Iight Installations by Luzinterruptus

 

Luzinterruptus is an anonymous urban arts group based in Milan that uses “light as a raw material and the dark as [their] canvas.” They’ve created huge, luminous garbage installations and commemorated torn-down public pools with fiery blue liquid. Their works never stay on the street too long: “they take less than one hour to disappear”. A really nice project started, apparently, for the sole purpose of beautifying and adding a little wonder to their city. (via)

Amy Stein’s Photographs: Halloween On the Street and Animals in the Woods

 

These photographs are taken from two series by NYC  photographer Amy Stein: “Domesticated”, and “Halloween in Harlem”. The photos were put together a while ago now, but I’ve always loved them. And, as Ms. Stein seems to be dealing with an issue involving use of her work without permission and $40,000, I figured she deserved some love.

“Domesticated” depicts real stories ivolving animals and humans culled from local news stories. Stein used often used taxidermied animals in her perfectly positioned shots, which include bobcats confused by newfound construction and curious bears checking out backyard pools.

“Halloween in Harlem” is pretty straightforward: Stein’s eye set to run freely capturing the spirit of the holiday and creepy children in masks on the street.

Check out images from both series below.

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Grady Gordon’s Ghoulish Monotype Prints

 

 

Oakland-based artist Grady Gordon produces ghoulish black and white monotype prints. The knowledge that each image is unique contributes to a  sense that the figures depicted are real. That at any moment they could leave the paper and enter your nightmares. Until this year, Gordon only depicted heads in his work; the full figures definitely amplify the gruesome vibe. But the heads definitely have their appeal as well- leering faces that move in and out of swirling blacks. Gordon is having a solo show in Denver in October. Some of these works will be on view then.

The best way to stay current with the world of Grady Gordon is to follow the dude on instagram @joaquindead. Don’t blame me if you never sleep again though. More full figures and previews of the Denver show after the jump.

Bright Colored Silouettes In Vintage Photography t by Hayley Warnham

 

I like these digital collage works from British artist Hayley Warnham. Solid, bright color meets vintage 1940′s, 50′s, and 60′s personal photography in the pictures, which capture a nostalgic, innocent vibe. The use of flat color with found photography evokes the work of legendary American artist John Baldesarri. We wonder if he was a direct influence on Warnham. A lot of these are composed in such away that suggests the vantage point of a youngster, which reminds you of a time when things were much simpler. When skylines and relatives may as well have been flat blocks of color with very little texture as far as you were concerned. You didn’t yet grasp the complexities of every person and setting in your life, and everything was a mysterious wall of impenetrable brightness. (via)

Kristin Farr’s Colorful, Diamond-Patterned Paintings, Sculpture, and Installation

 

Been into Kristin Farr‘s colorful diamond patterns for a minute now. Farr’s work, which falls under many categories (painting, sculpture, crafts, music videos, animation), deals in themes of “nostalgia, humor, comfort, and folk magic” (she hipped me to Pennsylvania Dutch folk art hex signs- so rad). The artist has applied her colorful sensibility to vinyl record covers, suitcases, and various installation pieces, and is always looking out for a good opportunity to present her work in an outdoor context. In addition to her various eclectic interests, Farr is influenced by her experience with synesthesia, which totally makes sense when looking at her work. Head over to the Richmond, CA artist’s instagram to check out her cellphone “app art”, and click past the jump to see some what she’s been doing lately.

Kelsey Short’s Washed Out, Moody Silkscreens

 

Nice silkscreen work from California-based illustrator and comics artist Kelsey Short. I dig the muted palette full of green, black, and blue. It perfectly matches her washed out, moody style. A lot of Short’s work is like those rainy days where you’re not bummed that you can’t go outside because the quiet sound of the rain just matches your mood for some reason. Hit the tumblr over here for a little insight into Short’s process (artistic and otherwise), and grab yourself a copy of her zine, “Grid” and some prints at her Etsy shop.

James Bouché’s Dark Meditative Prints

 

MICA 2012 printmaking grad James Bouché is doing some really dark, meditative work touching on themes of history, death, and decay. Yeah- it’s something we’d like. Bouché’s lithographs and screen prints of desolate wastelands, crumbling artifacts, and dead soldiers hit the tone pretty well. There’s almost like an arcane magic at work here, as though the artist is in touch with the ancient Mayans, transmitting 2012 death knells via ink on paper. But even if such sinister implications are completely imagined, the works’ ability to generate them in the first place is pretty special. But I’m still hoping that James is talking to the Mayans anyway. That’d be pretty cool.

Angular Quasi-Taxidermy from Arran Gregory

 

London designer/artist Arran Gregory recently opened ”Wolf”, a solo exhibition of sculpture and illustration at Print House Gallery in London. The show features these reflective, mirrored wolf and rhinocerous taxidermy heads cut in angular geometry. The mirrors sort of remove the animal from the equation, leaving gallery patron staring back at his or herself, left to ponder our relationship with animals- dead and alive. The end result is kind of jarring, as though accountability for our own actions is a scarier concept then sharp teeth in open jaws. More pics below. (via)