Anne Lemanski Creates Quirky Sculptures Of Postmodern Animals

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American artist Anne Lemanski creates quirky, conceptual sculptures of animals. She begins by creating a copper rod amateur which she then cuts, manipulates, and braises together to create what she refers to as a three dimensional line drawing. She then uses various materials, such as prints created from images of her own collages, leather, and vinyl. These works act as a further adaptation of her collage practice. Her sculpture aesthetic roots from images she has been familiar with for years. As the Alumna Artist-In-Residence at the McColl Center for Arts + Innocation in Charlotte, North Carolina, Anne Lemanski developed her practice between both her collage and sculptural elements, leading her to create her newest exhibition, Simulacra. As the artist moved between techniques of meditative cutting and pasting to the physicality of creating a structure, she began to realize that ultimately, despite the difference in the materiality of the work, what was creating was the simulation of animals. By creating a falsified “double” of something that is in fact real. Lemanski allows herself to enter the postmodern discourse of the notion of “simulacra,” a concept associated with French philosopher Jean Baudrillard. Within the philosopher’s work Simulacra and Simulation (1981), Baudrillard argues that by creating “copies,” society has replaced all meaning with mere symbols. Thus, the human experience has become hyper-real, as all meaning is just a simulation of what once was. Lemanski notes that her own practice replicates the same notion, as she creates the simulacrum of nature. She allows two dimensional imaging to become three dimensional. This process allows the viewer to then experience the simulated, while channeling the real.

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Jennifer Angus’ Wall Installation Of Exquisite Patterns Created With 5000 Real Insects

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A wall patterned with vibrant colorful real insects. Jennifer Angus is arranging the species she appreciates the most on a hot-pink background. The opening of the Renwick Gallery across from the White House in Washington DC has welcomed artists to use different kind of mediums to surprise their future viewers.

The series of in situ installations is called ‘Wonder’. From room to room the curator wants the viewer to be amazed. The different styles ornating the gallery are brought together in a way that the viewer can’t recognize what he is admiring until he comes closer and immerses himself into the decor.

Jennifer Angus’s room revolves around patterns. From far, the general aspect imitates a wall paper. The artist, a former textile designer, knows how to play with the motifs. She is inspired by patterns ‘to which repetition is inherent’. 5000 insects, weevils and small beetles were handpicked and displayed by the artist mainly in the shape of skulls. This symbol of mortality combined with the insects meet her purpose, which is to highlight the fragile features of human kind. Her installation is called ‘In the Midnight Garden’. A reference to the glow created by the iridescent blues, greens and lilac tones.

The disclaimer on the artist website indicates the insects were all collected from Southeast Asia, particularly Thailand and Malaysia. She does not alter their original colors and she is reusing each one of them for each exhibition, carefully putting them away in boxes.

The ‘Wonder’ show will open to the public on November 13th 2015 at the Renwick Gallery in Washington D.C.(via Design Boom)

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Keith Lemley’s Eerie, Neon Ax Installation Explores Memories Of The Forest

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Keith Lemley is an American artist who builds sculptural, light-based installations that explore the crossroads between nature and technology. Featured here is “The Woods,” comprising a dimly-lit room with illuminated axes lain against chopping logs and cracked cement walls. The scene is eerie yet serene, mixing bright-light modernity with the dark, cobwebbed corners of rustic life. The lights bring a sense of warmth and presence where there is otherwise cold stillness, calling upon our own memories of the forest while also estranging them with urban glamor. In the following statement, Lemley describes his desire to transcend time and environmental boundaries:

“My work is about seeing the unseen—the invisible presence which exists in our minds and surrounds all objects, experiences, and memories. Working in my studio in rural Appalachia, I have developed a keen interest in being part of and observing natural systems, time and the process of life and death, and an aesthetic sensibility synthesizing the organic and the machine.” (Source)

Other works by Lemley similarly explore the beauty of the natural world, manifesting it beyond normative representations; “Arboreal” is a speculation on the geometry inherent in nature, whereas “Past Presence” uses light to enhance the ragged dynamism of driftwood. Lemley’s goal is to shift our perspectives on the environment, and he does so by fulfilling the adventurous spirit and infusing physical images with the resonance of personal experience. Lemley’s installations renew familiar landscapes with meaning and excitement; as he writes, “one [ultimately] walks away more self aware and delighted in everyday visual ephemera and the experience of being a living, breathing being” (Source).

Visit Lemley’s website to view more. (Via The Jealous Curator)

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Max Siedentopf Illegally Pimps Your Ride With A Little Help From Some Tape And Cardboard

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Max Siedentopf is a car transformer. He pimps cars which, in his opinion need an upgrade. He sneaks up at dawn in the streets of Amsterdam and with a couple of euros tapes cardboards onto the cars. The add-ons recreate the design of race cars, low budget style.

It’s all thought through. All the major components, rear wings, side pods and front wings, help imitate a fancy expensive supercar. Max Siedentopf cannot get his head around the fact that in a world where personalization and self-expression is craved and sought after, cars are still so poor looking.

Car owners are usually like pet owners, proud and close to the subject they affectionate and take care of daily. They usually end up looking alike. Would this mean ugly looking cars have ugly looking owners? Thanks to Max Siedentopf, and if the owners keep their upgrade on, this will never be brought up anymore. 

