Catherine Nelson’s Incredible Digital Floating Worlds

Catherine Nelson is a visual artist who uses the digital medium to create orbital worlds of  imaginary landscapes. Her ‘Future Memories’ series comprises of 20 floating worlds, meticulously composed with thousands of assembled details. Visual poetry, nature photography and digital techniques blend together to give shape to these transcendental landscapes. The result is a contemporary pictorial mythology that subtly reminds the viewer of a profound truth: that it is in the flourishing variety of the local that the fate of the world resides.

Trained as a painter in Sydney and London and with years of experience in the creation of visual effects for feature films like Moulin Rouge and Harry Potter, she now has dedicated her skills to her own art work combining the techniques from both these worlds into a new contemporary art medium.

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SBAGLIATO’S Street Art Trompe- L’oeil Doors And Windows Into Nowhere

Italian street art group SBAGLIATO (meaning “wrong” in Italian) covers, buildings, walls, and the occasional rock with trompe- l’oeil  windows and doorways that beg viewers to walk and pear into places that we’re not supposed to look at.  Their execution is so precise that from a short distance it’s difficult to tell their work apart from a real window or door. So next time you’re late for a meeting and running towards a door make sure it’s not the newest piece by SBAGLIATO or you’re sure to be greeted with a sore forehead and a few chipped teeth. (via)

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Abstraction And Figuration Merge In Erik Jones’ Paintings

The disparate worlds of abstraction and figuration collide in the boldly colored paintings of Erik Jones. If those polar opposites weren’t enough Jones also tosses into the mix a healthy dose of organic and geometric mark making, creating explosive meditations on the human figure that at once feel analog and digital. (via)

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A Prison Is Converted Into The Gue(ho)st House

With the project “Gue(ho)st House”, French artist duo Berdaguer & Péjus  re-imagine an old French house into a fantastical architectural and sculptural visitor center. The artists used the structures rich history as inspiration (it was first a prison, then a schoolhouse and then a funeral home) to create what they describe as “Psychoarchitecture.” By covering  the house with an organic white veil that flows off the house and onto the surrounding grounds they play with the archeology of the building and its ghosts to create an architectural fantasyland. (via)

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Incredible Sculpture Makes Liquid Flow Backwards Into Oil Can- Or Does It?

Supermajor from matt kenyon on Vimeo.

For SWAMP’s piece Supermajor (a term used in the Gulf Coast referring to the six biggest publicly owned oil companies) the artist collective has created an ingenious and perplexing sculpture that will surely make you take a double take. In the gallery a wire rack of (vintage) oil cans sits.  One oilcan has a visible fissure out of which oil slowly flows cascading onto the pedestal and gallery floor…  The only thing is, the oil isn’t exactly flowing out of the can. Instead, oil appears to slow slowly drop by drop back into the can.  At times the drops of oil hover unsupported in midair. Other times the drops are in the process of a slow motion splash onto the pedestal. This is a piece that can only be fully appreciated in person or on video as the oil literally looks like it is moving backwards in time back into the can.

SWAMP (Studies of Work Atmosphere and Mass Production) was founded in 1999 by artists Douglas Easterly and Matt Kenyon. Focusing on critical themes addressing the effects of global corporate operations, mass media and communication, military-industrial complexes, and general meditations on the liminal area between life and artificial life.

Watch the video above and after the jump to see the piece in action! (via)

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A Sidewalk Transformed Into A Waterbed

La ville molle (part III) from Raum Raum on Vimeo.

Ever wonder what would happen if the ground you’re used to walking on had the consistency of a waterbed? Well French artist collective Raum has and decided to create a pavement that wiggles, waves and reacts to movement much liked the beloved 80′s bedroom staple, the waterbed. Collaborating with the National Art School of Bourges and the FRAC Centre, a slice of pavement-like material was filled with water on a regular street transforming the mundane patch of land into a fluid wonderland where every step meets not so stable reaction. The project, called “La Ville Molle” (The Soft City) questions the stability of the city and it’s ability to change and accommodate motion and evolution. We’re not sure if the world is ready for endless sidewalks filled with water just yet but this sure does look like a fun project that makes you rethink your environment and the permanent nature of the stable ground that we all take for granted.

Watch a video of the fluid “La Ville Molle” in action above and watch a short “making of” video after the jump to see how you can make your very own waterbed sidewalk! (via)

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Michael Johansson’s Tetris Like Sculptures And Installations

Swedish artist Michael Johansson is the Tetris master of art. His brilliant assemblages of found objects such as books, luggage and other everyday materials into tight geometric shapes is absolutely brilliant. Filling empty spaces in buildings, between shipping containers and entrances, Johansson transforms voids into color coordinated shapes of wonder. (via)

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Lisa Beck’s Rorschach Installations

Brooklyn, NY based painter and sculptor Lisa Beck creates reflective, Rorschach like abstractions that function simultaneously as murals, paintings, sculptures, and installations.

“My work has always been driven by certain preoccupations and obsessions, that can be seen as divided between the particular and the universal. The particular is shorthand for the observable aspects of reality, the stuff around us (the landscape, our bodies). The universal is a shorthand for things that are too vast or too tiny for us to grasp completely ( space, atomic physics)— that necessarily become a kind of abstraction. Those are the things that I think about, with an emphasis on the relationship between those things — the place where they meet or interact, rather than the divide. I’m concerned with where I stand, or where anyone stands, in relation to these aspects of existing reality … the act of observation of the place in between; visual awareness and perception as a way of understanding existence, like a filter.

I tend to be attracted to opposing but related visual phenomena like positive and negative, pattern and randomness, color and grayscale, flatness and depth, representational and abstract imagery. I always want to go in both directions a once and much of my work has involved trying to find ways to integrate these opposites. My most prevalent motif has been the circle in all its forms and references. Atoms, dots, spheres, solids, voids, cells, selves, stars, eternity, emptiness- it’s amazing how much can attach to this form.” (via)

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