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Mikael Aldo’s Conceptual Photography Explores Scenes Of Emotional Intensity And Transition

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Mikael Aldo is an Indonesian photographer who creates ambitious scenes that are both intimate and epic. In each image, the subjects appear to be engaged in moments of intensity and transition, whether it be ascending towards the heavens, transforming into a tree, or standing before a burning doorway. There often seems to be an atmosphere of darkness, or an allusion to death; one person, submerged in water, covers their face with an animal skull, and in another they lie quietly as birds pass overhead. Such scenes, however, are more serene and beautiful than they are grim. As viewers, we are never certain of what is going on (or what is about to happen), but this is Aldo’s intention: to connect with us via interpretations deriving from our own personal memories and emotions. As he wrote to Beautiful/Decay: “I hope that people feel something towards my photographs — a sense of connection between them and what I try to convey.”

Aldo’s creative process is its own dynamic transformation, arising from experiences and reflections and merging into conceptual scenes. When asked how he develops his ideas, Aldo explained: “I imagine them moving. Alive. That is how I connect one element to the others. Oftentimes I also make sketches, and write specific details on how I want something to be.” The result of this living, holistic process is a set of images that transport us on a creative journey through inner, symbolic worlds. Here, on the edge of something transformative, the photographic subjects demonstrate how to let go while embracing change.

Visit Aldo’s website, Facebook page, Instagram, and Twitter and follow his inspiring work. (Via Art Fucks Me)

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DANA DART-MCLEAN

DANA DART-MCLEAN

While killing some time online I stumbled across the work of Dana Dart-McLean on Small A Projects website. Small A Projects works with a wide array of young up and coming artists like Dana who work in every medium from sculpture to photography to painting. I haven’t had a chance to stop by the gallery and see the space in person but it looks like a worthwhile destination on your next trip to NYC.

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Sarah A. Smith’s Corroded Gold Leaf Drawings

Sarah A. Smith Sarah A. Smith drawing Sarah A. Smith gold leaf

Sarah A. Smith corrosive gold leaf drawings

Sarah A. Smith creates shimmering gold drawings with a combination of gold metal leaf, corrosive, ink, and pencil on paper. After she arranges the metal leaf that was mined and manufactured in China, she brushes it with copper sulfate, causing a chemical reaction that tarnishes and corrodes the gold metal along the surface of the paper. In the natural environment, this erosion process can take hundreds of years to complete. “The oxidation illustrates pollution, disintegration, transformation of elements, changes, and the passage of time,” Smith says. The result is an incredibly detailed and textured series that while extravagant is also evocative of restraint because it emerges from a process of decay. (via my modern met and diablo magazine)

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Book Artist, Jody Alexander

WRAPPEDWORDS001 I am in awe of Jody Alexander… one could spend hours sifting through a single work by this book & installation artist. Librarian by day, book & installation artist by night, the Santa Cruz artist is incredibly detailed in her execution – teetering on the obsessive – and sparks in the onlooker, a childlike curiosity.

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Nico Ordozgoiti Brings Renaissance Statues To Life With Hyperrealistic Painting

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In the series Paint Job, Spanish art director Nico Ordozgoiti infuses some color onto Renaissance statues. He digitally paints them in a hyperrealistic style and brings them to life. Iconic sculptures like David and Venus de Milo are now fair-skinned with chestnut brown hair instead of their usual off-white exterior. The visual effect is similar to the colorization of  black-and-white photographs, and Ordozgoiti’s vibrant colors are offset by a gray base.

Ordozgoti writes, “When Renaissance masters discovered and copied the hyper-realistic sculptures of ancient Greek and Rome, they didn’t know that some of these works had originally been painted to make them even more life-like.Ultraviolet light reveals how these pieces really look. He goes on to explain, “This made me think about how adding color to classic and neoclassical sculptures could give us an interesting look at what some of those artists might have had in mind.” (Via Ufunk)

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Noumeda Carbone’s Sculptures Made of Pills

Italian-based artist Noubeda Carbone is known typically for her award-winning illustrations.  Her sculptures, however, are similarly colorful and meticulous.  The Disease Sculptures and Wearable Pills series each include pieces painstakingly crafted from pill capsules.  While her 3D work may exude a technicolor lightheartedness, the medium itself is disquieting.  Particularly in the Wearable Pills series, the modern shift from pharmaceuticals as medical items to vanity products is especially striking.  Carbone may be highlighting the visually pleasant nature of the pills as it’s connected to the dream of personal transformation.

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Kayan Kwok’s Collages Of Vintage People Hanging Out In Your Organs

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Pastel-hued and delicate, the body part collages in the series “Anatomy” are part of Hong Kong artist Kayan Kwok’s daily art project “A poster per day for 365 days. ” The scope of her project is impressive—one fully realized piece of art every day for a year. Along with “Anatomy” the categories for the one-a-day posters are “Banana”, “Birdman”, “Blow”, “Dot”, “Hand”, “Letter”, “Loner”, and “Lost.Found”. Each grouping has a specific aesthetic and point of view although all are inspired by vintage graphics and American advertisements from 1920–1960.

In “Anatomy”, Kwok combines tinted anatomical drawings with mostly black and white figural images, incorporating other elements including scissors, flowers, and animals. She says:

“Collage has a surrealism background, but other than that, it also act[s] like Alchemy. Because you are putting stuff together from different places and times, the result is clearly unpredictable and this is what makes collage so fascinat[ing].”

One of the things that make this work captivating is the shifts in scale between body part and inhabitant. The small figures are nestled in, reclining on a heart chamber and a brain cavity. The integration of disparate parts into a cohesive whole makes these pieces deceptively simple. In fact, the blending of content and styles is technically accomplished, somewhat subversive, and really quite lovely.

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Candy Coated Crisis: Lisa Alonzo’s Confectionary Paintings

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Lisa Alonzo

Lisa Alonzo’s sugary technique obscures a dark symbolic core.  The images are beautiful and the technique is divine.  In fact, the technique is a refinement of one of the high points of Modern painting, Pointillism, and Alonzo adds another, almost hysterical layer to Seurat’s Le Grande Jatte, by combining the beauty of Pointillism’s ballet of color with the designer frosting florets of a confectioner.  According to the press release from Claire Oliver Gallery, that excess of beauty, when compared with the otherwise violent or mundane subjects, a hand grenade, a gun, a beer can, is a critique aimed at consumer desire. As a painter who has often struggled with acrylic painting, I was really impressed by the freshness of these paintings.  You can see Lisa Alonzo’s new work at Claire Oliver until April 26th.  Photos courtesy of Claire Oliver Gallery.

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