads that mimic hair or tattered rags. The multiple layers of colors and stitches give these works a painterly effect, as if they are gestural and loosely handled; Seon obscures her images by working with her materials in this way.

In 2015, the artist will have a show at the Yossi Milo Gallery in New York City. They describe the her underlying concepts:

By sewing the photograph, a second image is generated on the back that is both a reflection of the front and a completely new image. The two images, combined with the original photograph as a third representation, recall the Buddhist theory that an object exists in many forms and there is no true form. Yoon Ji Seon’s work addresses Buddhist ideology deeply rooted in contemporary Korean society and confronts issues such as plastic surgery and suppression of speech. (Via My Amp Goes to 11)

Currently Trending

Paul Kaptein Tricks The Eye With His Exquisite Handcrafted Wooden Sculptures

Kaptein, Sculpture
      Kaptein, Sculpture

Kaptein, Sculpture

Kaptein, Sculpture

Australian sculptor Paul Kaptein handcrafts laminated wood into exquisitely seamless sculptures. Interested in materialism and inspired by both nature and the concept of time, Kaptein creates works that are realistic yet surreal, rooted simultaneously in real life and in fantasy.

To Kaptein, the use of laminated wood is central to his practice. Representative of the dialogue between expansion and contraction and the relationship between interconnection and incompleteness, “the panels slip and slide, creating their own holes which exasperate the gaps in the fabric of the universe.”

While his wooden works vary in subject matter—a common motif being hooded, faceless busts—they all convey Kaptein’s innate interest in portraying of “the immaterial as an expression of the overt reliance (and ignorance of the composition) of materialism as a somewhat naive description of reality.” In one of his most recent works, And in the endless sounds there came a pause, the artist tackles reality through illusion: while the meditative figure is clearly distorted by the river-like grooves of his robe’s drapery when observed from the front or back, he appears perfectly normal when viewed from either side.

Ultimately, with its deceptive composition and well-crafted aesthetic, And in the endless sounds there came a pause merges two qualities characteristic of the artist: his interest in fabricating new realities and, of course, his undeniably superb woodworking skills.

Currently Trending

Artist Jessamyn Lovell Tracks Down The Person Who Stole Her Identity And Gets Revenge

lovell-project5

lovell-project1

lovell-project2

lovell-project7

In 2011, a woman named Erin Hart stole artist Jessamyn Lovell’s wallet, and eventually her identity, racking up credit card charges, parking tickets, and even a theft charge in Lovell’s name. As an act of retribution for this infuriating and frightening experience, Lovell created an art exhibition called “Dear Erin,” featuring documents, surveillance photos, videos, and interviews documenting Erin Hart’s crime spree. Hell hath no fury like a woman with a stolen identity.

“Using a camera and occupying the varied roles of victim, stalker, investigator, artist, spy, and vigilante, Lovell offers a body of work that touches on contemporary concerns of surveillance and selfhood within the information age.”

The thoroughness of “Dear Erin Hart” is impressive and somewhat alarming. In the attempt to “[understand] this woman and the course of events that brought their lives together,” Lovell hired a private investigator and even photographed Erin Hart being released from jail, a series of photos that are disturbingly stalker-like. The project was exhibited at SF Camerawork from September 3 – October 18, 2014.

Now, in a continuation of the project, Lovell hopes to contact Erin Hart in order to deliver a letter she’s written. She’s raising money for her trip (from Albuquerque, NM where Lovell lives to San Francisco, CA where Hart lives) through the sale of her own photos on Etsy and using a crowd funding campaign posted on her Facebook page.

“Lovell says that her hope is to reach out to her identity thief one more time in an attempt to get her most burning questions answered. Lovell also says that even if her attempt fails and Hart refuses to talk to her, she will at least know Hart knows of Lovell’s existence. She also hopes that Erin Hart will accept the invitation to allow Lovell to interview her and agree to be recorded.”

Erin Case stole Jessamyn Lovell’s identity, time, and peace of mind. Lovell, in relentlessly pursuing her thief, robs her of her anonymity.

Currently Trending