Olaf Breuning’s Bizarre Coffins

Olaf Breuning commissioned a series of coffins to be created by Ghanaian casket makers. The design of eccentric coffins actually has a long history and tradition in Ghana, so to some this work is actually not that peculiar. Still, it’s not every day you see a coffin in the shape of a melting popsicle. More images of the coffins and the process of making them after the jump.

HelloMe’s Critical Objects Blur The Line Between Art And Furniture

Critical Objects is a personal initiative of Berlin-based graphic design firm, HelloMe. The project began as a series of explorations that thrive on not having any particular goal. The project consists of a series of objects that transcend a blurry line between artistic sculpture and functional furniture. The beauty of the project is that it remains unknown to the user if these things should really every be used, touched, sat on, or turned on… We have a small collection featured here, so be sure to check out the full series at Critical Objects.

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Zoe-Zoe Sheen’s Whimsical Repetitions

Zoe-Zoe Sheen is an illustrator and designer living in Los Angeles. Currently, By day, she is  a designer at GOOD, but by night, she is up into the wee hours making artwork full of play and whimsy. A part of her bio pretty much nails the personality of Sheen’s work: “I love penguins, making things by hand; food, painting, sculpture, eating cheesecake and exploring.” While diverse, Sheen’s body of work is connected by pattern. Even the piece that are not traditional textiles, upon close investigation, consist of such dense repetition. On December 2nd, Zoe-Zoe will have some work up alongside a great group of artists in Los Angeles at RAW. We’ve only featured a small selection of her work here, so be sure to check out her portfolio site, and visit her shop to get a print of your own.

Ricardo Bojorquez’s Feedback Occurrences

Ricardo Bojorquez is an artist and graphic designer in Los Angeles. His latest artwork, Feedback Occurrences, uses standard materials, common techniques and everyday electronics to create an inventory of interactions. As a graphic designer, Ricardo’s practice is messy and defiant of the typical grid-like structures and legibility we are all taught to praise in design school, while still feeling so deliberate and well communicated. Ricardo received his MFA in Media Design from the Grad Media Design program at the Art Center College of Design in 2012. In 2011, Ricardo was invited to the Werkplaats Typografie / ISIA workshop in Urbino, Italy, where he studied under the mentorship of Armand Mevis, Maureen Mooren, Leonardo Sonnoli and Karel Martens. Ricardo is a partner at The Rare Studio, a studio for design and research that works within graphic design, interaction, and architecture. All of this work payed off as just last week he was honored with the prestigious recognition of being named a “Young Gun” by the Art Directors Club.

Guillermo Bert’s QR Code Textiles at the PMCA

Over the weekend I had the pleasure of dropping by my neighborhood museum, the Pasadena Museum of California Art (PMCA), to check out new work by Guillermo Bert. The digital age has managed to find its way into places the mechanical age was never quite able to get to. In the exhibition’s accompanying essay, Peter Frank claims that this phenomenon has resulted in the poor becoming “confident operators” of this advanced technology. Of course accessibility is a good thing, but one can also argue that the arrival of this kind of technology can also put indigenous culture and tradition at risk. By combining QR Code technology with the very traditional art of textile weaving, Bert is bringing this infiltration of culture to the surface. The codes, when scanned with your mobile device, play one of a series of documentary films that contain several engaging protagonists who help unfold the story of the Mapuche people. Throughout history, textiles have been used by indigenous cultures to pass on the story of a culture from generation to generation. Perhaps Bert’s “encoded textiles” are a strange evolution of that tradition.

Tanner Teale’s Performative Documentations

Tanner Teale’s work uses every day materials to investigate the difference between performance and documentation. With each of his studies, Teale obsessively creates a kind-of “living” still-life that is full of tension and mystery. His most recent piece titled “Hair Dryer Knife Balloon” (pictured above) makes it clear that each of Teale’s portraits are comprised of a series of components that are completely reliant upon each other (like a formula or a recipe) in order to make the portrait as a whole work. Think of it this way: if that fan gets unplugged, the balloon will definitely pop.

Water Transformed Into Wigs For The Bald

To all our bald readers: we may have a new solution for you. Water Wigs is a new photography experiment by action photographer, Tim Tadder. The series consists of high-speed still frame images from a photo shoot that combines bald men with buckets of water. The images are snapped right at the moment the water hits the head to create a hair-like form. Take a look at some of our favorites from this extensive series after the jump.

Emily Hoxworth’s Narrative Worlds

Let’s hop into the mind of Washington DC based artist, Emily Hoxworth. At the core of each of Emily’s pieces, as she states on her portfolio site, is an interest in biology, but specifically the idea that the core of our biological purpose is to reproduce our genetic material. This greater purpose, Emily explains, is a starting point for her explorations which largely take the form of alternative, narrative, worlds. The imagery is a bizarre mashup of mythology, nature, and medical illustrations. The result – a kind of psychedelic series of landscapes and scenes that are very much alien, yet somehow familiar – I like to speculate that these images are akin to the scenery we might experience upon birth. A kind of visual experience that is forgotten upon arrival. Check out more of Emily’s work after the jump.