Monica Rohan Paints Self-Portraits Being Swallowed Up By A Beautiful Vortex Of Patterned Fabric

Rohan11Rohan10Rohan12

Monica Rohan paints realistic self-portraits where she is covered, buried, and engulfed in fabric. Although we see the artist portrayed in many different setting in her paintings, we can never see her face. Each of her subjects, all being representations of herself, hide their face in the mass of textiles. Rohan beautifully depicts different types of fabric, vivid in color and pattern. She is a master at bringing to life vibrant hues on different thread. Sometimes, there is no fabric in her paintings, but instead a sheet of grass or a plethora of flowers that stretch over the figure. Each sheet or quilt wraps around the figures, surrounding them as it moves across the composition. Although Rohan’s work appears lighthearted and playful at first, with frolicking and mischievous women, there is a level of anxiety present in her work. Each figures seems to be frantically attempting to hide their identity, almost desperately trying to hide. Mountains of patched fabric and colorful silk are swallowing up the artist’s likeness, sometimes consuming two figures at a time.

Monica Rohan, originally from Australia, is inspired by her upbringing in the remote countryside of Queensland. A sense of isolation can be felt in her paintings, as the only person present in her work is the artist herself. You can feel the artist’s emotions about to burst out of the many folds of the fabric as they create a powerful vortex of movement around her own self. (via Hi-Fructose)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Edith Waddell Creates Hallucinatory Symmetry With Feminine Motifs And Hybrid Botanicals

Edith Waddell - AcrylicEdith Waddell - AcrylicEdith Waddell - AcrylicEdith Waddell - Acrylic

Edith Waddell’s vibrant, surreal paintings form beautiful, symmetrical imagery filled with otherworldly flora and fauna. Her work combines feminine motifs, strange creatures, and delicate, pastel colors to create hybrid imagery. Full of symbolism and feminine spirituality, Waddell’s work does not just depict elements of the natural world, but the emotional, inner self. Her choice of colors seem to glow in neon hues, creating intense visuals that almost seem hallucinatory. Each composition blooms in beautiful symmetry, as they resemble inkblots tests one might see at a psychiatric exam. This resemblance reflects upon our inner psyche, as Waddell often pulls inspiration from imagery often found in her dreams. Many of her compositions resemble the female anatomy, with heavy maternal symbolism expressing the womb. Although whimsical and vivacious, there is an element of darkness that can be found in her work, like the reoccurring skull and the all-seeing eyes. There is a conflicting nature present, as there are elements of life in her budding flowers, but also death in the skulls and bones.

Originally hailing from Peru, Edith Waddell is now based out of LA. She is an artist of many talents, as she not just a painter, but an illustrator and printmaker. She often combines collage, digital, and traditional paintings to create her crossbred, botanical imagery.

“My goal is to make visible that which is overlooked, confronting the public with the dark and mysterious aspects of their own psyches, emotional struggles, and their relationship with the natural environment. My work is an invitation to make an introspective examination and reflection into our own existence, both physical and spiritual.”

-Edith Waddell

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Jay Mohler Creates Fantastic Eyes Of God Weavings In Brilliant Colors

Jay Mohler - Weaved YarnJay Mohler - Weaved YarnJay Mohler - Weaved Yarn

Jay Mohler creates intricate, textile designs, weaving different colored yarns to create brilliant Mandalas. His geometric patterns create Ojos de Dios, Spanish for eyes of God, that are either eight sided of twelve sides, spanning up to over a foot. Mohler began hand-making his Ojos de Dios over 40 years ago, after he traveled to Guadalajara, Mexico in 1965. At a marketplace there is where he first saw these fantastic, small-scale weavings. He was extremely impressed by the complex patterns and how often they would be created from a single strand of yarn, crossing and looping over the wooden sticks that hold it all together. The beautiful Ojos de Dios can be found in many cultures, traditionally in Native American and Mexican as well as Tibetan, where they can hold spiritual elements. They are also a symbol of a physical eye, as the designs of the weavings revolve around the center “eye.”

