A Hotel And Art Gallery Built Entirely Of Snow And Ice

Icehotel architecture

Icehotel architecture

Icehotel architecture

Every winter about 125 miles North of the Arctic Circle a hotel is built entirely out of snow and ice.  While definitely a unique hotel, ICEHOTEL, as it’s called, is just as much an art project in its own right.  In a way the structure is contemporary interpretation of traditional homes built of the same material.  However, each year brings an entirely new design to the hotel.  In addition to being filled with guest rooms and a bar, the art and design group at ICEHOTEL also work from a handpicked group of artists.  The hotel becomes a temporary home to art and people, to be destroyed and rebuilt next year. [via]

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Images of the Hunter and Hunted from David Chancellor

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Photographer David Chancellor‘s series Hunter documents South African big game Hunting.  Chancellor explains that while hunting safari’s were once particularly fashionable among the leisure class, the activity has since undergone some changes.  Land that had once been dedicated to farming and livestock now serve as big game ranches – a place professional hunters can once again kill for sport.  Chancellor captures the complex relationship between hunter and hunted, which is rendered even more complex by modernization.  He says that the series is “a long term project documenting human/wildlife conflict in all it’s forms, Hunters explores the complex relationship that exists between man and animal, the hunter and the hunted, as both struggle to adapt to our changing environments.”

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The Cookware Sculptures of Adeela Suleman

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adeela suleman sculpture7

adeela suleman sculpture6

 

The art of Adeela Suleman is built of common cooking utensils found in her home of Karachi, Pakistan.  Suleman utilizes objects such as strainers, measuring spoons, tongs, and enamel pots among many others.  While many of her pieces appear organic, others seem to be a form of armor or helmet.  She juxtaposes traditionally domestic tools with the appearance of items of aggression and physical protection.  Perhaps, a reminder of physical abuse directed against women as well as the absurdity of violence.

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The Ghostly Portraits of Ana De Orbegoso

Ana de Orbegoso photography1 Ana de Orbegoso photography2Ana de Orbegoso photography5

Ana de Orbegoso‘s series of photographes, titled The Invisible Wall, is a way of visually depicting personal prejudices.  The photographs are a series of portraits each obscured by a pair of hands, as if the subject were hiding their face.  Underneath the hands, though, a face subtly appears.  Obviously, the series’ title refers to a figurative wall, a social one.  Of these ‘walls’ she says:

“Behind our individual walls we each keep hidden our prejudices, our preconceptions, our highest aspirations. Our individual walls serve to protect us by enabling us to always hold something back, an edge between what is hidden and what is revealed.”

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The Multi-Perspective Art of Christopher Derek Bruno

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The work of artist Christopher Derek Bruno playfully interacts with perspective shifts.  Some of his art only comes into a cohesive whole when viewed from a very specific angle.  Other pieces have multiple forms depending on where a viewer is standing.  In a way, his art uses literal multiple perspectives to comment on multiple social perspectives.  As his work changes from one vantage point to another, the reading of any work of art changes with each viewer.  In this way one piece becomes several.

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Designer Creates a Different Silhouette of His Daughter Every Week

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Graphic Design can often get the bad rap of lacking soul or substance.  Designer Brent Holloman, however, created a series with heart.  When his daughter was born in 2012 he decided to create a new silhouette of her each week.  Ranging from illustration to sculpture, each week brings a profile of his little girl.  These are a sampling of the many pieces he created.  Holloman comments on the series:

” With the arrival of our first baby girl there is one thing I hear all the time… “They grow up so fast.” So I decided to start a project where I can mark the stages of her growth by doing a silhouette of her each week for her first year (or as long as I can keep it going).”

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The Cut Paper City Sculptures of Matthew Picton

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Matthew Picton sculpture10Matthew Picton sculpture2

 

The work of Matthew Picton is something more than a map, even something more than a model city.  He meticulously builds cities from paper.  Each buildings wall is built from a strip of paper leaving its interior empty.  In a way his three dimensional maps get at the personality of a city.  Speaking about cartography Picton says,

“There is some intrinsic quality to cartography that goes beyond the scientific document – a beauty of form and detail, a record of past times and places, something that lives as a world in which imagination can flow; places to re-visit, places to re-imagine, a world to re-make itself in the imagination.”     [via]

Several of his pieces depict cities before and after a natural disaster or war.  The charred strips of paper mark burnt or crumbled buildings.  Pockets of burnt paper seem more like injuries than a cold record of a past fact.

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The Shrunken Cities of Ben Thomas’ Photography

Ben Thomas photography Ben Thomas photography

Ben Thomas photography

These are not photos of miniatures or models.  Rather these are images from photographer Ben ThomasCityshrinker series and are actual cities around the world.  Thomas uses what is called a ’tilt-shift technique’.  Among other things, the technique basically corrects the distortion caused by perspective.  This correction often has the appearance of miniaturizing the camera’s subject.  Thomas’ images present the world as if it were a toy.  Some of the world’s largest cities seem to shrink into playful places.  The images turn a lighthearted eye onto some of our favorite places. [via]

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