Kiva Ford’s Unbelievable Miniature Glass Jars And Bottles Fit Between Your Fingers

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Avid glass blower Kiva Ford spends most of his days making complex glass instruments for use in the science lab. After completing a college degree in Scientific Glassblowing, he creates some pretty wild creations. But not only does he do it as a professional job, Ford twists molten glass in his spare time too. As a hobby, he makes other kinds of complicated glass forms – these ones are geared more toward art and commerce. He crafts delicate, miniature versions of bottles, goblets, pendants, domes, vessels, Champagne flutes and vases, all made from glass. Any even though they are tiny in size, they don’t lack imagination or incredible details.

As a member of the American Scientific Glass Blowers Society, he creates custom made glassware for research and discovery. He makes things that can’t be made by a machine or mass produced – all of his creations are as artistic as the next. For Ford, there is no real difference between the two.

I get just as excited about scientific glass as I do artistic glass. The whole process is beautiful to me. (Source)

Enjoying a tradition started a few thousand years ago in Persia, Ford enjoys using the same techniques that haven’t changed – blowing glass over an open flame. He says he loves coming up with new ideas – trying to see what is possible, and what isn’t possible. He even manages to create tiny animals from glass and fits them into other glass containers – achieving something he says, he hasn’t seen anyone else be able to.

For Ford his main aim is to focus on one skill – and get good at what he does. And it is pretty obvious he is well on his way to being a full fledged master of glass. (Via Trenf)

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Magic Eye: Ari Fararooy’s Surreal Self Portraits Made With Mirrors Will Play Tricks On Your Eyes

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Just like you shouldn’t trust everything you read on the internet, you shouldn’t believe everything you see. L.A based special effects artist Ari Fararooy‘s latest photographic series is a perfect example of this. Using a tripod, mirrors, a self timer and ‘a few digital manipulations’ he has created a very surreal, and futuristic set of self portraits. He went to Joshua Tree National Park wanting to carry on his creative twists on the latest ‘selfies’ craze.

The goal was to experiment with reflections and explore the various ways I could creatively photograph myself. (Source)

He also had this aim in mind while attending the Burning Man festival in 2014. After he found himself in the strange environment that is the desert, surrounded by many creative people, he began clicking his shutter and coming up with some very inventive camera tricks, involving glow sticks, long exposures, strange perspectives and wide angles. You can see that series here.

His photographs are just as surreal as a Dali painting, but he uses modern technologies and a different set of skills. Be sure to see the extent of his talents to transform the ordinary into the extraordinary on his Facebook and Instagram pages. (Via Fubiz)

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Urban Artist Deck Two Sketches A Massive 29 Foot Long Version Of His Perfect City

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The massive large scale ink drawings of French graffiti artist Deck Two are a narrative that you can really get immersed in. At over 29 feet long, his sketches are a part of a series called Expanding Drawing. And they are exactly that – drawings that stretch out and don’t end at the usual borders. For this particular project he was based in Tokyo and has tried to capture the all-encompassing feeling of the city. Every inch is filled with intricate details about city life, and we can really see just how much of a living, breathing organism major metropolises are.

His drawings are like precise, architectural illustrations made of a future city. Motorways curve around beautifully, and merge together, running into the center of the urban sprawl. Deck Two profiles mega cities with a gracefulness reminiscent of the Francis Ford Coppola film Koyaanisqatsi. He talks about his idea of a utopian place:

My idea of a perfect town is a place where young and old people can live together; poor and rich, who always have access to culture and art. (Source)

The French artist is interested in many different forms of art, involving different aspects of the urban landscape. From motion design to illustration, VFX to storyboard, drawing to graffiti – Deck Two likes to switch from computer to wall painting, and vice versa. He has painted walls, cars, and numerous murals. Be sure to check out his other work and a few videos showing the artist at work, here and here.

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The Future Of Painting: An Amazing New Method To Paint 3D Printed Surfaces

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A brand new method for painting 3D objects may just revolutionize the way our cups, shoes, masks, vases, or car parts are decorated. Basically any type of object – and not necessarily a 3D printed one, can undergo this process, and come out with a multicolored pattern transferred onto it’s surface. Researchers from Hangzhou’s Zheijiang University and NYC’s Columbia University ave come up with this idea, one that they call computational hydrographic printing.

Hydrographic printing isn’t entirely a new thing – in the past, patterns were applied onto a thin film of plastic sitting on a body of water. The object was then dipped into the water, through the adhesive-soaked film. The trouble with that method is that the pattern was stretched around the sides of the item, warping and ruining the design. It could never yield consistent results. But this is the difference now:

….what they do is 3-D scan whatever object they want to print on before they dunk it. Algorithms then take whatever pattern you want to paint on it, and print it on the layer of transparent film in such a way that, when lowered into the water bath by a robotic arm, the pattern will be applied perfectly, every time. (Source)

With this method, you can repeatedly dunk the item, and decorate multiple sides, without the pattern getting screwed up. Be sure to watch the video to watch the whole incredible process. (Via Fast Code Design)

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Alexey Kondakov Photoshops Classical Paintings Into Contemporary Urban Settings

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Have you ever wondered what a modern day Bacchus would look like? Or where Hercules and Hera would make out if they lived in a city? Well now you get to visualize it thanks to the imagination and talent of Ukrainian art director Alexey Kondakov. In his series The Daily Life Of Gods, he has photoshopped different classical gods, nymphs, angels and cherubs into various settings and locations we are all familiar with in our age.

