Lucy McLauchlan’s Work- Everything from Walls to Baby Clothes

 

 

Lucy McLauchlan of Birmingham, UK has been painting on every imaginable surface for over ten years. She has created everything from large murals to graphics for baby clothes. She usually works in flat black and white, depicting birds, trees, and whatever strikes her fancy. Most recently, she’s put up a lot of public work in East London, celebrating the Olympic Games. McLauchlan’s subdued compositions don’t scream “look at me!” (a message proliferated by  many “street” artists), but -instead- “look at this!”. Honest, pure beautification of our public urban space without any ego.

Video Watch: Fashion Designer Jeff Staple Interviews James Jean

James Jean is interviewed by NYC fashion designer Jeff Staple in this really nice video from a few months back that runs about 11 and a half minutes. Jean, the fairly prominent Los Angeles based illustrator and fine artist, opens up about his work and his time at SVA. Apparently, to get as good as Jean, you have to work pretty hard. Who knew?

Catch the full interview after the jump.

Advertise here !!!

Earthy Concept Item Engages All Five Senses

 

Central Saint Martins MA candidates Anita Silva and Leslie Borg designed an incredibly creative interactive product for Icelandair entitled “_scape”. Inspired by a rock found in Iceland, _scape is a layered “book” containing “sounds, visuals, textures, scents and tastes” which can serve as a reminder of Iceland itself, or just a general internal escape. Intended to evoke lava rock and ice (two strong elements of the Icelandic landscape), the object is earthy-looking, meant to strongly contrast with the sterile environment of an airplane cabin. I’m not sure a flight time long enough to allow me to grow bored of interacting with _scape exists. (via)

Photographs of Miniature Plastic People Interacting with the Nude Figure

 

Maybe a little exploitative but well done nevertheless, these shots from photographer Allan Teger are done in single exposures. Natural, bodily curves take the place of hilly landscapes as miniature  “people” go about their business perfectly naturally. A nice way to celebrate the human form through re-contextualization, or just pretty shots of naked people- what do you think? Whenever I see these little plastic guys being used in such a way, I always think of Slinkachu’s “Little People Project”. I guess this is a common thing now. But Teger’s been doing it for a while. (via)

Joe Sorren’s Soft Oil Paintings Capture the Mystery of Childhood

NYC via Arizona artist Joe Sorren creates oil paintings of idyllic children and their soft, forgiving companions. He  shares a similar palette with Dave Cooper, and both artists have also been represented, at one time or another, by the same gallery (Jonathan Levine in Chelsea, NYC). But that’s pretty much where the comparisons end. Where Cooper depicts hedonistic wood-nymphs frolicking in the woods, Sorren places children sitting on a blanket reading a book. The artist’s beautiful paintings show us that there is as much intrigue and mystery in the lighter (and perhaps also sad) elements in in life as there are in the dark, animalistic realm of self-serving greed. Sorren will hold a small solo show in Levine’s project room in December.

Thomas Poulsom’s Birds Made of Legos

 

Thomas Poulsom of Bristol, UK has a really nice flickr account full of creative creations using legos. The legos almost lend a really cool, pixelated quality to the 3-dimensional, playful works. Probably the best of the bunch are his series of birds. He’s done birds native to Britain and a tropical bird series as well. I think the reason why these come off so well is how life-like they are. Definitely not you average plastic bird. (via)

Makoto Azuma’s Incredible Art and Design with Plants.

“AMKK is a company developing the experimental creation by Makoto Azuma, a flower artsit, whose subject is flowers and plants. The activities of AMKK aim to increase the existential value of plants by finding out the most mysterious figure only owned by flowers and plants and converting it to the artistic expression.”

Makoto Azuma’s work with plants are really extraordinary. Using plastic and real materials, he crafts furniture, installation, and sculpture with a particular natural, earthy aesthetic. Chairs made out of artificial turf, installations of leaves that seem to endlessly fold into themselves, and human/tree pseudo-mutations are just a few of the things he’s done so far. Azuma also runs an haute couture flower shop (I didn’t know such a thing existed) called Jardins des Fleurs in Tokyo. (via)

Outdoor Landscape Installation from Andy Cao and Xavier Perrot

 

This is Red Bowl, an installation piece put on by Cao | Perrot studio (L.A./Paris) in Beauvais, France. The work draws its inspiration from hardship and pain (biblical lepers) but is actually quite pensive, complete with a small pond “covered with a veil of water lentils to create a soft green proliferating surface.” The concept of renewal comes forth pretty strongly as Red Bowl “recalls man’s moral dimensions and the belief in being able to purify the body of diseases by a bath of blood.” A couple more images after the jump but definitely take a look at what else is coming from this really nice landscape architecture studio. (via)