A Traveling Installation Series Inspired by Famous Works of Architecture

 

 

French artist Xavier Veilhan is staging a series of site-specific sculptural installations in various international, architecturally significant structures as part of a project entitled Architectones. To kick off the series, the artist is presenting works at the Richard Neutra VDL Research House in L.A. The works on view at the Neutra VDL Research House (exhibit closes September 16th) are inspired by modernity, Richard Neutra, and the house itself, where the artist stayed with his family while completing each piece in the show; an echo of Neutra’s family life. Curated by Francois Perrin, the exhibit features models of cars and boats, a metal flag, and more.

Over the next year, the VDL project will be followed by Pierre Koenig’s Case Study House #21 (1958); the roof of Le Corbusier’s Cité Radieuse, Marseille (1952), (set for spring 2013); St. Bernadette du Banlay Church (1966) by Claude Parent and Paul Virilio, Nevers, France; and the Melnikov House (1929) in Moscow. After the jump, more pictures of the show. (Photographs by Joshua White).

Michelle Fleck’s Pointed, Minimalistic Paintings of Man’s Effect on the Environment

San Francisco-based artist Michelle Fleck creates slightly minimalistic acrylic paintings that deal with the “relationship between man and the landscape”. In the paintings, decaying natural environments are sullied by the trappings of construction work and neglect. What’s great about these, in addition to Fleck’s nice illustrative sense of texture, is the artist’s intelligent handling of her subject matter. It’s so common, whenever drawing on environmental themes, to be heavy-handed. To sort of say, “I’m talking about the environment now, and it’s very important so look at what I’m doing.” Instead of taking that route, Fleck just paints what she sees (of course taking care to include pointed compositions and visual appeal). Some situations don’t need extensive commentary, just a skilled storyteller to show you just enough of what you need to know.

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Gal Weinstein’s Sculpture of Burning Tires, Explosions, and Wasteland

 

Gal Weinstein, based in Tel Aviv, does some really cool sculptures. Burning tires, mosaic explosions, sputtering chimneys- this stuff is hard to ignore. Some people feel that we’re closer to the apocalypse now then we ever have been, whether it’s brought on by our own means or otherwise. Weinstein’s work often illustrates a sparse, unforgiving wasteland full of smoke and red brick. Even the sculptures that depict elements of life are disconnected, removed. Farm plots are reduced to tiny, green squares. The closest we get to humans are rows of stoic Foosball figures. But somehow there’s still hope in the artist’s work, which holds color and intrigue. (via)

Far Out Digital Work and Collage by Lesser Gonzalez Alvarez

 

Lesser Gonzalez Alvarez, of Baltimore, produces sculpture, collage (see above), and illustration. But the majority of his fine arts output is done through digital media. His digital compositions aren’t really like any I’ve seen before. They combine a far out, cosmic sensibility with soft, colorful gradients and textures. I could meditate on these for a while. Some of Alvarez’ works are so simple, yet they maintain a lot of gravity, as though they hold something really important just beyond your grasp. And the creepy smiley faces he repeats throughout his work really get to me. Click past the jump for more collage, couches floating in space, and a workbench installation.

Graphic Street Art & Pop Remixes from Numskull

 

Australian artist Numskull presents his work both on the street and in galleries. His segmented use of vintage typography and Native American imagery is dangerously similar to that of FAILE’s mixed media work, but his energetic character designs establish him as a force all his own. Goofy gets three eyes and Bart Simpson hair, and the character takes on a completely new persona. Hysterical, almost toothless grins populate the streets. The world would be a better place if it was populated with even more visuals from the mind of Numskull.

The artist has work on display at Mishka‘s flagship in Brooklyn.

Tom Price’s Melted Plastic Concept Furniture and Sculpture

 

 

Tom Price melts a lot of plastic in his work. He bends the distinctly man-made material to his specifications, creating highly conceptual chairs, tables, trees, and other objects. It’s easy to see which aspects of Price’s sculptures are the result of his molten process, and some element of intense heat and power lingers long after required cooling periods. You can almost feel the plastics melting in your hands, and smell the awful scent of burning tar. Such lingering power is what makes these works so intriguing. They’re also beautiful, but who’s counting? (via)

Tierney Gearon’s Layered Fantasy-Inducing Photography

 

Take a gander at these layered, fantasy-inducing pictures from model-turned-photographer Tierney Gearon. Gearon has received a lot of attention in a short period of time for her multi-exposures that often feature members of her family. Some of these have a flawless capability for transportation, taking you to rural locales and private backyards that you feel like you’ve seen before. Maybe in a dream. Family, nature, adventure, love; a lifetime captured in one image. More after the jump.

Martin Heuwold Turns a Bridge in Germany into a Giant Lego Installation

 

Martin Heuwold (aka MEGX) of Wuppertal, Germany makes public art installations and murals. Heuwold created “Lego-Brücke”, or “Lego Bridge”- literally a functional bridge in Wuppertal made to look like giant lego blocks. The piece took 4 weeks to complete. It’s funny how really simple ideas like “Lego Bridge” actually have a really huge impact on our public spaces. Life becomes a little more pleasant when people take ownership of their daily environments and build stronger connections to their cities. All it takes is just a small, personal interest.