We see Romans who sit in the middle of subway stations wearing laurel wreaths and playing the harp, like it is just another ordinary day. A forlorn damsel sits in diner pining over a lost lover, drinking a hot cup of coffee. A scantily clad couple make out on a sidewalk, in the dim street lamp light, surrounded by nosy cherubs. The different scenarios Kondakov has created are oddly surreal. Although they are far fetched, the scenes are not too unfamiliar. The figures, who would appear graceful and ethereal in Renaissance paintings, are, in their new settings, distasteful or tacky. The groups of these mythical figures are almost like drunken party tourists in any modern metropolis; looking like they are causing trouble and up to no good after a Friday night pub crawl.

Kondakov talks about his project a bit more:

….Then I thought, ‘What if I invite these [gods] into our reality and imagine they are on streets of modern Kiev?’ Then I wanted to transform a noisy company of cheerful kids who gathered to spend time together in the city or go to the movies. And in these heroes I saw the work of other artists. ….My project is about life. I really want to avoid talking about the social commentary. (Source)

But however they may seem, Kondakov’s fictional scenarios are definitely amusing, entertaining, and perhaps let us see the street dwellers of our own cities in a different light. (Via We The Urban)

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Kai Sekimachi’s Delicate Bowls Made Of Leaf Skeletons Can Take A Pounding

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Kai Sekimachi - leaf bowls

Although she is more known for her weaving and looming, artist Kai Sekimachi has shown she can branch out into other areas of expression with her impressive bowls made from leaves. Defying the very nature of the materials she works with, Sekimachi has come up with a way to make a flimsy leaf into a structure that can support heavier objects. By adding Kozo paper, watercolor and Krylon coating to the leaves, she is able to turn a skeletal transparent leaf into something that isn’t those things at all.

Having written numerous books on arts and crafts with her husband, Bob Stocksdale, she is an expert on many areas of handmade items and objects. The pair’s practices are both anchored in nature, and show their extensive knowledge as pioneers of American Craft.

Sekimachi creates distinctive pieces from natural materials such as linen, decaying leaves, shells, and grass, and pairs them with nature inspired motifs. (Source)

Sekimachi is not afraid to try her hand at new things, and proves repeatedly that she is a fast learner. After seeing a group of students weaving at the California College of Arts and Crafts in 1949, where she was also enrolled, the very next day, the curious artist spent all of her savings on a loom of her own. She then went and perfected her craft over the next few years.

The influential couple will be having an exhibition at the Bellevue Arts Museum titled In The Realm Of Nature from July 3 to October 18 in Washington. (Via Bored Panda)

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Strange Beauty: Jen Mann Celebrates Faults And Flaws In Her Latest Hypnotizing Paintings

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Jen Mann‘s oil paintings are sublime, dreamy, quiet and hypnotizing. They are awkward, special moments of men and women turned into striking portraits. Her luscious brushstrokes and amplified colors are able to turn a mundane moment into something ethereal and magical. Mann also celebrates the flaws and imperfections of her models. Instead of smoothing them over, she embraces them, even exaggerating them – whether it is the freckle under an eye, or the wrinkles in someone’s lips. And that is the thing that elevates the moment into something timeless. Mann says about her paintings and the moment frozen within them:

[They represent] something that is kind of ….lost. [Something] we don’t really look at in our society – we only look at perfect moments, like a manicured facade. (Source)

She explores the idea of identity, how we present ourselves, and who we are. Her paintings represent a ‘lost reality’ rather than the actual reality. They are more about the moment we share together in the world outside of ourselves, and less about the actual person. In a way she is trying to capture the existential image of her subjects – perhaps they are more like a spiritual portrait. She continues:

I’m trying to imagine how I would see an image or a moment as a child. And how hyper saturated and amazingly fun everything was when I was little. The days were longer, the summer was better. Everything was just fantastic… as we grow older, we are less naive. (Source)

Her portraits do feel like recalling a happy memory – like watching an old friend or sibling playing in slow motion in the orange light of a sunset. They are sensational images – emotionally charged, hyper-real and almost surreal. Make sure you continue to get lost in the dreamworld of Jen Mann in the images after the jump.

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Tattoo Artists Ink Over Mastectomy Scars With Empowering And Personal Designs

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Tattoos have been personal and symbolic to a lot of people for a long time, and these tattoos mean a whole lot to these women for a very heart warming reason. P.ink is a collection of artists who team up with breast cancer survivors and ink designs over their mastectomy scars. The aim of the group is to help women who have won the battle with cancer feel happy to look in the mirror again; so that they want to look at their breasts once more, and not only to be reminded of the pain and suffering they have experienced.

For most of these women who choose to get tattooed, the inking process represents gaining control back over what has happened to their bodies. Not only do the images cover the physical scars, but they also lessen the emotional and psychological scars the cancer has created.

Launched in 2013, along with Molly’s story, P.ink has bought together 47 artists and 48 survivors, in over 12 locations around the United States in the few years it has been operational. With over 2.6 million breast cancer survivors in the U.S alone, it was clear a lot of women needed a way to celebrate their battle with the disease. Over 56% of those survivors are left with visible scarring and often no nipples, and adding tattoos to the area after surgery is a beautiful way to turn something that was avoided into something worth celebrating and showing off.

You can donate to P.ink now, or learn more about becoming a survivor participant. (Via Bored Panda)

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