Annika Frye’s Experimental Design

Annika Frye is a young German designer making objects that are partly useful but mostly experiment. That modern cliché of “everything has been done”, or in this case, made, can be discouraging to some young artists and designers. But not everybody. Some people find in it a freedom– now that the difficult groundwork has been done, it is time to play. Annika is definitely in the latter group. Her designs are mostly about in what ways we can re-create the things we already have but in the wildest, most unconventional, and cheapest ways possible. Everything she does is at an angle– a table, made out of tape; a chair, that’s half blanket; a seat, that unfolds into a bed. Check out more of her designs and her descriptions thereof after the jump!

Video Watch: This Is It’s Don’t Hug Me I’m Scared

This Is It is a London film collective that make the great handmade-style films. Don’t Hug Me I’m Scared is one of their latest, and uses their arts and crafts aesthetic to make a hilarious mock-children’s PSA about creativity. It’s delightfully nihilistic, self-aware, and taps into something all of us have probably felt in any sort of Creative endeavor, namely that “creativity” isn’t just the purely positive act that popular culture makes it out to be. This is one you need to watch to the end, it’s 100% worth three of your minutes. Full video after the jump!

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Aleksey Kondratyev’s Fabricated Adventures

Aleksey Kondratyev‘s series Fabricated Adventures is all about adult escapism–making what we want from what we have. Whether you take it as a cynical critique of materialist make-believe, an homage to the capacities of human industry and imagination,  portraits of American vacation culture, or none of the above, they’re an interesting series. Here’s what he has to say about them:

“The photographs in this series are of locations which emulate a natural environment for the purpose of recreation. As humans live in their present environments, their experience is determined and limited by their time in history, climate, and physical location.The recreational spaces in this body of work provide a temporary escape from these limitations and from the reality of one’s present physical and geological surroundings.” – Aleksey Kondratyev

Bence Hajdu’s Images Of Altered Classical Paintings

Hungarian artist Bence Hajdu digitally edited out all the characters from old master paintings for his aptly titled series Abandoned Paintings. What started as a simple study of perspectival drawing turned into a series about the environments of renaissance painting which, outside the world of art historians, is largely ignored. Previously encouraged by the painters to focus on the Virgin Mary, Jesus and his disciples, Horatii warriors, and baby angels, we now shift our attention to tiled floors, towns outside the window, empty dinner tables, arches, boats, and gardens. Work this flawless is always stunning to stare at, and will hopefully inspire lots of photoshop-savvy art history enthusiasts to do this with all their favorite paintings. Bence’s statement:

“I am a student at the university of fine arts, hungary. At one of the descriptive geometry classes we had a task to find and draw the perspective and horizon lines of renaissance and other pictures with significant perspective space. I thought it is not that interesting to just draw lines, so I decided to erase all the characters from them and examine how the painter really created the perspective space and how it actually looks. I saw this could be something exciting and continued thinking and working on it. After a while I found myself interested in the new atmosphere and the new thoughts the retouched pieces generated without their main subjects.”

( via )

Albert Seveso’s Ink Clouds


We’ve all probably spent too much time watching creamer dissipate into coffee (or at least i did when i bussed tables). The interesting part to me wasn’t how beautiful and otherworldly the plumes looked, but how watching them never seemed to get old. Italian photographer Albert Seveso obviously shares this fascination and expands on it with varicolored inks which he captures with high-speed photography as they unfold underwater. Captured like this, the ink looks incredibly physical, like glass sculptures. Witnessing the transformation of substances feels like watching the cosmos themselves, which we are in a sense, and is why this is a series third graders and thirty year olds alike can get behind.

Christopher Michlig: The Image of the City

Christopher Michlig is a Los Angeles-based artist interested in constructed environments. His show at the Devening Projects + Editions in Chicago is up until December 8.  Check it out while you still can! This post is a mix of his current Chicago show and the show at Marine Contemporary that just ended. Great stuff!

“The term “urban fabric” often refers to everything that makes up the built environment, excluding environmental, economic, functional and sociocultural actualities. Using raw material culled from an archive of merchant posters Christopher Michlig collected from LA streets, Patternesque is a group of 16 collages, each a pattern study riffing on idiosyncratic typographic anatomy. While each collage is a distinct composition, common threads run throughout. Emphasizing the flexible, open-ended nature of the project, the work also suggests the morphology of urban space. Alongside the collages, Michlig presents a group of architecture-related relief sculptures. Based on a tradition of architectural model making in which massing models are used to dimensionally summarize the fundamental forms of buildings, Michlig’s “City Plan” relief sculptures interpret typographic space as proposed city plans. Reflective of the spaces from which the original posters were collected, while simultaneously nondescript, each city plan forces a consideration of the power dynamic of language itself as an imagined built environment.” – Christopher Michlig
photo credit: Josh White

 

Daniel Seung Lee & Dawn Kim’s Crayola Theory

Los Angeles photographer Daniel Seung Lee teamed up with New York art director Dawn Kim for a stellar little series entitled Crayola Theory. As you might have guessed, the series interprets the objects and environments in Crayola’s crayon names to make still life photographs that are a tons of fun. Not only does the project work in the direction of bringing objects to the names of colors, it inspires the converse as you wander around the city, applying names to the objects around you — voting envelope fuchsia, stereo silver, toilet paper white, suburb beige, tanning booth orange. Thank you Daniel & Dawn for reminding us that we live in a world made of colors. 

Jamie Warren’s Americana Photographs

We posted about Jamie a few years back, but four years have passed since then and she’s only gotten better. Her images about gross, awkward, uncomfortable, and funny moments that would be really easy to make poorly, and a lot of people do. What sets her apart from the herd, though, is her smart, tight framing; focusing us in on exactly what makes this country great–mystery meat, batman, butts, and birthday cake. She even photographs middle America (Jamie’s based out of Kansas City) with the American style that ranges from family to paparazzi photos–bright, garish flash. More Americana after the jump! ( via )