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A Magical 3D Laser That Projects Images And Text Into Thin Air

Akira Asano - Misc

Akira Asano - Misc

The technological wizards at Burton Inc. have developed a 3D laser display that can project images onto thin air. By focusing laser beams onto a single spot and firing the lasers in bursts of 100 times per second, images appear out of nowhere like 21st century pointillist magic. So far, the images are rudimentary, looking for the most part like simple sketches in .GIF form. But it’s still a fantastic advancement of the technology.

“This is the only device that can show text and pictures in mid-air, without using a screen,” says Akira Asano, Burton Inc.’s director and head researcher. The first and foremost application of the technology has been for emergency warnings — such as in a tsunami scenario — or as signals in pedestrian-heavy areas, such as at a crosswalk.

Not only does Burton Inc. hope to see this technology implemented in public spaces but also in people’s personal cars, thereby transforming even civilian vehicles into portable 3D displays. (via This Is Colossal)

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Drone Boning: Possibilities of Drone Cinematography Explored Through Artful Pornography

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Brandon LaGanke and John Carlucci are the duo that make up Gost + Cow Films who have created the world’s first drone filmed pornography (at least as far as anyone on the internet seems to know). This may have you wondering, ‘what does this have to do with art?’, but this project creates major implications for cinematography in general.

The video itself is not really an effective porno. Because it is filmed from so high up, the great majority of the eroticism is lost to lack of detail. The piece is epic, though, and it is quite beautiful and surreal to consider two people making love, or at least having sex, in a vast field, or on top of a strange construction somewhere in a quasi-natural landscape. It creates an entirely different context for the sexual encounters, which in itself is interesting. The artists acknowledge that the film is more an artistic exploration than a true pornographic piece:

“It’s an omniscient point of view, really. We did these shots in places where you couldn’t see much from the ground, but then you put the drone in the air and you can see what’s happening… I would never shoot a real porn like this. If you can’t masturbate to it, man, it’s not a good pornography film.” (Motherboard)

Drones are relatively affordable; you can own one for somewhere between $100-$300. This means that pretty much anyone could be making films like this, assuming they know two people willing to get naked for the camera. Incredible swooping shots of epic landscapes are no longer limited to the cinematographers of planet earth. In Drone Boning, LaGanke and Carlucci either chose not to rest over their subjects, or didn’t posses the knowhow to keep their drone in one spot, but I imagine that it could be accomplished. The idea of an omniscient point of view for film is a tantalizing one. If Drone Boning 2 is ever released, they should try to remain stationary when they reach the couple. Maybe scale the side of an ocean cliff to see two people fucking at its edge. (Via Motherboard)

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Peter Madden’s Meticulous Collages Suspended In Time

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Artist Peter Madden splices tiny elements to create large collages that are a dizzying combination of imagery. Using pictures extracted from encyclopedias, National Geographic magazines, and found photographs, he arranges all of the disparate pieces to form detailed compositions. The large groups are suspended on a transparent background, as if they are capture a moment in time before everything falls apart.

Madden’s collections create different narrative by virtue of the individual elements’ pairings. Some of the things included in his collages include: exotic birds, monkeys, the letter “m,” fishes, and clocks. They are often formed into some sort of larger shape, such as the outskirts of a giant hole, as if it’s surrounding the eye of a tornado.

The use of so many different pieces and the meticulously-constructed explosion-looking compositions feel as though we’re looking at windy, inclement weather that’s strong enough to make these pieces whip through the air. (via Inkult)

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Artist Creates Nike Shoes From Tree Bark And Live Flowers

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Paris based artist Christophe Guinet has quite literally grown the traditional slogan of Nike (Just Do It) into something completely new. His project is called “Just Grow It” and is a collection of handcrafted iconic sneakers covered in a variety of natural materials. Guinet uses anything from flower petals, buds, seeds, grasses, moss and bark to cover the synthetic shoe. The miniature trees and flower arrangements he plants within the shoe are actually able to continue growing within the soil base. Each shoe has a beautiful color palette, theme and matching stick, branch or flower. These living sneakers are just as thought out as one of Nike’s original designs.

By weaving Nike’s neon laces through these fresh organic flowers, and tacking rough bark onto the symbolic Nike swoosh, Guinet is making a clever comment on Nike’s obsession with new techniques and technologies concentrating mostly on improving nature. He says about his intention:

In these works, one can read a certain dichotomy between the marketing and media world in which we live and ethical values ​​that are dear to me. This is an invitation for all of us to contemplate, to rediscover the beauty of a single seed of a wild grass, the delicacy of a flower, or the smell of the foam.

