Casey Ruble is in the details

 

Casey Ruble‘s cut-out paper collages are “more or less” true, according to the artist. Inspired by Truman Capote‘s “nonfiction novel” genre, Ruble bases her work on real imagery: photographs, books, magazines. She selectively omits, adds, and mixes facts and fiction, constructing scenes best read by their details.

Sarah Burwash’s Modern Mythology

 

Sarah Burwash‘s watercolors weave elements of the past and the present. Her compositions read like narratives, merging elements of community, tradition, and gender into modern mythologies. 

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Caleb Brown’s Cultural Allegories

Caleb Brown paints real things — sharks, diving tigers, track stars — in a realistic manner. Deviation lies in the implausible situations he inserts his subjects into. Brown uses what he calls “elements of contemporary life” to set the stage for a bigger, more interesting angle on current events.

Alexis Arnold’s Crystallized Literature

 

In applying borax crystal to books and magazines, Alexis Arnold turns functional reading material into sculpture. The naturally geometric planes of crystal adhere and warp pages, simultaneously marring and preserving classic and lowbrow titles alike. And hey, if nothing else, crystals are pretty cool. If you’re not afraid of inhaling some chemicals, turns out you can make your own at home.

Heeseop Yoon Debris Installations

Heeseop Yoon‘s large-scale installations explore storage and debris — items that occupy space in our lives. Yoon’s method varies between collage and pen, and plays on notions of memory and perception of clutter over time. The finished work doesn’t feel finished as it swells over the space it inhabits, sketched and redrawn, different from every angle and space. 

Brian Rea’s Modern Love

A collection of illustrations from Brian Rea‘s ongoing series for the New York Times‘s SundayStyles column about love and heartbreak. Nailed it.

Dina Litovsky’s Public Interactions

Dina Litovsky‘s work examines “group interactions in both public and private spaces.” In her series Bachelorette, Litovsky turns the lens on the long-standing tradition of the bachelorette party, observing females actively performing the rituals you may have heard about but never witnessed. 

Shannon Richardson

Shannon Richardson‘s photographs have a “presented without comment” feel to them, documenting the signage and structures of American countryside with the intent to preserve. In addition to the observational and timeless sights of Texas, Richardson’s book, Route 66 American Icon,  is a compilation of scenes from along the historic Route 66 highway.Richardson is an Amarillo, Texas-based photographer.