Abstract, Subtract, Retract With Todd Chilton


Plenty of nice geometric abstractions on Todd Chilton’s portfolio site. Geometric abstractions can sometimes be a bore but Todd manages to get it right with his playful paint handling and the occasional drip of paint.

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Pearl C Hsiung


I’ve seen a lot of great paintings by Pearl in the past and was excited to feature her work in Issue: V of Beautiful/Decay. However I hadn’t seen much of her work until I stumbled onto her website today. The videos are hilarious and tie into her paintings nicely. This new discovery does make me wonder whether the video work came first or the paintings?

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Spotted Hirst

Footage from the installation of Damien Hirst’s painting John, John as part of the exhibition Color Chart: Reinventing Color, 1950 to Today at the Museum Of Modern Art.

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Interview: Charlie Roberts


Charlie Roberts recent exhibition at Richard Heller showcased a contemporary double-take on old European salon style exhibitions. His subject matter sifts through the sheer availability and prevalence of, signs, symbols and iconographies present in today’s visual landscape. Roberts notes, “the groups of things isolated on blank pages started as a sort of excercise or study to ween my hand and eyes off using photographs to paint figures from in my paintings, and over time they became a end in themselves, a way to make a painting with out.” Organized in loose, self-devised groupings, in a pseudo-scientific faux-taxonomical manner Linnaeus would be proud of, Roberts draws parallels between hundreds of gestures and ideas. The result are images that look like they could be pulled straight from vintage Audobon Society botanical illustrations. Yet with titles and conglomerations of groups such as “NYC Hip Hop,” “Gang Bangin’,” and themes such as obsessive object collecting and Scientology, Roberts depicts not the wildlife of geographic and biological discovery, but bravely explores our digital, information-soaked New World.

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Your brain on drugs

Paper MooIf a swirling primordial sea took acid and turned to pen on paper, I imagine they’d look something like Yusuke Gunki’s psychedelic oil spills.

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Interview: Eric Yahnker

  

Eric Yahnker creates works that are too clever for their own good. He welcomes all sectors of popular culture, personal narrative, religion, icon and beyond into his studio as “fair game” for his visual fodder. At times, the works playfully traverse into taboo subjects and ideologies, like a naughty child sticking their finger into the socket or cookie jar, at once turning them on their head once again to reveal their inherent paradoxes and inconsistencies.  

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Joao Oliviera

Joao OlivieraThese transcendentally intergalactic images are like cryptic icons from the future. I’m pretty sure this is what it would look like if an alien landed on earth and created a transmission from his ship that beamed down a chronological history of time cascading into future mankind straight into your dreams.

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Interview: Marsha Pels

Marsha Pels poetically recontextualizes found objects of power and politics. Cohesion in her works is achieved though this particular modus operandi, though not necessarily in subject matter. Her gutsy recent exhibit at Schroeder Romero, “Dead Mother, Dead Cowboy,” made a connection between the recent death of her mother and abandonment by her partner. Artworks within this exhibition included a fluorescent lit, crystal-clear casting of Pels’ mother draped in mink stoles, her ex-lover on a deconstructed motorcycle, and castings of her own hands made in her mother’s gloves. For lack of a better word, this personal and haunting expose on desire, loss and morning is brave—laying bare an honest, and witty personal narrative. Recently Marsha discussed her creative inspiration, and her in-depth thought process behind her recent sculptural series. 

 

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