The Cotton Candy Installation of Erno-Erik Raitanen

Erno-Erik Raitanen installation1 Erno-Erik Raitanen installation7

Erno-Erik Raitanen‘s site specific installation, Cotton Candy Works, is built to crumble.  For the installation Raitanen builds a wall of cotton candy.  Visitors lick or pull off the cotton candy.  Within hours the entire installation returns back to its original nature – the fluffy sugar reverts back to its crystalline form.  The installation is definitely playful and looks like for gallery visitors.  Its more serious ideas of creation and destruction can’t be ignored.

The Gracefully Surreal Photography of Noell Oszvald

noell oszvald photography4 noell oszvald photography2

Young Hungarian photographer Noell Oszvald creates elegantly surreal images.  Her black and white photographs resemble mid-century fashion photography as much as it does the work of her surrealist influences.  Severe contrasts between light and dark create graceful lines and a definite composition for each piece.  In this way each image is intriguing, not only for its dreamy content but also because they are simply pleasing to look at.  Perhaps what is most surprising, though, is the fact Oszvald’s relationship with the camera is relatively new.  Only twenty-two years old Oszvald has only been using the medium for a little over a year. [via]

Advertise here !!!

Scott Young’s Punk Rock Veggies

scott young photography3 scott young photography1

The work of Scott Young is a playful turn on food photography.  His fruits and vegetables seem not so much delicious as rebellious.  Young photographs various produce covered with studs usually found on clothing.  He mixes the language of punk rock fashion with that of food photography to in a way that each undermines the other.  The simple idea is strangely amusing.  The disparate context of each crash together to create a new one that seems to somehow make sense in its own way.

Caverns Carved into Books by Guy Laramee

Guy Laramee sculpture9 Guy Laramee sculpture1

Guy Laramee delicately cuts caverns through the centers of books.  He carves the pages away to reveal caves that seem to be ready to be explored.  His work explores the insides of books in a very literal way.  Indeed, Laramee’s sculptures in way recall the plot of a classic: Journey to the Center of the Earth.  And, in fact, Laramee mentions this book in his statement on the series.  He says:

“Like in Jules Verne’s “Journey to the Center of the Earth”, we seem to be chained to this quest. We “have to” know what lies inside things. But in doing so, we bury ourselves in the “about-ness” of our productions – language, function, etc- all things “about” other things.”

The Surveyor Tape Installations of Megan Geckler

megan geckler installation1 megan geckler installation2

The slick site specific installations of Megan Geckler beam and bounce of walls like lasers.    Her installations’ ultra clean geometric forms and bright colors nearly hide the personal quality to the work.  The plastic rays are actually made of flagging tape – the kind you find just off the sidewalk typically used by surveyors.  Her installations intentionally bounce between art and design, industrial and hand made, cold and personal.  Also, just as her work shifts conceptually, it also shifts in shape from angle to angle.  Strands at one angle interact with strands at other angles as a viewer moves through the space. [via]

Scanner Glitch Photography from Federico Ferrari

federico ferrari photography9 federico ferrari photography2

The intentional glitchiness of the photography of Federico Ferrari is at once familiar and surprising.  This series appears to be still life photography interrupted by a scanner malfunction.  A section of each image is dragged across the plane reducing it to simple lines of color.  Small pieces of photographs are severely exaggerated in size.  It abstracts otherwise benign photographs and plays with the viewer’s perception of a simple scene scene.

Hubert Duprat’s Flies that Create Precious Works of Art

Hubert Duprat5Hubert Duprat1 Hubert Duprat2

It’s difficult to tell who is the artist in this work.  Hubert Duprat began working with caddisfly larvae in the 1980′s.  The caddisfly live in streams and use bits from their natural surroundings to create a casing to live in.  Typically this is made up of pebbles, wood, plants, and so on.  Duprat moved these caddisfly larvae to a new surrounding and delicately removed their outer shells   The caddisfly than used the precious metals and stones of their new home to create strangely glamorous shells.  It’s interesting to note the particular materials and patterns the larvae tend toward.  The flies’ “creativity” and Duprat’s conspicuously absent hand in work makes it extremely intriguing.

Portraits Created From Poetry

Jamie Poole collage1 Jamie Poole collage2Jamie Poole collage4

Artist Jamie Poole has taken a dramatic turn in his art recently.  Majoring in Design Poole has primarily worked in landscapes.  However, to create a portrait of Sophie, pictured above, he used a medium tied to her identity: English literature.  Poole uses strips of poetry to create a unique collage.  Words wrap around eyes and slide down noses to create incredibly realistic images.  The pieces are particularly large compared to the intricately placed lines.  Regarding this, Poole says:

“The repetition of collaging each line of text onto the board to make the image becomes similar to meditating in my view.  It also means I can really focus my attention on each individual area of the picture to really look closely at the subject and learn about her.”[via]