Michal Macku’s Manipulated Gellage Self Portraits

Since the end of 1989, Michal Macku has used his own creative technique which he has named “Gellage” (the ligature of collage and gelatin). The technique consists of transfer the exposed and fixed photographic emulsion from its original base on paper. This transparent and plastic gelatin substance makes it possible to reshape and reform the original images, changing their relationships and endowing them with new meanings during the transfer.

“I use the nude human body (mostly my own) in my pictures. Through the photographic process [of Gellage], this concrete human body is compelled to meet with abstract surroundings and distortions. This connection is most exciting for me and helps me to find new levels of humanness in the resulting work.
I am always seeking new means of expression and, step by step, I am discovering almost unlimited possibilities through my work with loosened gelatin. Photographic pictures mean specific touch with concrete reality for me, one captured level of real time. The technique of Gellage which I am using helps me to take one of these “time sheets” and release a figure, a human body, from it, causing it to depend on time again. Its charm is similar to that of cartoon animation, but it is not a trick. It is very important for me to be aware of the history of a picture and to have a sense of direct contact with its reality. My work places “body pictures” in new situations, new contexts, new realities, causing their “authentic” reality to become relative. I am interested in questions of moral and inner freedom. I do what I feel, and only then do I begin to meditate on what the result is. I am often surprised by the new connections I find in it. Naturally, I start out with a concrete intention, but the result is often very different. And there, I believe, lies a hitch. One creates to communicate what can not be expressed in any other way. Then comes the need to describe, to define.” (via)

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Amy Feldman’s Mostly Black And White Abstractions

Sometimes simplicity is key such as in the paired down color schemes and minimal compositions of Amy Feldman’s paintings. Through subtle color shifts and iconic geometric imagery Feldman gets us  to look a little bit closer at all the variations in the color black and the beautiful imperfections of the human hand.

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David Mach’s Massive Magazine installations

David Mach‘s incredible installations spill and pour into the spaces they inhabit with the fluidity of water and the compositional precision of a laser. Created out of discarded magazines and other found objects these larger than life installations take over entire buildings in every shape possible  from immense columns to organic round piles of mass that pick up everything in its path. (via)

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Stunning Portraits of Albinos by Gustavo Lacerda

As part of our ongoing partnership with Feature Shoot, Beautiful/Decay is sharing Alison Zavos’ article on Photographer Gustavo Lacerda.

It’s a common myth that all albinos have red eyes, a myth easily dispelled by these stunning portraits by Gustavo Lacerda. Since 2009 Lacerda, a São Paulo-based fine art photographer, has been researching and approaching albinos to photograph in his studio.

Many of his subjects, used being treated as ‘outsiders’, were initially uncomfortable with the process but later felt great pride after seeing the results.

This series has been making the rounds online and three of Lacerda’s images were featured in the Pirelli/Masp Photography Collection, which honors excellence in the Brazillian photography community.

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Documentary Watch: Allison Schulnik Studio Visit

 

Allison Schulnik Beautiful/Decay Studio Visit from Beautiful/Decay Magazine on Vimeo.

The Queen of lush and juicy paint Allison Schulnik opened up her studio to Beautiful/Decay and Visual Creatures to give our readers insight into the world of sad hobo clowns and her painting and animation process. Allison discusses how her paintings inform her animations and vice versa, the long history of artists in her family, and how Los Angeles allows artists to have quiet time in the studio yet have a community.

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Mathilde Roussel’s Falling Grass and Paper Figures

Mathilde Roussel is a French artist based in Paris. Her work is a sensible and symbolic research about the nature of physical life. She is interested in the cyclic metamorphoses that transform organic matter, whether vegetable, animal or human. Furthermore, Roussel interrogates the ways in which time weighs on our body, leaving its traces as an imprint and thus creating an invisible archive of our emotions, a mute history of our existence. To do this, she uses a diversity of materials from paper to fabric, from rubber to graphite. For some of her ephemeral sculptures she uses organic matter such as wheat grass, pollen, sap or milk. Her work becomes a mapping of the body, an anatomy of the time and space inhabited by our fragile presence in the world.

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Troy Emery’s Wild Animals Created Out Of Craft Materials

Australian artist Troy Emery’s practice is an ongoing project of producing a series of artworks that investigate decoration and the aesthetics of craft associated with natural history and the animal form . In his sculpture practice, taxidermy foam bodies are covered in bright polyester pompoms and craft textiles such as tassle fringing. The artworks, non-descript predator animals with their playfully colorful pelts, become hyper exotic specimens in a menagerie of art / animal objects.

Watch a fantastic short documentary on Troy Emery after the jump.

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Paul Cherwick

Paul Cherwick approaches his subtractive wooden sculptures with the spontaneity of drawings, treating them as quick, multi-sided one-offs. Employing a carving technique, he chooses an art that runs the gamut, unchanged between folk art material, and the stuff of priceless antiquities. Cherwick creates his figures as allegories, each with an absurd background story; they show the classical grace of the commoner, rather than his or her banality. His cast of personal folklores draws from Classical Greek mythology, in which individuals serve as tropes, created to personify human qualities in ways that are often very literal. Though he is drawn to wood for its classical nature and inherent morality, his translations of the material often verge on Pop.

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