Portland Nightlife Captured by Photographer Minh Tran

 

 

Photographer Minh Tran captures the raw, gritty nightlife of Portland in his series Nights, Camera, Action! The images simultaneously surprise with their intimacy and reflect what one might expect in a Portland night out complete with some PBR cradling. It’s a fun, seemingly endless scroll of people who just look like a real good time. When you make it over there, make sure to keep an eye out for a Stevie Wonder cameo. 

The Mirrored Photography of Traci Griffin

The shapes of Rorschach tests are intentionally flawed and ambiguous — allowing us to draw conclusions about a person’s psyche based on what organic matter they claim to see growing in the inkblots. In her series, Mirrors, photographer Traci Griffin flips that concept. By applying symmetry to natural subjects, they are rendered unnatural and too perfect for this world.

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A Surreal Wonderland Captured in the Photography of Katerina Plotnikova

The photographs of Katerina Plotnikova are apparitions of fairytales. Female subjects are cradled by ghosts and smoke while narratives come through pops of color. The resulting composition is a dreamlike fashion editorial hinting at both the wistful and sinister. (via)

Jeremy Rotsztain’s Pet Images Made With Found Flickr Photos

With found Flickr photos as his source, Jeremy Rotsztain‘s series Obsessions (Flickr Pets) “document the love and obsession that people have for their pets.” The individual images are color-blocked and reductive, verging on abstract in some instances, yet the subject matter keeps them recognizable and full of personality. Each still is the result of animations made in C++ using the openFrameworks library — which just sounds impressive for a series from 2008, right. Rotsztain’s catalogue has a wealth of series that explore the overlaps of technology, culture, behavior and art.

Larson & Shindelman’s Geolocation Series Captures the Locations Behind Tweets

For their series Geolocation, Nate Larson and Marni Shindelman mined for Tweets with publicly available GPS coordinates. They then traveled to and photographed those data-suggested locations and present their photographs with said Tweets as captions. The results are sometimes funny, sometimes poignant, and successful in exposing perhaps how little people think of what data they are putting out into the world and how easily it can be appropriated.

Tim Prince and his Forgotten Boneyard Recall Little Shop of Horrors

Forgotten Boneyard is the 100% real animal bone work of artist Tim Prince. In addition to the one-of-a-kind handcrafted creatures in bone, Prince offers a growing selection of wet specimens through Etsy. To me the real standout of the entire collection is Audrii muscipula (pictured above), an homage to Audrey II, the carnivorous plant from 1986′s Little Shop of Horrors made of mink vertebrae/scapula, box turtle shells, a skunk skull, coyote teeth, and raccoon mandibles. A mouse skull and other bones decorate the soil.  

Lutz Bacher And The Celestial Handbook

Lutz Bacher‘s recent exhibition at San Francisco’s Ratio 3 included the series The Celestial Handbook: offset book pages taken from found copies of amateur astronomer Robert Burnham Jr.‘s 1966 handbook of the same title. Each page — there are 85 in the series — is individually framed, forever capturing timeless subjects in a dated format. What we see are images of things that surpass the power of imagery with captions that can’t help but fall short in describing things that surpass the power of language. (via)

Chad Hagen’s Nonsensical Infographics

There’s been a lot of talk of 2012 being the “Year of the Infographic”: visual representations of data as aesthetically pleasing as they are informational. Chad Hagen welcomes us to “the world of fictional information” with illustrations that explore what we’ve come to accept as infographic staples — a visual key, multi-dimensional shapes, a vibrant color selection — with none of the facts. Without the burden of telling a story culled from factual data, various dimensions, planes and colors are free to tell whatever story they choose. (via)