Cradle of Mankind – The Tribes of Ethopia & The birthplace of Homo Sapiens

Cradle of Mankind is the newest series by Canadian-born photographer, Joey L. Shot in Ethiopia’s Omo Valley, and featuring portraits of the various tribes that inhabit the area. The photographs are a deeply moving, visual homage to the tribal peoples of Ethiopia, the birthplace of Homo sapiens.

The photographs from Cradle of Mankind, along with Joey L.’s documentary film, Faces of a Vanishing World (watch the trailer after the jump)– which first aired on Ovation TV in September 2010, chronicle the artist’s deep interest in Ethiopia, and the rapid transition of it’s oldest cultures. During his time in the country, Joey L. lived with various tribes in the region, learning the different customs of each while capturing individual portraits. Though these tribes may seem untouched by time, they are in fact in constant danger of disappearing forever. The artist states in a 2010 NPR interview that he is interested in anthropology and likes photographing different cultures, “but the ones I’ve been paying attention to lately are the, I suppose what you’d call vanishing ones, … the cultures that are on the verge of extinction, tribes that are threatened by progress and losing their language and losing their ways of life that they’ve sustained for thousands of years.”

See a selection of Cradle Of Mankind from June 21st-August 4th 2012 at Stephen Cohen Gallery in Los Angeles

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Jaime Zuverza’s Lo-Fi Retro Rock Posters

I always see those “Keep Austin Weird” stickers everywhere and now that I’ve seen the work of Jaime Zuverza it all makes sense. This Texan illustrator/designer’s lo-fi sensibility mixed with ironic retro imagery is the stuff that’s dreamed of for rock posters. Each mixed media poster is magnificently stranger than the last proving that Jaime is doing his part to keep thing pretty damn weird in Austin!

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Stickerobot X Beautiful/Decay Discount Code!

Recently Beautiful/Decay teamed up with our good friends over at Stickerobot.com to print a few new custom stickers and boy did they come out great. We’ve been working with Stickerobot for many years and we love their high quality full color vinyl stickers that hold up whether they are stuck indoors or out. To celebrate the awesome new batch of stickers we just got in we’ve teamed up with Stickerobot.com to bring you a special 10% off code exclusive to Beautiful/Decay readers. Simply visit their site, order your custom vinyl sticker in any size (did I mention you can do full color stickers!), and use the discount code BD10 at checkout  to save some cash on your next batch of stickers! Check out more examples of high quality stickers and their many artist collaborations after the jump!

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Lorenzo Vitturi’s Hand-Made visions of the world

Italian photogprapher Lorenzo Vitturi describes his work as “hand-made visions” where each body of work consists of a completely constructed new world where each visual element is hand crafted  with the utmost attention to detail. For his latest project Anthropocene Vitturi created a strange industrial world filled with debris, strange colored horses, and surreal body builders. Vitturi say’s about this project:

“This project is the result of a reflection about the relationship between man and nature, as it proposes – in line with 16th Century naturalistic painting – a symbolic system able to visualize the intersection between this two dimensions.
Up to the early 20th Century nature had been represented as an unspoiled, pure space animated by uncontrollable forces;
today, after just one Century, nature has proved to be a fragile system whose survival is highly dependent on an increasingly pervasive and destructive anthropization.
In such a context, where all equilibria and “rules of the game” are being overthrown, how can we still depict nature and men? Nature is loosing its natural features, while men are increasingly taking control over the whole cycle of life.
Starting from this paradox, my project consists in a series of images where site-specific installations built within a derelict location play a central role. In this visions the “mis en scene” becomes a tool for representing a nature which appears less authentic and indeed more and more a cultural product.
Each image is the result of a meticulous process of scene design and construction. The materials used were scattered construction and industrial remains, natural pigments and fake plants.”

See more images from Anthropocene and some very nice behind the scenes photos of the construction of the shoot after the jump!

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Studio Patten’s Typographic Illustrations

Madrid based design studio Patten pushes typography and playful layout to the forefront of all their work regardless of whether they are creating bold digital illustrations that jump off the page or delicately drawn fashion illustrations by hand.

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Deenesh Ghyczy’s Fragmented Figures

Deenesh Ghyczy’s fragmented figurative paintings take the human figure and weave it in and out of itself as if dozens of film negatives were laid on top of one another to create a constant state of motion. This technique serves as a metaphor for multi-layered identity and a look at individuals as living structures with more than one center. (via)

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Hsiao-Ron Cheng’s Surreal School Time Fantasies

 

Taiwan based Hsiao-Ron Cheng’s work alludes to the deformation that physically separates humans from plants and animals. The environments and situations that she paints are often surrealist  in nature nature, reminiscent of her life as a student in school, and partly based on fantasy. Hsiao-Ron’s aim is to create more complex worlds with complicated stories of childlike and cruel creatures, showing the fragility of life.

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The Last Days Of Christ Reanacted By An Entire Town In Mexico

On top of the Sierra Madre mountains of Mexico there is a town called Taxco where literally everyone participates in a massive reenactment of the  last days of Christ with elaborate costumes, processions, and scary hooded men that look more like klansmen than holy men. Photographer Paul Alexander Knox has documented this bizarre religious parade in all its glory complete with Roman soldiers, Judas, baby angels, and of course virgin girls.

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