Levalet’s Wheat Paste Street Art Interacting with the City

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Street artist Levalet more than only uses the public space as a canvas.  The artist’s wheat paste images interacts with the city itself.  His life size subjects lean, sit, and lie down on the surfaces they are pasted on.  He even incorporates everyday objects such as books and umbrellas to further bring his work to life.  You can find his work on walls, on the street and in galleries, scattered throughout Paris, France.  [via]

Bringing The Outside In With Abelardo Morell’s Camera Obscura

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Photographer Abelardo Morell brings that outdoors in in his series Camera Obscura. Morell installs a lens or prism in a window and transforms an entire room into a camera obscura. The view outside is then projected on the opposing wall – upside down through the lens and right side up through the prism. A long-exposure photograph captures the outside world as its projected within the room. He says of the process and series:

“Over time, this project has taken me from my living room to all sorts of interiors around the world. One of the satisfactions I get from making this imagery comes from my seeing the weird and yet natural marriage of the inside and outside.

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New Hyperrealistic Sculptures from Ron Mueck

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As the Fondation Cartier points out, ‘a Ron Mueck exhibition is a rare event.”  His hyperrealistic sculptures are worked over carefully for countless hours.  Thus new work is especially exciting.  Mueck’s current exhibit at the Fondation Cartier introduces three new sculptures.  Couple Under an Umbrella, featured here, illustrates Mueck’s style well.  His amazingly lifelike sculptures are only betrayed as inanimate objects by their surreal size.  The giant couple beside their creator makes for a bewildering sense of scale and reality.  [via]

The Direct And Poetic Installations of Adel Abdessemed

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The work of artist Adel Abdessemed is at once direct and poetic.  He often uses common imagery and objects as a point of departure.  However, the mundane beginnings of these objects only further underscore the weighty nature of his art.  Abdessemed’s installations are able to provoke a sudden impact of its viewer.  Still, the installations communicate complex ideas that unfold over extended viewing.  At times controversial, his work is effective in piquing thought and discussion.

Jacob Everett’s Celebrity Doodled Portraits

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With your face close to Jacob Everett‘s ball point pen drawings, you’ll notice they look very similar to the endless swirling pen marks of a distracted mind.  The kind of meaningless doodles we may do while speaking on the phone.  If you zoom out, however, the doodles turn into detailed portraits of celebrities.  For his Well Known Faces series, Everett painstakingly arranges the tiny swirls to create huge portraits.  First, he sketches and graphs his subjects before layering them in swirls section by section.  He says of his work:

“I am interested in the contrast between the minute, repetitive mark-making and the highly personal image that is created. The process is similar to mass production. I work from photographs, concentrating on one section of the face at a time. Over several shifts spent in this way, the work culminates in a finished product which is, paradoxically, an authentic and personal portrait.”

Gifs of Creepy Clones by Erdal Inci

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In a way, endlessness is a fundamental characteristic of gifs.  However, the work of Turkish artist Erdal Inci, highlights this aspect of a medium in a style that is especially hypnotic and creepy.  Inci has worked in video for nearly ten years.  He’s since translated work into gifs using his same clone and light effects.  In them, he seems to produce an endless hoodied army of himself marching, sliding down handrails, hopping up and down stairs.  Though the action is brief, its repetitive nature makes it difficult to pull away your eyes.  All of the Erdal Inci clones in lockstep trudge on together until we manage to close the window.  [via]

Chandeliers Made from Bike Sprockets Hang Under an Overpass

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Ballroom Luminoso is a wonderfully different kind of ballroom.  A series of six chandeliers by artists Joe O’Connell and Blessing Hancock hang under an overpass in San Antonio, Texas.  The chandeliers are constructed from recycled bicycle parts, structural steel, and custom LED fixtures.  Shadow patterns of bicycle sprockets paint the surrounding area alongside colorful light.  Accompanying the bicycle parts are carefully carved imagery referencing the areas Hispanic, agricultural, and ecological heritage.  The artist statement goes on to say:

“The medallions are a play on the iconography of La Loteria, which has become a touchstone of Hispanic culture. Utilizing traditional tropes like La Escalera (the Ladder), La Rosa (the Rose), and La Sandía (the Watermelon), the piece alludes to the neighborhood’s farming roots and horticultural achievements.”    [via]

Ted Lawson’s Existential Human Body Sculptures

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The work of artist Ted Lawson reveals a persistent interest in the human body.  Though his work is attractive to look at, or at least hard to pull away from, there is clearly a deeper fear being expressed.  His art investigates processes related to the physical body such as growth, its needs, its decay and death.  Really, these sculptures are physical representations of modern psychological concerns.  The tenuous relationship between the body and the mind has been a highly scrutinized theme throughout much of contemporary art.  Lawson’s work, though, has a way of striking an especially carnal chord.