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Zadok Ben David’s Metal Figurative Sculptures Look As If They Are Made Of Intricate Lace

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Sculptures looking like lace drawings floating in the air. Zadok Ben David, an Israeli artist based in London is using metal to create magic and illusion. A personal mean he chooses to connect culture and innovation.

From far, the sculptures seem indistinct, projecting only a large silhouette. Up close, we are able to discern the intricate details that form the shape. Zadok Ben David laser cuts the  metal to generate the irregular patterns covering the surface. The pieces should not be visualized from one angle. By circling around the pieces we uncover the hidden feature: the flatness of the sculptures. The artist is playing with volumes, going from 2 dimensional to a make belief 3 dimensional structure.

Zadok Ben David depicts human bodies in unusual postures. The individuals seem to be in the middle of an inner contemplation and the artist have caught them by surprise. He is rendering spontaneous moments and delivering them to us. The artist’s meaning behind the figurative sculptures is to question humankind’s place in the world. This notion of presence is channeled by the representation of the botanical inspired motifs, the airy silhouettes and the harmonious combination of it all.

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Watch Unbelievable Video Of Moroccan Artists Hand Craft Perfect Mosaics By Hand


Moroccan interior design company Habibi Interiors invites us to watch master craftsman create beautifully hand carved terra cotta tiles. These tiles are used in the creation of zellige (also known as zillij, or zellij), a form of Islamic tile work that uses geometric patterns to form mosaics that decorate various surfaces. The most common shapes used are the star, square and cross. The mosaics only portray geometric patterns due to the fact that historically, islamic artists were working in accordance of aniconism, the forbiddance of portraying sentient beings. This art is a primary characteristic of Moroccan architecture. Traditionally, a house decorated using zellige was a sign of a high class family. It is not only the creation of the mosaics that is considered an art form, the sculpting of the tiles is also a highly skilled process. The art is handed down through the generations by maâlems (master craftsmen) and is a long process that begins during childhood. As shown in the video, the tiles are crafted by making clay sheets that are ten by ten centimeters long. The tiles are then painted. Afterwards, the desired shapes are traced onto the tiles and then carved down slowly by hand. Each small piece is crafted perfectly to fit within its neighboring piece. The tiles are then patterned into place and sealed together. 

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Sarah Sitkin Invites Us Into Her World Of Flesh, Organs And Mutant Portraits

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Disturbing creatures and creations bursting out from the photographs of Sarah Sitkin. The Los Angeles based artist renders dark and intriguing images that entice and generate space for introspection. The subjects of the photographs represent the kind of ugliness that attracts. She leaves it to us to draw the limit of where hideous stops and beauty starts.

Sarah Sitkin edits digitally to a minimum. Limiting the use of photoshop, she hand makes most of her props. Costumes, artificial body parts, dramatic lighting and projections are invented by instinct to fulfill the artist’s desire to give birth to her vision. Within the gloomy set up, symbols which seem dear to the artist appear sporadically. Geometric patterns such as triangles and diamonds mimic genitalia shapes. Body parts; fingers, skin and facial features are twisted and rounded until they don’t make sense anymore.

Leaving reality to reach her fantasy world, Sarah Sitkin is inviting us to come along and share her journey. Inspired by Jodorowsky and Kubrick movies, she says she is captivated by images more than plots and dialogues. The photographs do not reflect agression or anxiety. They are the depiction of Sarah Sitkin’s unique field of vision; one where deformation and anamorphosis constitute the basis of an aesthetically beautiful inner world.

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James Charles Transforms Dollar Bills Into Witty And Pop Inspired Art Pieces

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James Charles, pop culture and dollar bills. A strange combination for an astonishing result. The artist transforms traditional portraits on bills into random movie characters, singers and artists. He only uses ink and paint to trace and re-write on the bills. The result is witty and fun to watch.

It all started out with random doodling on a couple of dollar bills. James Charles was not even aware of the treasure he was carrying in his pocket as he was spending the bills. He therefore decided to store them in a magazine, using it as a safe. The more he drew, the larger the magazine got.
The mutant bills have their president’s faces changed into male and female pop culture inspired characters. James Charles added a script below the faces, naming or giving hints in case we miss them.
Yoda, Einstein, Mister T, Willy Wonka, Princess Leia, Spock, Iggy Pop, Kiss and many others are altering the seriousness of the symbolic of money.

The artist drew on 5 dollar bills as well as on 100 dollar bills. The value of money is put aside here to focus on the true meaning of a paper bill components: paper and ink. So little and meaningless elements for such tremendous stakes. By associating easy recognizable pop features, James Charles is aiming to reach the mass. He has done it again more recently in Monstro Eyegasmica, a mix of popular iconographies such as The Kiss by Klimt or the use of sarcasm with some of the Disney characters. A series of paintings and collages blending pop culture and vibrant colored characters.

James Charles’ Monstro Eyegasmica series will be displayed at the Joseph Gross Gallery in New York until November 25th 2015.

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Anas Hamdani Photographs The Stunning Tradition Of Camel Barbering

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Every year, during the celebration of Eid-ul-Azha, camels are given “makeovers.” Eid-ul-Azha, also known as The Feast of Sacrifice, is a Muslim holiday celebrated in the fall. During this holiday, it is tradition to buy and sacrifice an animal in honor of Ibrahim, who was commanded by god and then willing to sacrifice his own son, Ishmael. Usually, the meat from the animal is then separated into three parts, one third for the immediate family, one third to friends and family, and the last third to the poor.

