Interactive Sound Sculpture Pavilion for the Olympic Games

As part of Coca Cola’s Move to the Beat program for the 2012 Olympics, London design partners Asif Khan and Pernilla Ohrstedt put together the Coca Cola Beatbox pavilion in the Olympic Park, an interactive architectural installation composed of 200 translucent air cushions. The cushions respond to movement from pavilion visitors with sound and light, effectively remixing a track commissioned by the bottling company for the Games. Different areas in the structure emit various sports-themed sounds like sneakers squeaking on the court and recorded heart rates. This one’s probably not for the claustrophobic, but London is definitely the place to be right now. Concept sketches and more images of the musical pavilion after the jump. (via) Read More >

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Sandra Beer’s Nostalgic Illustration

 

I really like these illustrations from Sandra Beer of Frankfurt, Germany. They somehow have a dirty and nostalgic feel all at once. If I encountered the animals and youngsters of Beer’s portfolio in the real world, I wouldn’t know whether to go in for the hug or run to safety. Where others may have tried for crowd pleasingly cuteness on some of her subjects, Beer’s not afraid to bring out the ink splotches and faded palette. Also, this aesthetic carries throughout all of her work, including the digital stuff. (via) Read More >

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Masako Miki’s Delicate Animal Paintings

These works from Berkeley, CA artist Masako Miki (originally from Japan) are fairly on point. Delicately rendered animals exist naturally among fantastical environs full of color. The artist’s ruminations on time, life, death, and innocence would be a big pill to swallow if these paintings weren’t so damn pretty. And it’s not that this stuff hasn’t been done before (Josh Keyes, growing environmentalist concerns, etc.). But in this case cosmic elements enter the mix, allowing us to contemplate the issues of our small planet and the issues of “the Beyond” in one go. Read More >

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Origami Street Installation from Mademoiselle Maurice

Based in Paris, Mademoiselle Maurice creates colorful installations on the street by conglomerating a bunch of origami. A lot of “street artists” love to talk about how important the ephemeral nature of their work is. Well Mlle. Maurice’s delicate origami doesn’t look like it will last long in its original state. But somehow these works seem really natural in their setting, like a growth of delicate lichen on the shadowed side of a rock. It’s almost as if they appeared on their own. Be sure to check out her website for many more images and projects. (via) Read More >

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Andreas Frank’s Manipulated Photos Exhibited Underwater In A Sunken Ship

A little while ago, Andreas Frank took a dive down to the Gen. Hoyt S. Vandenberg, a  United States missile tracking ship that was recently sunk 7 miles off the coast of Key West, Florida in order to create an artificial reef. While he was down there, Frank, who is a successful commercial photographer, took pictures of the wreck. He used the resulting images as the basis for a series of digitally manipulated photos depicting various underwater happenings on the sunken ship. The cool part: he then staged an exhibition of the photos on the deck of the ship! Divers took in the exhibit in full scuba gear. I’m not sure that bobbing up and down under water is the best way to take in Frank’s work, but it is kinda cool. See more photos from the Vandenberg- Life Below the Surface show after the jump, as well as a video of divers checking out the pictures while down by the ship. Read More >

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Eric Nehr’s Egon Schiele-Inspired Fashion Shoot

Here are a few images from a 2009 fashion shoot by Eric Nehr modeled directly after the works of Egon Schiele. For some reason, these snaps expose Schiele’s notorious vanity even further. But of course no one does self portraits like he did, with his writhing, angular paintings full of turn-of-the-century angst. A nice tribute. (via) Read More >

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The Art Nouveau Sensibilities of Jugend Magazine

 

We’re not in the habit of sharing stuff that’s not contemporary here, but sometimes you come along something that shouldn’t be overlooked, as it seems relevant no matter when it was created, and could use a little more attention. Jugendstil, the German Art Nouveau movement, was named after the late nineteenth century literary magazine Jugend, which promoted the aesthetic within its pages and on its covers. If you’re looking for some fresh typography/design/illustration inspiration, check out this online resource, which contains lots of images from and info on the magazine. There’s even some Impressionistic stuff mixed with the Art Nouveau goodness, but it all comes off as really fresh. I wonder what Jugend, which didn’t make it out of World War II and Nazism, would be like if it were around today. Read More >

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Instant Hutong’s Colorful Blinking City Stencil Re-Imagines Maps and Urban Space

 

Blinking City is an ongoing project from Instant Hutong that challenges the traditional concepts involved in map making by re-imagining and creating new context around maps of downtown Beijing. Above (and after the jump), are a few images of a stencil piece created in conjunction with Blinking City. Bright colors bleed slightly into one another but maintain their own strength in an orbicular representation of a Beijing neighborhood. The project is awesome and full of good intentions. From the site: “The urban analysis provides the framework for a deeper and street related urban approach involving inhabitants and their lifestyle, in which experience, time, paths, observations, encounters and ideas become eventually as important as the built environment.” The Blinking City webpage, which has details on tons more Blinking City related stuff and other Instant Hutong projects, is really worth a click. (via) Read More >

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