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Paul Rucker’s Provocative Artwork Takes Back America’s History Of Racist Imagery And Symbols

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KKK robes recreated, bullets shot on purpose on white paper, a video pointing out the current incarcerations and lynching images depicted on a throw.  Paul Rucker’s exhibition is comprised of texts, a video, quilts, textiles and installations. All with the aim to tell stories that will shock, question and reflect on America’s police violence. According to Paul Rucker, it’s an ongoing process, hence the title of his exhibition: ‘Rewind’.

The artist’s vision is plural. The exhibition translates a dramatization of how the history of racism is affecting our present lives. The Klan robes are made out of new fabrics to strike and draw curiosity. He is using powerful symbols of racism to lead our current society to communicate and debate. His subjects are intentionally provocative.
When he stitches killing images on throws that are originally suppose to bring warmth and comfort, he is deliberately choosing to oppose two major elements: life and death.
In a ten minute video, he represents the 2.3 million people currently imprisoned on a map. The use of different color make the rendering visually more effective and speaks a greater deal to the eye.

Another series consists of shots on pieces of white paper. They are created with a pistol and are named by the city and date of the event. The artist runs a series of statistics and unveils that a number of unarmed individuals were shot by the police. Once again Paul Rucker wants to make a visual impact. Instead of explaining and narrating a story, the shots on the white papers create tension. It’s an effective summary of a thousand words.

The purpose of this exhibition is to make a clear testimony on what has happened, is happening and will, undoubtedly happen again in the future.
Paul Rucker’s ‘Rewind’ exhibition is displayed at the Baltimore Museum of Art until November 15th 2015. (via huffington post)

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Laurie Anderson’s Provocative New Collaborative Installation With A Former Guantanamo Bay Prisoner

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An artistic collaboration between a former Guantanamo Bay prisoner and a multimedia artist. One sitting in West Africa, the other in New York. The dialogue between Laurie Anderson and Mohammed el Gharani took place two days ago at the The Park Avenue Armory. The installation/performance titled ‘Habeas Corpus’ is a concept demonstrating the possibility of untangling stories and their interpretations though a simple dialogue.

Laurie Anderson imagined the installation to take part in separate stories. In a first room, the entire body of Mohammed el Gharani is live by the process of projection-mapping in a large auditorium. He is projected as four times his size in a statuesque position inspired by the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C. . In another room, Mohammed el Gharani appears on a large flat screen, in front of benches set up for visitors. This presentation is filmed as a documentary where the former prisoner narrates his experiences. 

The visitors are given prior to the installation a leaflet explaining the circumstances of the making of what they are about to witness. The context of Mohammed el Gharani’s emprisonnement from the age of 14 to 21 and transcriptions of his stories.
The young man is describing his story, what he experienced through those years; but without being too precise about the details. Laurie Anderson, the artist, didn’t want to emphasize that aspect. Her purpose is to tell in her own way, how a testimonial, an interrogatory can be told and retold and how it can loose its dominant meaning. (via The Creators Project). Photos by James Ewing

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Miniature Movie Sets Crafted With Such Detail You Won’t Believe Your Eyes

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As crazy as it may seem, there was a time when computers did not exist. Before the days of digital manipulation tricks, also known as CGI, the magic of the movies was created by hand. Instead of “copying and pasting” in explosions and aliens, hundreds of artists would gather to create miniaturized life-like movie sets. These sets would then allow filmmakers to generate a larger-than-life type scene on a more manageable sized scale. They act as little doubled false realities, that on film, become truths.

The crafted preciseness of these rooms are absolutely spectacular. As you peek through the models, you’ll find an endless amount of detail that will leave you in awe. Not only are the replicas life-like through spot on accuracy in scale and space, but each room has carefully selected fixtures and decorative touches, grounding them in time. With windows that look as if they have had their own personal histories, kitchens fully equipped with tiny utensils, a library thats perfectly slight disorder allows it to seem genuinely used, these miniatures truly own their connected to reality. What further enhances the believability is the way light floods through these places, positioning them in certain moments of day a certain time of year. To think about the amount of work and craftsmanship that used to go into the production of a film is mind-blowing.

CGI has completely changed the nature of what it means to make a film; something that was once a collaboration of artists and craftsmen talented in skilled labor, now falls to a man behind a machine. These sets are a reminder of how much we have truly changed, how our association with the word skill has moved away from a physical sense and has fully been relocated to a cyber one.

You can find over 100 of these look-a-like rooms and over 300 props at the Musée Miniature & Cinéma in Lyon. (via Web Urbanist)

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Plant Sculptures Reflect Complicated Relationship Of Human Beings With Nature

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French artist Emeric Chantier’s recent series of plant sculptures provides a strong reflection on the place of human beings in nature, as well as our role as both internal and external elements of nature. His series of plant sculptures depicts skulls, weapons, and human faces amongst others. The striking way he has put together his work in both inspiring and terrifying in the way that it illustrates the gentle balance of man and nature, as well as our role within nature and the struggle of equilibrium between manmade objects and the environment.

His work is put composed of dried plants, combined with industrial and household items held together with molding and glue. His combination of materials makes for a very visual depiction of the merging of man and nature. The carefully knotted branches in the sculptures form winding masses of matter in a way that looks almost painful. His pieces including industrial materials translate the deep melancholy associated with the suffering and destruction of our environment and the ways in which we impact our environment.

His use of the skull and the heart in his work also brings in another level of symbolism in the tradition of still life paintings. Here his work addresses the beauty and tragedy of nature as related to death, as in the ends she delivers, and the ends we bring to her. The three dimensional aspect of Chantier’s work really brings the urgency of our deteriorating relationship with nature into the foreground.

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