Diane Han Illustrates Friendly Fish Taco, Unicorn Flies And Other Funny Creatures

Diane Han

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Diane Han is an illustrator and graphic designer originally from Korea, but now living and working in Los Angeles. While diverse, a common thread through Diane’s work is a play on words. Working largely with acrylic on paper, Diane plays with different means of representing animals in order to tell a story that is often critically and socially driven, while still managing to be so approachable and pleasant. I personally love the skunk piece after the jump, talk about a problem-solver.

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Sun Yeo’s Dreamy Gestures

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Sun Yeo is a graphic-designer-gone-artist based in Los Angeles. Remnants of Sun’s graphic design career are visible in the work, which introduces a hybrid digital/analog technique to create each piece. Through the subtle, dreamy, and whimsical gestures in her artwork, Sun suggests the simultaneous presence of comfort and innocence in a world that is stuck somewhere between fantasy and reality. Check out a handful of Sun’s latest body of work after the jump, and be sure to see the full collection on her website.

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Windows of New York – An Illustrated Series

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I’m loving this project by Jose Guizar called “Windows of New York.” Every week, Jose walks the streets of his city streets in New York and documents the neighborhood windows. After picking out windows of interest, he takes them into illustrator and makes magic happen. In his own words: “I’m into all kinds of visual things, sharing good stuff with great people, and apparently, staring creepily at windows.” Check out a selection of Jose’s windows after the jump, and follow along at windowsofnewyork.com

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Annie Marie Musselman’s Animal Portraits

Annie Marie Musselman’s photographic work has a very unique quality and strategic approach to capturing the soul of an animal. When browsing through the collections on her site, I couldn’t help but feel like I was looking at another human being, not a bird or a fox… Currently, Musselman is working on a project photographing animals in sanctuaries around the world in order to raise awareness around the fragility and beauty of endangered species – animals which if saved, would save countless other species as well.

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Canon Call’s Disruptive Doodles

I just got back from checking out the undergrad show at UCLA Design Media Arts, and I was impressed with a lot of the work, but there was one young artist that really stood out to me: Canon Call. Call’s work is largely comprised of illustration on found materials, and the sincerely charming thing about these little disruptive doodles is their ability to build upon the image they are layered on top of in order to develop a dialogue around pop-culture and society at large. The best part of the work is the hidden irony behind the naming of each piece’s source file… each JPEG on his site is titled “dontsteal.jpg” or “dontcopythis.jpg – and various other alterations of that phrase. Genius. The work itself feels like a weird mashup of pop art and a surrealist exquisite corpse of sorts. I am very much looking forward to watching Call’s work develop.

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Noa Kaplan’s Giant Dust Bunny

Noa P. Kaplan is a visual artist living in Los Angeles, California. Last year I had the pleasure of walking through Kaplan’s giant dust bunny, installed at UCLA. It was a weird feeling, feeling both small and large at the same time… Her larger body of artwork examines the impact of technology on production processes, material structure, and scale. This piece in particular, however, is specifically interested in providing a new scale to something small, a dust bunny, in order to design new associations and emotional connections with the clump of dust that we would otherwise sweep under the rug in disgust. The artist explains the context of this piece so beautifully: “Though mundane, a dust bunny bears unexpected symmetry to the most complex and baffling systems, such as the accretion of cosmic matter or the organization of memories in the brain.”

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Ilona Gaynor Is Designing A Bank Robbery

 

Ilona Gaynor is a designer and image maker hailing from the UK. Her latest project, Under Black Carpets, leverages bank heists as a medium of design. Through a series of intensive design and research exercises, Gaynor is using the strategies and vocabularies of robbery as a method for storytelling. Perhaps the most bizarre fact about the project is that is actually a collaborative effort with the NYC FBI Department of Justice and the LAPD archival department. Geoff Manaugh puts it well, stating that the project is an investigation into the “use and misuse of the cityscape where by architecture is considered both the obstacle and the tool to bridge or separate you from what you’re looking for” in both legal and illegal agendas. The project, ongoing, is currently comprised of an obsessive collection of materials that range from photographs of bank entrances to scale-models of get away cars. The project truly feels like the work of an insane person… and I mean that in the best way possible.

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Orestes Grediaga’s Paintings And Drawings Of Black Holes

Black Hole is a project by Stockholm-based artist, Orestes Grediaga. A feeling of “void” and “emptiness” had struck the artist almost instantly – a feeling he had yet to experience. That day, the artist was drawn to a large piece of paper, on which he drew a black hole. “When it was dry, it seemed to absorb all of me as I looked at it. Inside, there were no thoughts nor feelings, no memories, no physicality, nothing. It was like a black hole. At that moment a sense of abiding calm came over me from inside, from the very same place this enigmatic void was coming from.” - Orestes Grediaga

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