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Photographer Creates Breathtakingly Vivid Gradients By Arranging Food By Its Pigment And Stage Of Life

Brittany Wright - PhotographyBrittany Wright - Photography

Brittany Wright - Photography

The photography of cooking enthusiast and photographer Brittany Wright simply and beautifully displays the natural range of hues held by various types of fruits and vegetables. The Seattle-based photographer states that she has a goal to learn how to cook everything and anything. Sharing cooking ideas and recipes online, Wright began photographing the ingredients to share as well. This love of experimentation with ingredients and flavors eventually lead to photographing the produce, starting her series titled Food Gradients. She arranges each edible item in rows, columns, and clusters according to their pigment or size, which is often attributed to the stage of lifecycle the specific food is in.

Some of the fruits and vegetables Wright chooses for her rainbows of ingredients naturally have a wide variety of colors, like apples ranging from deep reds to bright yellows. Others, however, are discolored for a different reason, because they are rotting and dying. Many of her Food Gradients brilliantly display the lifecycle of the item, showing the beginning of its life all the way to its elegant death. Because of her subject, you would think Wright’s inspiration comes from food photography, but because she sees food and cooking as a creative and artistic outlet, she finds more inspiration from abstract art. (via Faith is Torment)

” I see food as an art, and an opportunity to do something creative.”

 

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Zach Hyman’s Vulnerably Relatable Portraits – NSFW

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Zach Hyman’s photographs are concerned with the idea of bodies and boundaries and the spaces they occupy. Often, the bodies he captures are nude and placed in an environment that illuminates the boundaries of nature and culture. Something wonderfully vulnerable is evoked by the placement of these bodies. His subjects, though placed in settings seemingly incongruent with the exposition of their bodies, appear naturally comfortable. The way he captures light and contextualizes these bodies lend his work a universal quality that is at once identifiable and particular.

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Johan Creten’s Abstract Ceramic Sculptures Covered With Vulvas Tackle The Ambiguity Of Sexuality

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Johan Creten speaks his own language. He creates organic creatures by casting a rare medium used in the art world: clay. It has been considered too primitive, associated with craft rather than sculpture for a long time. Johan Creten imposed his vision and art and is now established in the most prestigious residencies : Sevres and Medici. (an art residency is a place where an artist is invited to work with the best artisans and manufacturers in order to create master pieces. A residency can catapult an unknown artist to fame and success overnight).

The artist was born in Belgium and is now traveling throughout the world. He calls himself an observer of the world. His mission is to translate the social tensions and injustices into beautiful abstract ceramic sculptures. While other artists would rather think about a project and have it conceived by a third party, he is choosing to dig his hands into the clay which he calls “mother earth”.

His signature are large scaled bodies covered with glazed vulvas with which he approaches themes like the ambiguity of sexuality, solitude as a threat and the injustice of social status. Ceramic was never a form of art before Johan Creten. The fact that he was able to live with the harshness of his peers ignoring his work as art is a resistantce which makes him proud. He uses this relationship to balance his art. His pieces reflect our roots in today’s world but they are facing the future.

A must see: Johan Creten solo exhibition at Gallery Perrotin in New York City this coming September 2015

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SEKDEK’s Fantastical Gore Ritual Acts As A Demon Extraction Kit

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Slightly gory yet somehow charming and fun, SEKDEK is part performative, part sculptural, part photographic, and part ritualistic. The artists behind the work refer to it as a “spirit extraction kit/ demon extraction kit.”

The project, in their own words,

“is a series of fantastically colorful, expressive & psychedelically gory sculptured head and torso images that were caught using an expressionistic painting/ messy visual chaos technique that includes throwing, spreading and or spitting clay, acrylic paint, glitter, fake blood, wigs, fabrics and flour etc.. all over ourselves.”

The inspiration for SEKDEK comes from a large spanning vat of various sources.  To name a few, the project takes visual cues from artist such as Mathew Barney, Björk, and H.R. Giger (the guy responsible for the creature from Alien [which he won an Oscar for] and apparently also the inspiration for “biomechanical” tattoos). They also name film influences such as the 1990 dark fantasy horror film Nightbreed, the 1988 satirical sci-fi movie They Live, and the opening scenes from Where The Wild Things Are. Also the heavy metal band Gwar (still not sure if this band is a joke or not) and images from National Geographic tribal indigenous documentaries.

Extensively absurdist yet clever and elaborate, SEKDEK is a unique project that invites imaginative thinking as it lives between the borders of fetish, gore, kitsch, and perhaps just plain ol’ innocent fun. 

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Tetsuya Ishida

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Like clues in a crime scene, Tetsuya Ishida’s paintings use a million tiny details to tell their story. The note on the table, the eerie playtime carnage–Ishida’s work often speaks of the uncertain union between Man and Machine. But I think the most unsettling thing about his paintings is that the human figures’ reactions range only from complacency to mild concern, as if I re-enacted deadly car accidents with my toys on a daily basis. In a tragic act of irony, Ishida himself was hit and killed by a train in 2005.

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Brian Rea’s Modern Love

A collection of illustrations from Brian Rea‘s ongoing series for the New York Times‘s SundayStyles column about love and heartbreak. Nailed it.

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Michelle Blade’s 366 Days of the Apocalypse Exhibition

San Francisco based artist Michelle Blade has just opened her exhibition entitled Making Light Of It: 366 Days of The Apocalypse at The Center For Contemporary Arts Santa Fe, New Mexico. The work in the show was created by producing one painting every day of the year 2012, all with the theme of the end of the world rumors involving the Mayan calendar. The show is on view through February 17th. All of the paintings in the series can be seen on Michelle’s Tumblr. From the press release: “As a daily meditation on her relationship with painting and with the apocalyptic Mayan prophecies surrounding 2012, Blade’s work investigates themes of ritual and prophecy. Blade’s solo exhibition Making Light of It features the debut of all 366 apocalypse paintings, alongside new sculptural works, as a triumphant New Year proclamation.”

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Jacob Everett’s Celebrity Doodled Portraits

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With your face close to Jacob Everett‘s ball point pen drawings, you’ll notice they look very similar to the endless swirling pen marks of a distracted mind.  The kind of meaningless doodles we may do while speaking on the phone.  If you zoom out, however, the doodles turn into detailed portraits of celebrities.  For his Well Known Faces series, Everett painstakingly arranges the tiny swirls to create huge portraits.  First, he sketches and graphs his subjects before layering them in swirls section by section.  He says of his work:

“I am interested in the contrast between the minute, repetitive mark-making and the highly personal image that is created. The process is similar to mass production. I work from photographs, concentrating on one section of the face at a time. Over several shifts spent in this way, the work culminates in a finished product which is, paradoxically, an authentic and personal portrait.”

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