Ashkahn Shahparnia

I recently found Los Angeles based designer/illustrator Ashkahn’s portfolio. I fell in love with quite a few of these bizarre and quirkly little ideas–they’re deceptively simple, goofy and fun. Somehow “Good Vibes” made out of green shag grass just sums it up.

Jim Gaylord opens tonight @ Gregory Lind

Jim Gaylord will be exhibiting new work at Gregory Lind gallery, opening Sat. Feb 5th and running til March 14th. Building on his past work as a filmmaker, Gaylord’s work cultivates and abstracts imagery from special effects and action sequences in the movies. With titles like “Study (Braveheart + Jackass: the Movie + Cloverfield + Last of the Mohicans + Home Alone 2), 2009,” Gaylord reveals the humor behind popular culture through the lens of movies.

Advertise here !!!

Taylor Davis

I love Taylor Davis’ weird little boxes and bizarre constructions. A lot of them remind me of the magic trick paraphernalia I used to play with endlessly as a little girl- like they have secret compartments or something.

Megan Whitmarsh

What can I say, I can not get enough of Megan Whitmarsh’s pastel-colored embroidered day dream doodles and soft-sculptures of fabric cigarettes and pizza slices. It’s like Klaus Oldenberg ate an entire 20 lb. bag of Valentine’s day Sweethearts and grew up in the 70′s….or that adorable (but geeky) little girl was allowed to ditch the kittens and actually embroider what she wanted- flying V guitars and monsters in space boots. The best!

Bryce Duffy’

I’m not very knowledgeable in the field of commercial photography, but there’s something subtly funny about many of Bryce Duffy’s photographs. In fact, it seems a bit stupid to even call it “commercial” photography vs. just plain old photography. I guess the difference is that you can hire Duffy to create his artwork for you to particular ends. However, in most of his work there’s a sort of looming 70′s kitsch hilarity lurking just under the surface. Burt Reynolds photographed under a giant painting of himself? Genius!

Interview: Jason Redwood

Acrylic, cell vinyl, and spray paint on panel 20 5/8”x12”

Acrylic, cell vinyl, and spray paint on panel 20 5/8”x12”

Jason Redwood creates transmogrophic kalleidoscopic explosions of pop culture saturated lucid dreams. With a background in illustration and design, many of his images embody a vibrant, hard-edge pop aesthetic that could almost be digitally generated. In fact- Redwood sites the visual vernacular of advertising, web, television, billboards–the current day image glut–as being woven into his insane tapestries. Childhood memories, strange visions, and humor also play off each other in hypersectra, hypersaturated colors, into a “beautifully perverse mega-meal,” as Redwood describes them. His works are visual feasts of fancy, intensely seductive eye-candy that, if they were allowed to flash and vibrate on a moving screen, would probably induce seizures–but in a transcendant, ecstatic way.

 

New Beautiful/Decay wallets!

"Satellite" by Sentimental Soycheese


"Throw Up" by Skwak

Beautiful/Decay recently teamed up with Poketo to create custom wallets! The first is the  interstellar design “Satellite” by anonymous art collective Sentimental Soycheese, featuring a B/D spaceship in a gradient lit space-scape. Second is “Throw Up” by Skwak, whose main character is a multi-eyed blue behemoth barfing a macrocosmic selection of minute monsters. 

 

The wallet contains 3 slots for credit cards, a bill slot, and a change purse. It’s 8.5″ x 3.75″ open, but folds perfectly to fit in your pocket (4.25″ x 3.75″). All wallets are limited edition and all online orders come with a matching badge/pin too!

 

Sold on our online shop!

Sarah Emerson

“In my paintings I use the violence and romantic sadness of the natural landscape to provoke a sense of fragility and melancholic instability beneath the surface of the image. I like to use a variety of images that are beautiful and sad with natural elements that can also be seen to parallel the worst parts of our human animalistic behaviors.” -Sarah Emerson

 

There is a sense in Sarah’s work of sadness and impending doom that i really enjoy.