Abu-Bakarr Mansaray’s futuristic Blueprints

Abu-Bakarr Mansaray creates futuristic images using an aesthetic similar to blueprints. Engineering plays a large role in these works that lay out a design for space-like machines and hybrid alien-robot figures. His works are intricately constructed with scientific precision and laboring detail combining image and text. While these futuristic prototypes draft the structure of machines and figures, they also reveal an inner narrative of conflict, war, and turmoil. Blueprints are highly neat and organized, yet Mansaray chose to subvert this aesthetic and portray his vision as chaotic, powerful, and in motion as though they have a life of their own.

eBoy Interview

Digital Design Collective eBoy Discusses their Limited Edition BD Apparel Shirt “Jerk”

The digital design collective eBoy, comprised of Steffen Sauerteig, Svend Smital and Kai Vermehr recently sat down with Beautiful/Decay to answer a few questions about their recent limited edition shirt, “Jerk.” eBoy’s design was one of our most technical cut and sews ever, taking months to produce! Only 250 of these exclusive shirts were produced and are selling out fast- visit our Online Shop to purchase one!

Read on to garner some of eBoy’s pixellated points of interest and inspiration behind their work and Beautiful/Decay Apparel design.

BD: Can you talk a little bit about your design collective and how it got started?

eBoy: We started in 1998 with eboy.com. The concept was to only show our free projects and art. The first feature about eBoy was in a Japanese book, from there the level of awareness for eBoy grew steadily.

eBoy design

eBoy design

BD: Can you describe your aesthetic, how you became interested in the pixel-by-pixel look, and what you think it says about the current visual digital climate today?

eBoy: One of our previous projects was a digital picture book series called Ogdig(c)’s, which was distributed on diskettes. It was that project that made us start to work for the screen only and use pixels as the technique of choice. When we went online with eBoy.com it was justnatural to go on using this technique.

eBoy work for Coke

eBoy work for Coke

BD: What are some of your inspirations, whether visual, musical, ideological…?

eBoy: ffffound.com … TV Shows like The Wire, Sopranos …

BD: What was the inspiration behind creating the Eboy shirt?

eBoy: Northern Irish murals!

Example of Northern Irish propaganda Mural

BD: What was the process like of creating your artwork in a t-shirt form, what were the most enjoyable parts, or most challenging?

eBoy: We were thinking of the T-shirt as a house with awkward window positions.

To learn more about eBoy, visit their B/D Artist Profile or the eBoy website.

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Lesbian Beds

Photographs of beds belonging to lesbians by Tammy Rae Carland.

Børre Sæthre

“…By focusing on desire retold as science-fiction tableaux, theoretical constructs or fragments of myths, Sæthre taps into our need to translate raw lust into a symbolic language that conforms to socially acceptable mores.”

(via Frieze Magazine)

Josh Spear Likes Our New Site!

Our friends over at Josh Spear have just written up a sweet review of our new site! Click the image above for real, (virtual) proof & to see it in all its cyber glory. Thanks Josh Spear & co!

Lyndsey Lesh

Cute drawings, illustration and prints by Lyndsey Lesh. I like her soft-spoken style and line work. Reminds me of crayons, nostalgia, and children’s illustrations.

21st Century Filth

Design duo Ben Tegel and Brian Romero combine their mighty illustrative skills to form the collective 21st Century Filth. Their pop punch vulgar street grit sensibility calls to mind the cantankerous and misogynistic godfather of underground comix, R. Crumb. Check out more of their stuff at their website; linked above.

Interview: Neil Powell

Artist Neil Powell recently opened the show, “Down By The Side Of The Road” at 222 Gallery on July 10th. The exhibition featured a selection of works on paper and sculptures. Powell’s work evokes a whimsical, yet graphic approach—appearing as indexical maps of personal narrative or scatological documentations. His illustrative worlds are littered with idiosyncratic characters, situations and translations. Neil Powell’s show will be up at 222 Gallery until August 1st.