A Digital Clock Made Up Of 288 Analog Clocks

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A million times (Time Dubai) by Humans since 1982 from Humans since 1982 on Vimeo.

A Million Times by the Stockholm based studio Humans Since 1982 beautifully mixes the analog and the digital.  The piece begins with the simple analog clock as its starting point.  288 clocks are arranged on the wall, their hands spinning to run through hypnotic patterns and display the time digitally.   Each of the 288 clocks’ two hands  run independently, powered by 576 individual motors.  The entire installation is connected to custom made software and operated from an iPad.  Watch the dials spin in the video after the jump.

Christopher Boffoli’s Giant Food World And Its Tiny Residents

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Photographer Christopher Boffoli continues his popular his Big Appetites series.  The series of photographs captures tiny people living in a giant culinary world.  These inhabitants explore, work, and even get into trouble with their huge food surroundings.  Despite its whimsical appearance, the series has a more serious grounding.  Big Appetites reflects America’s complex relationship with food.  The consumption of food – not only by eating it, but by reading and watching television about it – is ubiquitous, as if we lived in a giant world of food.

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Mini Tokyo Comes Alive With 3D Mapping Projection

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This miniature city is a carefully modeled Tokyo at 1:1,000 scale.  The Roppongi Hills skyscraper, dominant in the Tokyo skyline, celebrates its 10th anniversary by creating this model titled Tokyo City Symphony.  In addition to being intricately detailed, the model Tokyo is accompanied by a 3D mapping projection set to a corresponding soundtrack.  The projection brings the metropolis to life adding an impressive level of reality to the tiny Tokyo.  Check out the video to see Tokyo City Symphony in action.

Paper Cut Figures from Giant Sheets Of Paper By Nahoko Kojima

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The intricate work of Nahoko Kojima is created from single painstakingly cut sheets of paper.  For example, her newest sculpture, Byaku, is cut from a single giant sheet of Japanese washi paper.  Using a simple X-Acto knife like scalpel Kojima tirelessly works to pull the image out of the paper.  In order to maintain precision, she is said to change her blades about once every three minutes.  Kojima’s multilayered work also inhabitants a playful space between 2D and 3D.  At times her work is framed like a painting while other times presented like a sculpture.    [via]

Surreal Photographs Of Twins Monette And Mady In Paris

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Photographer Maja Daniels‘ series Monette & Mady captures Paris’ enigmatic twins.  The series shifts between staged and candid scenes of the twins’ life in the city.  The photos reflect the public and private personas of Monette and Mady.  Paris provides the ideal setting for the dramatic nature of siblings.  Really, the series centers around the twins’ relationship.  Daniels says of Monette & Mady:

“This series is an intimate journal of their togetherness and as an alternative take on the complex issues that accompanies the notion of “aging” today, I aim to pursue this series over the years as Mady and Monette grow older.”

Paper Animal Insides by Wendy Wallin Malinow

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The paper cut pieces of Wendy Wallin Malinow reveal the deeper goings-on of animals.  Malinow’s pieces are cut to expose an x-ray type view of various forest and ocean animals.  In addition to the bone structure, a meal is visible inside each animal.  While playful, there is also a sad quality to her work.  Malinow’s work reveals the nourishment and effort to needed to survive as well as the violence at times inherent in that. A squirrel has ingested some acorn’s while a wolf seems to be filled with the ghost of a red riding hood.

The Gouache Colored Collages Of Fabienne Rivory

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Artist Fabienne Rivory combines photography, collage, and painting in her work.  She often blends two images of landscapes or scenes by bisecting and combining them as if they were reflections of one another.  A touch of gouache paint is then digitally added to the photos and completes each of her pieces.  The effect on the landscapes is a bit disorienting but familiar.  Her work doesn’t seem to document places or times as much as it documents a feeling.  The bold color of the gouache contrasts against the black and white landscapes, each pulling something out of the scene, each evoking something different. [via]

Giant Underwear And Towers Of Trash From Wang Zhiyuan

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The work of Chinese artist Wang Zhiyuan turns our attention to the overlooked and discarded.  Whether he is using garbage to make art or making art look like garbage Zhiyuan’s art attempts to draw out a double take, a second slower look.  Zhiyuan has also created giant pairs of underwear – some of huge swaths of fabric others carefully carved.  Some seem like large and ancient bronze panties adorned with a relief addressing the AIDS pandemic.  He’s also made use of refuse to create a dizzyingly high tower stretching to be nearly four stories tall.  He says of the project:

“I thought it would be difficult to make these dead objects interesting or beautiful.  But I discovered that if you bring order to them, you can create beauty.”[via]