Violently Chaotic Installation Using Over 3 Miles Of Black Tape

Monika Grzymala installation1 SONY DSC

Monika Grzymala installation2

We’ve seen innovative art made from tape before.  The work of Monika Grzymala, though, is ambitious, seemingly chaotic, and even violent.  Using over three miles of black tape, Grzymala inundate’s the gallery space.  The tape wraps around corners and seems to splatter on to the wall as if it were liquid.  Grzymala’s work adds dimensionality to a usually flat material in a way that is surprising and nearly disturbing.  By appearing to forcibly occupy the gallery space, the installation compels the viewers to interact with the space in a new way.

Beautifully Lit Heaps Of Trash At Night

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Benoit Paille photography10

There’s something at once lighthearted and sad about Benoit Paillé‘s photographs in the series Jour du Déménagement (translates from French as “Moving Day”).  Discarded furniture, boxes, mattresses and other household items sit in piles waiting to be picked up by the garbage truck.  The photographs are taken in the dark, seemingly in the middle of the night, and the trash lit by a single bulb.  Little attention is paid to garbage on the curb; at night while everyone is sleeping it’s completely forgotten.  Regardless, items we’ve lived with often for years quietly sit there all night.  The scene is reminiscent of food in the refrigerator, and wondering what happens when the door closes and the light goes out.

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Witty And Humorous Conceptual Installations

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Ole Ukena installation8

 

The conceptual installations of artist Ole Ukena have a certain subtle humor.  However, the installations don’t seem intentionally funny as much as the surprising innocence of a young insight.  Each installation seems to pose a simple question that isn’t easily answered.  Appropriately, Ukena is also the founder of a foundation that organizes collaborations between artists and youths worldwide.  Ukena says of his process;

“I am not limiting myself to one medium. I simply can’t. It’s a constant adventure, finding new materials in the countries in which I travel, encountering objects or phrases that can be transformed into specific, meaningful pieces. While my work often displays a strong conceptual nature, I am also very drawn to the intuitive.This balancing energy forces me to step out of my mind and just create. These forces are like my left and right hand. My works try to create a map of the human mind, in an attempt to tell a tale about the very nature of it with all its possibilities, limitations, irritations, and hopes.”

10 Street Art Images You Need To See

Justin Nether

Justin Nether

Pasha183

Pasha183

Insa

Insa

Each week we’re bringing to you ten street art images culled from the internet that you definitely need to see.  This week we have pieces of two current event pieces: one of Trayvon Martin by Justin Nether, and another touching on Edward Snowden by PosterBoy.    There’s also pieces that will mess with your perspective from artists Meres and Atou.  You’ll also find an awesome GIF/Mural hybrid from INSA, an actual fiery torch holding mural by Pasha183, and a pizzeria cloning mural from Escif.  Finally check out a wonderfully creepy piece from Dan Witz and entire two story painted gold and covered with a mural by the Hygienic Dress League.

Colorful Abstractions Transformed Into Street Art

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Xuan Alyfe street art8

Xuan Alyfe street art7

The pieces of Xuan Alyfe arrive from a variety of influences rarely found in street art.  His work is largely abstract, but peppered with figures and other recognizable objects.  The murals seems to subtly reference minimalist, surrealist, and even graphic design styles.  Aylfe’s art even seems to piece together various influences of other street artists into his own distinct style.  Perhaps appropriately, then, he has exhibited and painted murals worldwide.

Assembly Line Creates Product That Only Functions To Choreograph The Assembly Line

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75 Watt – trailer from COHEN VAN BALEN on Vimeo.

Experimental design/art studio Cohen Van Balen‘s new project 75 Watts features an actual factory, assembly line, and workers.  However, the product the assembly line workers are constructing does absolutely nothing.  Well, almost nothing.  The purpose of the product is simply to choreograph the movements of the workers as they construct it.  75 Watts illustrates the complex dance of production, consumption, and the human relationships therein regardless of the product.  The project received its name from a rather creepy quote from the book Marks’ Standard Handbook for Mechanical Engineers: “A labourer over the course of an 8-hour day can sustain an average output of about 75 watts.”  Check out the video to see the dance of the pointless product.

Lee Hadwin Creates Art While Sleepwalking

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Lee Hadwin drawing5

Some artists are so talented they seem to be able to do it in their sleep.  Lee Hadwin, though, can only do it in his sleep.  Since he was an early teenager, Hadwin would draw or paint on tables, walls, clothes all while sleep walking.  While awake he would show no sign of interest or talent in art making.  Now Hadwin is prepared at night – he sets art materials aside before going to bed.  Much of his work is elegantly simple, while other pieces are strangely intricate.  Peculiar symbols and recurring shapes seem to appear in much of his work making one wonder whats going on in the mind of sleeping Lee Hadwin.

Glitch Art Transformed Into Blankets And Tapestries

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Phillip Stearns textiles4

New Media artist Phillip Stearns contrasts two mediums in a way that also conjures unexpected similarities.  Stearns has considerable experience with glitches – he’s the author of a Tumblr blog that presented a different glitch screen shot each day.  He went on to combine the cold digital spattering of glitches with warm textiles such as blankets and tapestries.  The pixels translate strangely well from screen to weave, the glitches not being lost in translation from one medium to the other.  Stearns says about his project:

“The Glitch Textiles project was started in 2011 with the goal of exploring the intersections of textiles and digital art. The idea was simple: Transcode glitches in the cold, hard logic of digital circuits into soft, warm textiles.  Following a successful funding campaign on Kickstarter in 2012, Glitch Textiles has grown to include a range of woven and knit wall hangings and blankets whose patterns are generated using images taken with short circuited cameras and other unorthodox digital techniques, including data visualization aided by the use of tools developed for digital forensics.”