Melted Wooden Picture Frames from Bonsoir Paris

 

These are amazing. Duramen is a series of wooden sculptures depicting melted picture frames from French design collective Bonsoir Paris. The level of craftsmanship with these handmade works (sculpted by Adrien Coroller) is tops. The dynamic in play between the fine wood used and the decaying, deathly manner in which it is presented nicely illustrates how even the most supple, healthy aspects of life can easily fall from grace. The picture frame reference is a nice touch, forcing us to call into question our very perception and take into account its tendency to directly affect the practical world. Bonsoir Paris, founded by Morgan Maccari and Remy Clemente, has only been around since 2010, but if they continue to push forward in a direction that allows for the production of more work of this quality, they should do fine. (via)

Dreamy Multiple Exposure Photographs by the Seven Fields of Aphelion

 

In addition to playing keys and synths in the popular Psych music outfit Black Moth Super Rainbow, Maureen Boyle (aka the Seven Fields of Aphelion) makes multiple exposure photographs that happen to correspond perfectly to the sounds of BMSR and her Seven Fields solo project. Dreamy, faded, and slightly off-kilter, the pictures are full of fantasy and Nature. You can buy jet prints of these at her Etsy page. There’s always been a bit of mystery surrounding Black Moth (what with the pseudonyms and everything), and this project fall somewhere along the same lines. But that’s okay. With photos as gorgeous as these (the prints are affordable too), there’s not really much that needs to be said.

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Ran Hwang’s Large, Zen-Infused Installations Made of Beads

Brooklyn based SVA grad Ran Hwang makes these huge, flowing sculptures with nothing but beads and pins! The uplifting, spiritual elements involved here work really well with the light, dispersed beads. You can almost see the birds’ wings flapping, and everything seems sort of frozen in time at some climactic, freeing moment. Obviously the Zen influence is deliberate. From the artist’s website: “The process of building large installations are time consuming and repetitive and it requires manual effort which provides a form of self-meditation. I hammer thousands of pins into a wall like a monk who, facing the wall, practices Zen.” I guess patience does pay off. (via)

Curtis “Talwst” Santiago’s Swagged Out Bossons Head Wall Masks

 

Curtis Santiago (Talwst) has created a series of wall-mounted relief masks out of altered Bossons heads. He has conspicuously attached shutter shades, Ray Bans, and gold fronts to the familiar, idiosyncratic mass-produced sculptures.  A modern take on 15th century Italian Death Masks, the works are Santiago’s farewell to certain aspects of “Swag Rap Culture” and other possibly misguided, recent advents of Popular Culture. Industrialization and watered down culture with Renaissance undertones? Pretty interesting. Talwst will be exhibiting his Swagged Out Bossons Heads at Fuse Gallery in NYC from August 15th through September 12th.

Yunwoo Choi’s Large Sculptures Made of Rolled Magazines

Yunwoo Choi, who holds two M.F.A.’s (one in Sculpture, one in Fine Art), creates large scale sculpture out of rolled up magazines. But that sounds so much more boring than what the artist’s work actually brings to the table. The magazines lend a chunky, geometric punch to the already weighted works that is hard to anticipate only from a textual description. So many magazines are used in each piece that the works almost buzz with a busy violence, which is weird when you consider that they only consist of a a bunch of newsprint. This contradiction calls into question conventional concepts of strength, weight, and coherence.  (via)

Video Watch: Bill Fick Interview and Printmaking Process Footage

 

As part of a summer workshop at Duke University’s Center For Documentary Studies, Frith Gowan and Ayanna Seals created a short film about printmaker Bill Fick. The video cuts back and forth between an interview with Fick and footage of the artist’s lino cut process. It’s always great to get a glimpse into a talented artist’s process, but the interview is really insightful as well. Fick, who features monsters and skulls pretty heavily within his work, speaks about what his subject matter might indicate about his personality, his interests, and his response to the world. He never takes himself too seriously though, which is nice to see. Watch the video after the jump. (via)

Olivier Garraud Creates an installation with rotting food, maggots, and flies

 

French artist Olivier Garraud has created Second Life, an installation that encapsulates the life cycle of flies in real time. The piece consists of two parts: an apparatus that allows flies access to food, and a tube filled with maggots and flies connected to an amplifier. Second Life allows us to examine the relatively short life-span of an insect on concise, bare bones terms, generating a context which can be applied to personal events. More images after the jump, and you can also check out a video of the installation in action here.

Challenging Architectural Installation from the Festival Des Architectures Vives

 

The Festival Des Architectures Vives, of Montpellier in Southern France, is an annual exhibition showcasing new talent in architectural installation. The Festival is currently in its 7th year. Here are a few images of some of the stuff that’s gone down. Repetition seems to be a popular theme this year, as many of the installations involved in the event feature identical or similar elements multiplied a few times over. The small alcove spaces that contain each piece work really well. They restrict the work just enough to create a slight amount of tension, but don’t distract from or impede any of the installations. See more from the show after the jump. (via)