Eric Shaw and Henry Gunderson at FFDG in San Francisco

Tom Betthauser:

Both artist’s work share an obtuse unearthly charm as a common language, and their work promises to have an energetic and productive conversation in their upcoming exhibition.

Great show up at FFDG in San Francisco right now. Eric Shaw and Henry Gunderson spent a couple weeks on the beast coast cooking up some vibey abstractions for us and now they’re ready to be seen! Both artist’s works definitely play off each other really nicely, and if you’re out in SF, this one is not to be missed. See more from the show below.

Images courtesy of FFDG.

Paul Chiappe’s Extremely Small Drawings of Vintage Photographs

Crazy small drawings from Edinburgh-based artist Paul Chiappe. Recreating graphite versions of early 20th century photography, the artist meticulously produces his works within tiny confines. Many of his drawings fall below the 4×4 cm. mark. Looking at the sad faces of our forebears given life by Chiappe’s drawings, you get the sense that they might easily have been forgotten by the world. His efforts celebrate those we’ve lost in a really unique way. Check out more below. (via)

Advertise here !!!

Sol Calero’s Neo-Folk Sculpture and Installation

Sol Calero‘s work investigates the ancestral through a visual language which includes fabric constructions, found objects and images, archives, painting and drawing.  Family clippings and photos overlap with house-plants and altered images of ancient ruins, tools for remembering and misremembering.  Her recent project “Column Study” includes research into the origins of found West German ceramics, notated on their bases, which are assembled and disassembled, unclear if they constitute an ancient column discovered by archaeologists or a domesticated kitsch Brancusi sculpture.  Her fabric works include capes used in abstract ritual performances and also wall pieces which operate in the vernacular of painting, often created with the discarded clothing of her family members.  The work is often balanced between worlds, warm traditions with cold minimalism, personal narratives with pages torn from children’s craft books, the hot chaos of Venezuela with the cold European winter.  Her project-based practice also includes running the gallery space Kinderhook & Caracas in Berlin with frequent collaborator Christopher Kline.

Cloud Made of Thousands of Lightbulbs at Nuit Blanche Festival in Calgary

Cloud is an installation piece from Calgary artist/filmmaker Caitlind Brown. The piece, part of the Nuit Blanche festival, involves 5,000 light bulbs, most of which are burnt out, that form a large cloud. Participants in the festival were able to pull on metal strings -rain- in order to illuminate sections of the “cloud”, giving off the impression of lightning. Imagine an entire landscape composed of lightbulbs- lightbulb sun, lightbulb trees, lightbulb mountains, etc. Lots of possibilities…

Click past the jump to see more photos of the piece. (via)

Danish Artist HuskMitNavn’s Goofy Characters On the Street and Indoors

Copenhagen-based artist and illustrator HuskMitNavn (RememberMyName) applies his tasty character work indoors and out. Whether in a gallery or on the street, his goofy characters are usually spot on. Here’s a small selection of what the guy’s been up to during the past few years, but I highly recommend checking out his site which is packed with images from past projects. Would love to see a collaboration between HMN and Malark.

Darren Goins Creates Abstract Works That Reference Computers and Digital Culture

NYC-based artist Darren Goins creates work that reference the language and aesthetics of computers and the Internet. Take, for example, these paintings done on the reverse side of acrylic panels. By forcing us to view the work from behind a layer of plastic, Goins invokes the same dynamic with which we relate to our various digital devices. And the inclusion of circuit board imagery and neon lighting further adds to this element. But Goins isn’t referencing computers solely out of celebration. He’s also trying to take back some energy and focus from the technologies that dominate our lives and put them in a place that’s maybe a little more worthy:

The computer and the web can be like a filter/lack thereof, depending on how it’s used. When I begin working on new ideas for a new art object, usually some web filter has subconsciously popped into my thinking patterns- history, current events, science and technology, popular culture- tend to pile up side by side- and this can create visual dialogue or a seemingly continuous deciphering of information that continues unhinged. This can be exhausting, and, so, I often try to exhaust all in art objects, which seems to be a better place for information to be stored.

 

See more acrylic panels after the jump, and head over to the artist’s site to see works on paper and some sculpture as well.

Jennifer Hudson’s Dark Staged Photography Explores the Quiet Side of the Soul

Eerie and dark staged photography from Jennifer Hudson. Hudson is a current MFA candidate at the University of New Mexico. She recently finished Medic, a series of photos exploring the breadth of human relationships during illness and recovery. Really dig the compositions with these and the cold sepia tone. The emotional content of each piece comes through really strongly even though her sensibility is slightly on the quiet side. A nice example of affective work that doesn’t need to hit you on the head to fully come across. Hudson says that her conservative, spiritual upbringing in rural Texas led her onto an “imaginitive, curious, and experimental” path. Definitely feeling that.

See images from Medic and Flora, another recent series from the artist, after the jump.

A Love Letter for You- Quasi-Documentary from Stephen Powers and Joey Garfield Re-Caps The Love Letter Project

On the heels of his current solo show at Joshua Liner Gallery, Steve “ESPO” Powers came through the Tribeca Grand Hotel with Joey Garfield for a screening of A Love Letter for You, their documentary/narrative film about the much-celebrated Love Letter mural project that went down in Philly about two years ago. The film brings ESPO and the Love Letter squad into a semi-fictional narrative surrounding a young writer’s quest to reach a special someone, and is a huge treat for any graffiti/mural/underdog fan. Put together with some archive ESPO footage, an original script co-written by Powers, and a killer shoegazey soundtrack, LL4U will hit you right in the heartstrings. No use even trying to fight it.

Until the film finds a much-deserved wider release, you can catch the trailer after the jump.