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Big Maze Installation Reveals Its Path The Further You Wander Into It

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International architectural firm Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) has created a life-sized wooden maze reminiscent of European hedge mazes of the 17th and 18th centuries, currently on view at The National Building Museum in Washington D.C. Eighteen feet high and made of baltic birch plywood, this installation offers a glimpse into BIG’s work and their forthcoming exhibition, scheduled to open in early 2015. The thoughtful design of this labyrinth allows visitors to see the entirety of the maze elevated around them once they fully descend to the center of the structure. BIG describes the project,  “As you travel deeper into a maze, your path typically becomes more convoluted. What if we invert this scenario and create a panopticon that brings clarity and visual understanding upon reaching the heart of the labyrinth? From outside, the maze’s cube-like form hides the final reveal behind its 18 foot tall walls. On the inside the walls slowly descend towards the center which concludes with a grand reveal – a 360 degree understanding from where you came and where you shall go.” (via design boom)

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Till Krautkrämer’s Meatwater

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Meatwater, a line of 60 plus meat-inspired beverages and photographic prints, is currently showing at 303 Grand in Williamsburg but its depth may be best explored at Dinnerinabottle.com. Varieties like Italian Sausage, Tandoori Chicken and Wiener Schnitzel have received raves from beverage trade magazines (none of which found a press release with quotes from a “Governor Rose Selavy” suspect) and a writer for the LA Times described it as “the most disturbing thing I have seen on the internet in a month.”

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Queries about the cost of an actual bottle are met with a winking “If you have to ask, you can’t afford it,” but for a lucky few who make it to the closing party Aug. 22nd at 303 Grand @ 7pm, tall glasses of Pork Dumpling may be on offer.

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Krautkrämer in his own words on what Meatwater is, and what Meatwater can never be.

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Found Via Partycrasher.

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Vlasta Žáková Sews Emotion, Experience, And Desire Into Textile Pictures And Human Sculptures

Vlasta Zakova - Soft Sculpture

“Fajčiaca / The Smoking One” (2010). Soft sculpture, textile.

Vlasta Zakova - Textile

“Narodeninová párty / Birthday Party, A3” (2008). Handmade embroidery on textile.

Vlasta Zakova - Soft Sculpture

“Lilith v akcii / Lilith in Action” (2009). Soft sculpture, textile.

Vlasta Žáková is a Slovakian artist who uses fabric to create pictures and soft sculptures that quite literally “explode at the seams” with human emotion, experience, and desire. Her technique involves hand and machine sewing, and various materials are layered and embroidered into her works until they take on a painterly, three-dimensional effect. In addition to her textile “paintings,” Žáková also creates life-size human figures, which are realistic, surreal, humorous, and saddening all at once. Her sculptures include a woman crying alone in the corner, with red threads to indicate her tear-stained face; a man straddled by a nearly naked woman in a hallway, while a dog looks bizarrely on; and a headless body slumped against a wall, its knees split open and arms frayed off.

In both her pictures and sculptures, Žáková’s main inspiring influence is the party scene, and the types of intimacy and shattered states these events often result in — hence why her work consistently depicts despair, eroticism, and/or debauchery. In one particularly striking sculpture, Žáková took the image of a crowd of people, fused it together, and created a horrifyingly exuberant and multi-limbed creature. This work was presented at the Red Gallery (London) in a performance titled Ultraviolet Movement (2013). Combined with physical animation and UV lights, the soft sculpture embodies the darkness, hedonism, and semi-lucidity of a late-night party. The video Nocturne (embedded above), which Žáková made in collaboration with Jakub Gulyás (video) and Martina Vyskupová (performer) as part of an exhibition project in the Bunker of the Nitra Gallery, features this grotesque “puppet” as it takes on an eerie life of its own.

What is beautiful and provocative about Žáková’s work is that she has brilliantly infused her textile creations with their own emotional and erotic lives; many of us can probably relate to the states of disrepair and desire she expressively depicts. Visit Žáková’s website to see more of her work. You can read about her time at the Red Gallery here and here.

