Things That Exist


The Things That Exist from Beautiful/Decay Magazine on Vimeo.

Edwin Wurm Is Not Serious


“I knew from a fairly early age, about 15 or so, that I wanted to be an artist. The problem was, my father was a detective in the police. In his view, artists were almost as suspect as criminals”, explains Austrian artist Edwin Wurm. He obviously withstood his father’s objections to his artistic ambitions and followed his vocation. Good for him and for us, because Edwin Wurm is now one of the most successful contemporary artists in the Northern hemisphere.

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Tomorrow (Dec. 5th) in Miami: Scion Installation!

602_1228431001This October, Scion launched the fifth installment of its Installation Art Tour. The program is designed to give exposure to both established and emerging artists. Installation 5: Self Portraits highlights a diverse array of artists from around the world.

Special Problems, Special Videos


Tame Impala – Half Full Glass of Wine from Modular People on Vimeo.

Chuck Close Interview

Charlie Rose interviews one of the most famous living artists today about becoming permanently paralyzed, his painting process, and how luck can be more important than success.

grilled sourdough skin, irrigated tuna casserole, stretch wigs!

600_1228414846Gregory Jacobsen’s paintings give me a feeling akin to working at a gynecology clinic for several years.

See your shirt design printed as part of B/D’s Apparel line!

598_1228364987Calling all creatives and designers- Beautiful/Decay launches its first t-shirt design competition!

Interview: Levi Van Veluw

597_1228249220Upon first viewing Levi Van Veluw’s photography, my mind immediately drew parallels to the resurgence in the interest in the mask, and film-inspired disguise in contemporary photography, ranging from Gillian Wearing’s diaristic and macabre facial effigies of sorts, to Hanna Liden’s gothic black metal inclinations, or even Cindy Sherman’s self-portraiture. Van Veluw’s works seemed to function within this conversation; his experiments in obscuring and fundamentally altering his own visage seemed like the logical, humorous, conclusion to prior explorations within examining, and shifting, self-image. Surprisingly, Van Veluw dismisses the heavy conceptual framework of the mask, citing it as merely functioning for “religious” purposes or as “decoration/tradition.” In a way, his refusal to acknowledge his relationship to other similar artists is interesting; they become instead private, more ego-driven explorations of himself, like a young child painting his face for the first time and marveling at his own transformation. Perhaps this is fundamentally what introduces humor into the works—we voyeuristically watch Van Veluw make a fool of his face in new and surprising ways, time and time again.