Based out of North Caroline, Jay Mohler uses wool yarn in all types of colors, including metallics, to carefully weave his vibrant creations. You can buy an Ojos de Dios for your own on his Etsy page, where you can also order custom made patterns and even buy a DIY kit to make your own. Make sure to check out more of his weavings to see the scale and size of his many creations. (via The Jealous Curator)

Currently Trending

David Samuel Stern Physically Weaves Portraits Together, Showing Two Different Sides Of His Subjects

David Samuel Stern - Woven Photographic Portrait David Samuel Stern - Woven Photographic Portrait

Brooklyn based artist David Samuel Stern takes still photographs, and fuses them together so that they appear to be in motion. He begins by taking two portraits of the same person, and then carefully and meticulously cuts them apart before physically weaving them back into one another. This not only creates amazing texture and an interesting checkered pattern, but combines physical features until the composition.

become a hybrid of two faces. With a light and airy palette, these breathtaking photographic prints become ghosts of themselves, two versions or the same person. Two different emotions are often present, creating an interesting dichotomy of the internal character. We are seeing two sides of the subjects, as the weaving alters and skews our perspective. Stern’s highly original technique abstracts the portraits so that they seem to be caught in mid motion. Both original images become blurred after they are combines by weaving. The once crisp photographic prints are transformed by their alteration, creating a painterly atmosphere. David Samuel Stern’s method is simple yet powerful, exposing two sides of each of his subjects. However, the abstraction present in his work also hides elements and details of the portraits as well.

You can see David Samuel Stern’s mesmerizing, photographic work on view at the BAM Harvey Theater in New York City from September 16 through December 20th.

Currently Trending

Jake Fried’s Animations Created With Only White Out And Ink Will Leave You In A Psychedelic Trance

NightVision3

Artist Jake Fried is at it again, creating mind-blowing drawings, paintings, and animations full of intense, psychedelic imagery. We are huge fans of the artist, as we have covered him previously, and now he has created even more amazing works in his new animation titled Night Vision. Made from hand drawn animation with ink and white out, Fried constructs complex worlds of intricate shapes transforming into landscapes, turning into an endless see of mind-bending imagery. Each section of his animations is one masterpiece turning into another, compiling onto one another until you are overwhelmed with imagery, sucked into a world of the artist’s endless imagination. We are held in a trance-like state, mesmerized by the impressive illustrations unfolding and collapsing right before our eyes like a strange and wonderful hallucination.

These animations unfurl and develop like a story, transporting us to different worlds full fantastical transitions. His morphing man in the animation Raw Data, takes us through a journey of this being as he grows different arms and his body transforms completely. In Jake Fried’s piece titled The Deep End, made from ink, whiteout, and coffee, another being is present and is pulled from the underground and flooded with different colors until, by the end of the animation, there is nothing left. Jake Fried’s work transformative and original, leaving us in awe at the intricate layering and alterations that take place in his monumental work.

Currently Trending

Meredith Woolnough Embroiders Complex Patterns Found In The Fragile Beauty Of Coral, Lily Pads, And Flower Petals

Meredith Woolnough - Embroidered ThreadMeredith Woolnough - Embroidered ThreadMeredith Woolnough - Embroidered ThreadMeredith Woolnough - Embroidered Thread

Australian artist Meredith Woolnough uses embroidery to create her delicate and intricate depictions of different plants. With some thread and a sewing machine, she forms different complex patterns found in nature, such as the veins of a leaf, patterns found in coral, and even lines and shapes found in red cabbage. Each fragile piece displays the small beauty found in the fine details of nature. What would be small, fragile beauty that the average person may overlook, Woolnough finds inspiration. Patterns from shells, petals, and lily pads are given new life in each breathtaking piece. The artist treats her artwork like specimens, as she carefully pins them under glass in shadow boxes for display.

Using vibrant colored thread, she builds up a density of embroidered patterns that become almost three-dimensional. In some cases, like in her embroidered bowls, the work really does have volume as it holds the shape of a bowl. Because of the method in which the artist creates her work, it demands an intense patience that can be seen as meditative. The repetitive patterns and natural quality of Woolnough’s work is like that of a Mandala, holding sacred qualities.