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Polar Vortex- Andy Goldsworthy’s Ice and Snow Sculptures

Andy Goldsworthy, Touching north, North Pole (1989)goldsworthyIcicles1_op_592x600 goldsworthy-ice_ball_21999_3goldsworthy

Although most of America (currently enduring one of the worst winter cold snaps in nearly two decades) would like to ignore this fact in for favor of bundled layers and heated blankets, sometimes even the dire cold, snow and ice can provide the tools and inspiration for those who brave it’s elements.  Famed land and installation artist Andy Goldsworthy (previously here and here) has often utilized ice, frost, snow and frozen earth to create his trademark land interventions. And rather than avoiding the elements, Goldsworthy is only able to create these delicate and precise sculptures by embracing the cold.

In Goldsworthy’s 2004 documentary, Rivers & Tides, several scenes document the difficulty in attempting to harness the cold’s elements. One scene shows the artist, braving the winter elements for hours at a time in finger-less gloves (so as to be able to properly feel and hold the materials) fusing together icicle chunks together with warm water, holding them in place while they freeze together into naturally-made though unnatural shapes. The smallest temperature changes, light, and even chance cause the ice sculpture to collapse, repeatedly, which is all part of Goldsworthy’s process. Says the artist, “Movement, change, light, growth and decay are the lifeblood of nature, the energies that  I try to tap through my work. I need the shock of touch, the resistance of place, materials and weather, the earth as my source. Nature is in a state of change and that change is the key to understanding. I want my art to be sensitive and alert to changes in material, season and weather. Each work grows, stays, decays. Process and decay are implicit. Transience in my work reflects what I find in nature.”

Goldsworthy’s process is only captured through the use of photographs, and the often detailed notes (below) which the artist uses to document the difficulties and triumphs of each individual piece.

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Chlorophyll Skin

An experimentation into color, movement, absorption and the body by Lucy McRae and Mandy Smith.

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Noumeda Carbone’s Sculptures Made of Pills

Italian-based artist Noubeda Carbone is known typically for her award-winning illustrations.  Her sculptures, however, are similarly colorful and meticulous.  The Disease Sculptures and Wearable Pills series each include pieces painstakingly crafted from pill capsules.  While her 3D work may exude a technicolor lightheartedness, the medium itself is disquieting.  Particularly in the Wearable Pills series, the modern shift from pharmaceuticals as medical items to vanity products is especially striking.  Carbone may be highlighting the visually pleasant nature of the pills as it’s connected to the dream of personal transformation.

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Doing Chores 20 Feet above the Sidewalk

Artist Angie Hiesl‘s site specific pieces blend installation and performance.  Her X-Times People Chair series elevates senior citizens to traffic-stopping heights.  Hiesl installs a steel chair on the fascades of buildings about ten to twenty feet off the ground.  Performers typically between sixty and seventy years old perch themselves on the chair.  The perching senior citizens perform mundane daily routines such as reading the paper or folding clothes for the duration of the perfomance.

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Nickolay Lamm Creates “Normal Barbie” Called Lammily Who Has The Same Body Issues As Us

Nickolay Lamm- Lammily Doll

Nickolay Lamm- Lammily Doll

Nickolay Lamm- Lammily Doll

Nickolay Lamm- Lammily Doll

Designer Nickolay Lamm has designed a “Normal Barbie,” who has the same body issues as “regular” people. This doll, called Lammily, comes with stickers to show acne, tattoos, stretch marks, and other imperfections that make us (and her) human. Now, before you rush out and buy one for every child in your life, it’s probable this design is tongue-in-cheek, and questionable how much kids will enjoy it at first.

However, it is a good barometer to measure ourselves against. Barbie- the old school Barbie I had growing up- embodies the idea of perfection, one that is fed to children at a very young age and subconsciously produces vast feelings of inadequacy and the idea that woman should measure up to specific proportions, proportions that aren’t even attainable. Everyone knows that Barbie’s curves cannot exist on a real human’s body. So why do we form her that way? What role models are we giving our children and what does that say about our society? Food for thought.

Here is some more about Lammily:

A sticker pack that comes with the doll allows kids to apply all the sorts of skin imperfections that real people have, teaching kids that they don’t have to aspire to or value the unrealistic body images promoted by Barbie or Ken dolls. And, judging by the reactions of the 2nd-graders Lamm showed his doll to, the message has been received with open arms!”

(Excerpt from Source)

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