During his trip to the largest cattle market in Asia, a place he and many families go every year in order to prepare for Eid-ul-Azha, Anas Hamdani was able to meet “camel stylists” and photograph the art in the making. Hundreds of camels are brought to this market every year from the rural area of the south east region Sindh in Pakistan. However, usually only a few camels have been styled, making them potentially worth much more to buyers, as they are looking for the most beautiful camel. Anas Hamdani was able to speak with an artist named Ali Hassan, whose family has passed down camel styling through the generations. Hassan stated that he can make 15 different designs, and choses which design to use based on what he feels would best suit the camel. The process takes about four hours and is performed with just a mere pair of scissors. (Via Dawn)

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Tamara Kvesitadze Creates Two Lovers, Two Seperate Monumental Sculptures That Merge Into One

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A tragic love story interpreted and represented in real life. Georgian sculptor Tamara Kvesitadze has created in real life the two characters who, despite their love, cannot be together. The sculptures are made out of metallic discs and are moving daily, embracing each other and parting in different ways.

Tamara Kvesitadze’s ‘Man and Woman’ installation depicts Ali, a Muslim boy and Nino, a Christian Georgian princess. It’s a symbolic representation of the Soviet Russia invasion which forces the two lovers to separate and leave for opposed directions. This tale is inspired by a novel by Azerbaijani author, Kurban Said.

The sculptures are 8 meters (26 foot) tall and are moving every day at 7pm for 10 minutes in the seaside city of Batumi in Georgia. If we look at the video above, we notice that as the sculptures move the metallic discs fit together and the bodies merge. The purpose behind this installation is to illustrate how elements, within a world where everything and anything is moving, can be synchronized and create attraction. (via Juxtapoz)

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The World Largest Calligraphy Graffiti Art Is Located On a Rooftop In Moscow

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What just happened last September 2015 in Moscow is massive. The largest calligraphy artwork was designed, filmed and executed by artist Pokras Lampas. Another masterpiece entering ‘Calligraffiti’. A movement blending calligraphy characters and wide paintings. 

730 liters (193 gallons) of white paint were needed to cover the 1625m2 (2000 yards) rooftop of an old chocolate factory in Moscow. Pokras Lampas and his team manufactured 4 big brooms of 1 meter long each that he used to ‘write’ on the floor. During 2 days, the artist designed and producer Sergey Valyaev filmed the experience. (See the video above) Alternatively showing the talent of Pokras Lampas, the huge surface he used a his canvas and the passion and wonder which transported the young artist. The whole team a.k.a. Smokin’ Heroes, risked the possible rain and the potential delay of the paint delivery coming from another city to achieve the colossal artwork. 

The entire surface of the rooftop is covered in calligraphy in concentric circles in a language ‘dedicated to the moments of inspiration and creativity’. The aesthetic and the style is close to artist Retna’s work which, at a smaller scale, also covers walls. The cursive letters and the urban locations used by artists who calligraphy create a modern approach to a traditional art. Behind the performance, there’s a desire to trigger visual excitement for the eyes.

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Melissa Smyth Powerfully Juxtaposes Self Portraits, Bob Dylan Lyrics, And Texts From Her Rapist

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Melissa Smyth’s photo series, Lay Lady Lay, portrays a set of eighteen self portraits taken with Fujifilm FP-100C instant film. Each picture is preluded by lines from Bob Dylan’s classic love song, Lay Lady Lay, and subtitled with text messages from her rapist. At first glance, her images seem like whimsical coming of age depictions of confused and painful love. Yet, while further committing to the work and understanding each image within its context, the series begins to unravel a intricate, subdued truth. There is a raw honesty that allows the viewer to enter into a realm of undeniable complexity. The work almost allows the viewer to follow a stream of psychosis and true disillusionment as he or she grasps the words written by the rapist. While entering back into the portraits, the viewer must then re-imagine those words not just from him, but then through her, who, despite being the victim, has been forced to address blame. There is a constant shift of consciousness in the work, truly getting to the heart of an endlessly difficult subject. Even further, Bob Dylan’s Lay Lady Lay,  allows her to illustrate another layer of convolution. When re-appropriated into this series, the love song begins to take on new meaning. Through the isolation of the lines, a subtle forcefulness is revealed, noting that there is a dark, perhaps unspoken, overlap between love and obsession.

Melissa Smyth‘s series acts as a genuine representation of a deeply complicated issue, that regrettably, is not uncommon and often not spoken about. She uses her work not only as a means to create a discourse on the topic, but also as a means for self recovery and empowerment. She states;

“I use photography to understand and express the ways in which looking and desiring can make an object of the body, and the ways in which images can be used to resist this. To photograph my own body allows me to not only reclaim control over my self-image, but also to comment upon the objectification that occurs though forceful violence and emotional manipulation. The project ultimately is not about my rapist’s actions, but about my strength and growth. I’ve been inspired by other survivors of sexual abuse and gender-based violence, and hope to add to the voices speaking in solidarity and in strength for all of our liberation.”


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