 

Even though the shoes are meticulously crafted, and obviously have had many hours of patience spent perfectly shaping the silhouette, Guinet often finishes a piece after a day’s work. Collecting the raw materials early morning, he spends the day finishing the piece and the night time photographing his living creation. To appreciate more of his hard work, go here. (Via FastCodeDesign)

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Allison L. Wade Turns Her Own Break-Up Text Messages Into Art

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Breaking up is hard to do. And, if executed via text message, it can be even harder.

In her solo exhibition, “It’s Not You,” artist Allison L. Wade explores the proliferating plague of the break-up text. Featuring much-anticipated new additions to her acclaimed series, “Break-Up Texts,” this exhibition once again draws inspiration from the artist’s own love life.

Presented as blocks of text set against painted and photographic backdrops, the text messages featured in “It’s Not You” include those both “sent and received by the artist during dissolving personal relationships.” Citing irony as the basis of her series, Wade’s seemingly arbitrary selection of backdrops—spanning solid, lurid colors, computer-generated gradients, and peculiar images lacking context—emphasize the level of detachment present in the modern-day break-up text.

By pairing emotionally-charged, life-changing words with generic, ambivalent backgrounds, Wade successfully demonstrates the inherent disconnect between break-up texts and the emotions that prompt them.

While some of the text messages featured in “It’s Not You” are bizarrely comical (“Sorry I have been out of touch this week. There was a snow storm and I have been watching movies”), others are undeniably poignant, such as the bleak declaration, “I knew you would do this to me.” Whether silly or sad, it is certain that, as individuals in the 21st Century, there is a break-up text we can all relate to. (via Rick Wester Fine Art)

Check out “It’s Not You” now through January 10, 2015 at New York’s Rick Wester Fine Art!

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Stefano Bonazzi’s Smoke Portraits Of People Mysteriously Vanishing Into Velvety Wisps

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Italian photographer Stefano Bonazzi melds smoke and body together in his lush series Smoke. These high contrast black and white photographs feature naked bodies melting into the atmosphere, drifting off in a plume of velvety smoke. They feel soft, mysterious, and cinematic.

Bonazzi, who has a multitude of different series, speaks about this body of work in a very compelling way:

Smoke fascinates me because it is hypnotic, evanescent and impalpable. The smoke you can perceive it with your sense of smell and can even be fatal despite being a natural element devoid of texture and weight. I often compare the smoke to the human soul and in my series “Smoke” I just try to contrast the weight and consistency of the human body with the lightness and elusiveness of his soul, that in these shots I try to represent their with the use of the smoke. The “smoky” of the subjects is in fact their own feelings and emotions. The protagonists of these shots express sexual desire, more anxiety and melancholy, loneliness and suffering. These feelings are so powerful that they evaporate, split from the body and rise into the unknown, which in this case is represented by the black background of the shots.” (Excerpt from Source)

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Harry Roseman Makes Rigid Plywood Look As Though It’s Fabric

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Artist Harry Roseman takes the ubiquitous material known as plywood and with careful cuts and placement, creates the illusion that this rigid material is pliable. The large pieces include “folds” that make them look as though they are textiles. Roseman uses a single piece of wood and mismatches its grain to break up the visual monotony; it fools us into think that there’s a back and a front to this “fabric.” The rigidity is reminiscent of a plastic camping tarp, but it’s still impressive at how, with relatively few cuts, the pieces are believeable as something other than what they’re made of.

These sort of observations and overall sentiment is part of what Roseman is trying to achieve in his sculptures, writing:

The subjects of my work are the bend of a curve, the conjunction of edges, the turn of a fold, the weight and nature of objects, the conjunction of idea and object, the way an idea sits in an object and next to an object and the way surface can obscure and also reveal. One of my aims is to close the distance between thinking, looking and making, to the point where it is hard to tell the difference.

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Benoit Jammes’ Amusing Skateboarding Fruits And Veggies

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Benoit Jammes attaches miniature skateboard wheels to fruits and vegetables and send them to do daring tricks and flips around the kitchen. In the series, he has an apple carve a bowl, a tomato splat after a jump, and a cut potato fly over a spoon. The images are playful, crisp, and colourful. He writes about the series: “Kickflip and nosegrind between the pan and the olive oil. The secret sporting life of our friends the fruits and vegetables.” (Bizarre Beyond Belief) Each vegetable does seem to have its own personality affected by size, colour, and the levels of daring of each stunt. The yellow bell pepper appears to be one of the more courageous of the bunch, riding the side of an oven door. If you look closely, you can see a small bit of smoke trailing off him/her (?), which is a great, little detail.

Jammes lives and works in “more or less Paris” according to his website. He does design, painting, photography, and drawing. His sense of humour and great use of household objects exists throughout his practice. In another series, he uses cassettes for various scenarios. One is made to look like pacman, another like a strange popsicle at the waters edge of a beach. (Via Bizarre Beyond Belief)

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