The work maps the frameworks of the various veining systems found in nature to create work that explores the balance, harmony and connectivity of life on Earth. Inspired by the patterns, structures and shapes found in plants, coral, cells and shells Meredith’s embroideries represent both the robust beauty and elegant fragility of life.

Currently Trending

Nathalie Lagacé Renders Delicate Creatures Stuck Between Human And Beast

Nathalie Lagacé - GraphiteNathalie Lagacé - GraphiteNathalie Lagacé - Graphite

Nathalie Lagacé renders hybrid creatures that are both beautiful and hideous, half human and half beast. Her beautifully rendered drawings display tenderness and anguish, as she lovingly creates these intriguing creatures. However, they are stuck somewhere in limbo, between two beings as they cry out. Highly skilled at drawing, Nathalie Lagacé forms very believable creatures, which make them all the more disturbing. These seemingly cute babies become alarming with their pig heads and rat-tails. Perhaps the most shocking image is Lagacé’s drawing of a baby with bird legs, but they appear to be cooked, ready for you to pick right off the body. Lagacé has created a series that will not soon leave your mind, as the strange images of these bizarre creatures are unlike any that you will ever see.

This series, titled Legacy, points a stern finger at the way we impact the world around us. Much of her work is strongly environmental, displaying what our actions could possibly cause in the future. These crossbreeds of animals like zebras, pigs, and rabbits with humans represent our “legacy,” what we leave behind. The artist’s work reflects upon nature and our relationship with it, the positive and negative. Her art is full of harsh contrasts, whether it is between two conflicting creatures or the dark graphite against the stark white background. Make sure to check out her other black and white, graphite drawings, which have a similar environmental message. (via Hi-Fructose)

Currently Trending

Devin Yalkin’s Photographs Of Illegal Fight Nights In NYC Get You Up Close And Personal Into The Ring

Anthony and other boxer connecting punches. (Old Fire House Soho, February, 2012)

Anthony and other boxer connecting punches. (Old Fire House Soho, February, 2012)

The crowd consisting of a large number of Charlie’s friends celebrate as Charlie wins his match. (Old Fire House Soho, September, 2012)

The crowd consisting of a large number of Charlie’s friends celebrate as Charlie wins his match. (Old Fire House Soho, September, 2012)

Two boxers pair up before their match. (Old Fire House Soho, September, 2012)

Two boxers pair up before their match. (Old Fire House Soho, September, 2012)

Ring girl entertaining the crowd in-between rounds. (Old Fire House Soho, February, 2012)

Ring girl entertaining the crowd in-between rounds. (Old Fire House Soho, February, 2012)

Photographer Devin Yalkin points an unflinching eye to the underground world of illegal fight nights, capturing their raw intensity. These “Friday Night Throwdowns” happen in secret locations and venues all over New York City. In Yalkin’s series The Old One Two, this hidden world is revealed through intimate, black and white photographs with a Film Noir flavor to them. This powerful series gets you up close and personal to the fighters and the erupting crowd cheering them on. The compositions in this series can be as hazy and chaotic as the fight itself, capturing the true atmosphere of these fight nights. You can see the unrefined aggressiveness and brutality between the fighters, but also feel the excitement and energy from the audience.

Devin Yalkin allows us to take place of the spectator, seeing every bead of sweat and drop of blood on the skin of the fighters. The high tension and motion happening during these Friday Night Throwdown’s can be felt in each photograph. It is as if we are standing next to each eccentric character; the screaming fan, the eager fighter, or the elusive woman in lingerie whose role is somewhat unknown. All of the individuals shown in Yalkin’s series seem to come from all walks of life, having only the love of the fight connecting them.

Make sure to check out Devin Yalin’s new strange and beautiful series Abductions, which captures ominous scenes of which we cannot place, mysterious and alluring.
(via Featureshoot)

Currently Trending