Mind Bending Anamorphic Street Art Installations

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The design studio/street art crew known as Truly Design is truly an expert at creating anamorphic art.  The group is playful with both literal and figurative perspective.  The Medusa anamorph, for example, does precisely this.  According to the myth if a person looked directly at the serpant haired Gorgon they would instantly turn to stone.  Perseus was only able to slay the monster by looking at her reflection.  Similarly, this Medusa can only be seen from singular perspective.

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Lawn Chairs As Fine Art

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It may be more accurate to title the post Fine Art as Lawn Chairs.  These sculptures from artist Patrick McDonough only resemble the outdoor furniture.  They may contain familiar hardware and components such as a hinge or stray armrest.  However, they are carefully constructed sculptures.  As much as they resemble outdoor furniture, McDonough also seems to be referencing abstract painting.  Chair frames mirror canvas frames, and the grid patterns that usually support our weight resemble Hard-edge Painting.  The one thing both lawn chairs and fine art seem to hint at is the idea of leisure and a leisure class.

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Designer Fashion Transformed Into Grotesque Consumerism Critique

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The artwork Andrea Hasler if nothing else is a critique of consumerism. Her Burdens of Excess series resemble the strange blend of designer fashion and a slaughterhouse.  Fleshy blobs bulge between straps and buttons nearly turning the high fashion accessories into bizarre creatures.  Zippers and stitching even begin to seem like biological features. Still, our “natural” biological sides as human is a jarring contrast to ideas as contrived as fashion, luxury, even money.

The press release from her recent show at Gusford Gallery in Los Angeles states:

“Hasler’s work focuses on constructions of identity and collective desires, and is characterized by a tension between attraction and repulsion. The works in the Desire series, in particular, focus on the obsession of projections of affluence and glamor. Reworking designer bags, shoes, and accessories into organ-resemblant sculptures, Hasler’s works engage with the psychological aspects of consumerism, blurring the lines between what you are and what you must have.

Through the transformation of GUSFORD’s Melrose Avenue gallery space into an indulgent, glamorous shop, Hasler’s installation embodies the epitome of luxurious excess, and looks to a dystopic future, where branded organs may one day be the ultimate fashion accessory.”

Watch a video of her installation at Gusford Gallery as well as a short interview with the artist after the jump.

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Taxidermy And Furniture Blend As Disturbing Comment On Consumer Culture

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Designer Armin Blasbichler‘s work is often jarring.  His series ORSON, I’m Home strikes a special chord, though.  The series is composed of three “dining sculptures” created primarily from the bodies of various farm animals.  While we may be more accustomed to farm animals adorning plates on the furniture, seeing them as taxidermy furniture makes for a surreal juxtaposition.  The furniture confronts its users with the consumption it usually facilitates.  Interestingly, for the series Blasbichler features a quote from professor and writer Don Slater: “In talking of modern society as a consumer culture, people are not referring simply to a particular pattern of needs and objects […] but to a culture of consumption.”

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Magnetic Liquid Makes For Very Creepy Video

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Compressed 02 from Kim Pimmel on Vimeo.

Compressed is a series of video work from artist Kim Pimmel.  The videos all utilize macro lenses, time lapse photography, and magnetism.  However, for Compressed 02 we find Pimmel’s mix as liquid.  The video is filled with a simple landscape of soap bubbles and punctuated with red dye.  A strange black liquid seems to navigate the network bubbles of its own accord, like black blood travelling through invisible capillaries.  This black liquid is an exotic ferrofluid – a magnetic liquid.  The ferrofluid travels the most efficient paths through the field of bubbles toward its invisible magnetic attraction.

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Artist Collaborates With Bees to Cover Sculptures With Honeycomb

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You could say artist Aganetha Dyck creates her sculptures as much as she fascilitates them.  Dyck uses honeybees to decorate these figurines.  The bees create graceful lines and countours that seem compliment the existing shapes of the figures.  Their honeycomb patterns don’t seem like strange additions but rather enhancements.  Dyck begins her process with figurines, often broken or damaged in some way.  Then collaborating with beekeepers and scientists, bees are allowed to add their distinctive pattern to each small statue.  Dyck describes her process:

“To begin a collaborative project with the honeybees, I choose a slightly broken object or damaged material from a second hand market place. I choose damaged objects because honeybees are meticulous beings, they continuously mend anything around them and they do pay attention to detail. To encourage the honeybees to communicate, I strategically add wax or honey, propolis or hand-made honeycomb patterns to the objects prior to placing them into their hives. At least I like to think my methods are strategic. The honeybees often think otherwise and respond to what is placed within their hive in ways that make my mind reel.”

[via]

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Graphic Designers Embark on Strange 40 Day Dating Project

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40 Days of Dating – All Videos from 40 Days of Dating on Vimeo.

It’s difficult to tell if it is performance art, a design project, or just a weird way to date.  However you classify it, graphic designers Jessica Walsh and Timothy Goodman have flung themselves into the project straightforwardly titled 40 Days of Dating.  Exasperated with the New York City dating scene, the designers turned to each other.  Each deals with the opposite problem – Jessica jumps in too quickly, Timothy’s reluctant to take the plunge.  The two good friends decided to date each other for forty days – the amount of time often thought required to quit a bad habit.  However, the dating project entails a bit more.  First, there are six rules:

  1. We will see each other every day for forty days.
  2. We will go on at least three dates a week.
  3. We will see a couples therapist once a week.
  4. We will go on one weekend trip together.
  5. We will fill out the daily questionnaire and document everything.
  6. We will not see, date, hookup, or have sex with anyone else.

The daily dating adventures of the couple were then uploaded to their in fashionable design style.  Would love and dating be redeemed or their relationship irreparably ruined?  40 Days of Dating was set to find out.

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Portraits Of Women As Everyday Objects Question Gender Roles

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The series Like Everyday of Iranian photographer Shadi Ghadirian is  powerful in its simplicity.  She created the images shortly after marrying her husband, and indeed the series explores her concerns associated with being a wife as well as gender roles.  In the series figures appear to be veiled in patterned cloth similar to the traditional Iranian Chador. The figure’s face, however, is obscured or replaced with a household item, often one associated with daily chores.  Ghadirian says of her subjects, “My series is exactly like a mirror of my life and other women like me — my sisters, my friends, the women who live in this country.”  Though the series specifically addresses Iranian women, the photographs capture more universal anxieties concerning gender roles – the anxiety that accompanies building an identity as a woman and a wife, navigating issues of power within a marriage.

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