Mircea Cantor’s Sculptures Are made out of Everything from Corn On The Cob To Aluminum Cans

 

Romanian Sculptor Mircea Cantor is all over the map as far as media goes. The artist has worked with everything from aluminum cans to model airplanes (see both images above). He’s even done some “finger painting”. But what seemingly remains a constant throughout all of his work is a disdain for doing what’s been done before. Check out more images of his sculpture after the jump, including corn on the cob installation and fishing hook fighter jets. Cantor is also a co-editor of VERSION magazine. (via)

Aron Wiesenfeld’s Emotional Paintings of Young Women

 

 Aron Wiesenfeld’s moody paintings of young women in desolate, unfortunate circumstances are close to being beyond reproach. The figures in these works -usually young and female- are characterized by a certain hardiness. Despite their thin frames, there seemingly isn’t any malevolent force (weather, isolation, disaster, etc.) in the world that can bring them down. Where others might place less significant elements in a corner to fill a canvas, each of Wiesenfeld’s brushstrokes seem to have a purpose. Each mark on canvas contributes to a stronger emotional impression overall. And that’s really what makes these so great. Sure they’re gorgeously rendered, but these paintings’ potential for emotional impact is their greatest strength.

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Lisa A. Frank’s Gorgeous Patternwork Drawn from Nature Photography

 

 ”Choosing to focus on natural elements that are not commonly appreciated or used for decorative purposes, my artwork is connected to the ‘wildness’ in nature even as it is taming it by the creation of formal patterning.”

Drawing on her background in textile design, Lisa A. Frank creates large-scale “repeating patterns”, “tapestry-like designs”, and “floor to ceiling ‘sections’” from her own nature photography. The artist’s works (some of which are composed of over 100 digital layers) obviously draw on a strong connection to nature and its various trappings: flaura, fauna, etc. Such elements are inherently wild and unpredictable. So Frank’s application of computerized media and pattern work, logical processes very unlike the mysterious mechanisms that govern the natural world, sets up a really interesting dynamic. And, like in the natural environment, there’s a lot going on in these works. The effort really shows and I could spend a long time looking at each one.

Great stuff. Definitely worth a click past the jump to check out more images of the artist’s work, which draws material from all four seasons.

Anne Lemanski’s Socially Conscious Sculpture of Animals

 

Anne Lemanski‘s sculptures of various animals done in unique textile surrounding a copper armature are rich in symbolism. An eagle is composed of stitched-together dollar bill designs, while a pigeon is put together with pieces of a service worker’s uniform. A water bird is made of slick, oily latex. The sculptures are great, and the social, political, and environmental commentary are a bonus. Lemanski’s work, which ”highlight[s] our admiration for animals as symbols, and our exploitation of them to suit our needs…” touches on a nice dichotomous conflict that adds some strong intellectual power to each piece. Coyotes, snakes, primates, and more after the jump. (via)

Abbey McCulloch’s Evocative Paintings of the Female Figure

 

Really nice work from Australian artist Abbey McCulloch. There’s almost a fashion illustration vibe with these paintings, which feature female figures staring at you from eyes weighed down with heavy makeup. And so often when an artist does cite fashion illustration as an influence, what they really mean is straight up fashion illustration placed in a gallery setting. That wouldn’t be the case with McCulloch’s work, whether she drew direct inspiration from the realm of fashion or not. Her palette selection is so good. And the expressions on her subjects’ faces, captured with  just a few brushstrokes, are uncommonly evocative. Click past the jump to see more. (via)

Liesbet Bussche Accesorizes the City with Oversized Jewelry Street Art

Liesbet Bussche is doing some really creative, involved work in the street right now. I really like her “Urban Jewellery” campaign, which integrates over sized pieces of jewelry into public, urban space. Stone roadblocks become cufflinks. Pendants are placed upon chain barriers to create “necklaces”. The project exposes the city’s characteristics as highly individual, asserting that it is appropriate to accessorize public space in the same manner we would accessorize ourselves. It reminds us that urban areas have just as much personality as a living, breathing entity. (via)

Robert Hardgrave’s Map Like Abstract Paintings

Seattle artist Robert Hardgrave creates swirling, abstract mixed media paintings. Sometimes a figure or structure will appear, but you can never be too sure of exactly what you’re looking at. Any element of order in each work is shrouded beyond most comprehension by beautiful chaos. Things are better off that way. And Hardgrave’s work is so textured and effortlessly intricate that all you want to do is swallow each painting whole. Who cares what a single brushstroke might mean? There’s too much going on not to take it all in at once. When you do get the chance to examine detail though, Hardgrave’s insane skill level is undeniable.

Yukinori Yanagi Uses Ants to Manipulate National Flags

 

 

Japanese artist Yukinori Yanagi uses a pretty unique technique in his work. For years now, he’s created custom ant farms with colored sand and used the natural lifecycle of ants to manipulate images rendered with the sand. His work using national flags is some of his best. Soviet banners assembled into a pyramid. Japanese Hinomaru fractured by tunneling ants. The strong symbolism inherent in banners and flags lends the work a lot of power. The ants show us that even things that once seemed unshakable are susceptible to decay and eventual ruin, even at the hands of seemingly tiny, insignificant forces. (via)