Marilyn Minter

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Born in 1948, New York based artist Marilyn Minter has been creating these sensual, borderline pornographic images since the 80s. Her process involves taking photographs of her subjects and then (usually) painting them on a huge scale using enamel paint on metal. Yet, as Emily Davidow says, “…the paintings feel more real than the gorgeous photographs that inspire them. Illuminating the moments when things fall apart, the paintings get more interesting as your gaze lingers on after that first arresting glance and you discover the imperfections. Hand feathered layers of enamel on metal render sweat, stubble, wrinkles and freckles lush, tactile and luminous.” The paintings are huge. I can only imagine what they look like in person.

Richard Galpin

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British artist Richard Galpin has developed a very specific method which he uses to create all of his work, going all the way back to 2001. He shoots photographs in cities and then takes a scalpel to them, stripping away pieces of the image until a new kind of image of urban space – a very futuristic urban space – emerges. So while he is imagining the future, we can still see the vestiges of the past.

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Gary Brewer

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Artist Gary Brewer combines the visual language of old school science illustrations (like the kind you’d find in a textbook from the 70s) with some extra imagination to create these otherworldly floating collections of plants, rocks, and other organic matter.

I Want To Be a Baby

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Weirdest ad campaign ever is about all I can say about I Want to Be a Baby. Created for Egg, a baby clothing brand by art director Martai Barrondo, the site…is just weird. Words cannot do it justice, just go look.

Alison Blickle

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New York artist Alison Blickle creates interests paintings in which female nudes (which I think are roughly self-portraits) are pictured in the majestic beauty of nature. While this might not sound all that revolutionary on its own, there is an interesting, almost cartoonish aesthetic in the paintings which creates a sort of off-putting sense of abstraction/simplification, as if this reality is very far from the artist’s life.

Wyld File

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Wyld File is a group of Flash animators creating work that’s pretty much in the same vein as Paper Rad‘s stuff. In fact they may very well be the same people, judging from the amount of times Paper Rad is referenced on Wyld File’s website. I think my favorite part of their gimmick is their parody (I think?) of Dogme 95, purporting that their brand of Flash animation is revolutionary and pushes Flash to its limits.

As Paper Rad puts it ,”A lot of cool shit was done in Flash, but there was never anything really that looked so funky that pushed Flash behond it limits, into an arena where the very tools of Flash have eaten themselves and caused a creative process to evolve against all the things Flash isn’t supposed to do.”

Paper Rap insists the loosely based value system “Dogman 99″ consisting of the rules “no Wacom tablet, no scanning, pure RGB colors only, only fake tweening, as many alpha tricks as possible”…

Cassandra C. Jones

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Carnegie Mellon grad Cassandra C. Jones makes work that embraces the digital photography + social web revolution to the fullest extent. She combs the web for pictures that fit whatever project she may be working on (above, wallpaper made entirely from images of flamingos), many of which end up being amateur digital snapshots uploaded to Flickr or other photo hosts. Taking this found photography, she creates art – sometimes smart, sometimes clever, sometimes thought-provoking compositions.

Cassandra C. Jones was recently featured on BoingBoing Video. The interview, which I highly recommend watching, is after the jump, along with some more images of her work.

0s & 1s

0s & 1s is the directing debut of LA-based filmmaker Eugene Kotlyarenko. The film, currently set for release in fall of 2009, is about a guy named James Pongo who loses his computer and finds that his “hyper-connected reality takes a nosedive.” 0s and 1s utilizes a unique visual system in which the viewer watches the movie through a barrage various computer-like windows, bringing a decontextualized computer environment to the silver screen and eschewing traditional expectations of cinema language.