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A Temple Of Love Built Out Of Neon Colors, Geometric Patterns And Bold Typography

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If the Beatles were right and all you need is love, I’ll take Morag Myerscough and Luke Morgan’s version thank you very much. Built for the Festival of Love held in Southbank Centre, London (June 28 – August 31, 2014), The Temple of Agape is a visual feast. Neon colors, geometric patterns, and bold typography combine to make love a vibrant, exciting place to be.

The structures are inspired by those encountered by Myerscough in India and elsewhere in Asia where bamboo is used extensively for scaffolding as well as the Watts Towers in LA. The vibrant colours and handpainted lettering are similarly inspired.

Much of the success of the design is due to the restraint shown by Myerscough and Morgan, which may seem counterintuitive when looking at the riotous structure. Look closer, though, and you’ll see that there is one typeface and one type treatment. The color palette is strictly controlled, a neon rainbow, plus pink, black, and white. All of the shapes are simple and geometric; even the counters of the letters are removed, streamlining the shapes of the letters. Minimizing the design elements allows the installation to be ebullient but not overwhelming.

The Festival celebrates the legalization of Same Sex Couple Act by choosing seven Greek words describing love. Myerscough and Morgan’s were given Agape, a spiritual, selfless love; the love of humanity. Their temple represents the power of love to conquer hate.

“The Temple stands proud like a peacock with its giant Martin Luther King quote, expressing the power of love to the world,” say Myerscough and Morgan. “Inside its heart is calm and dappled with light for contemplating complex emotions, a place that can transform with Love expressed within.”

This is a temporary construction, which is a shame. The world could use more love, especially when it’s executed so beautifully. (Via Creative Review) Photos by Gareth Gardner.

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Dr. Seuss’s “Unorthodox Taxidermy” Brings Magical Creatures To Life

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In the late 1930s, Dr. Seuss (Theodor Seuss Geisel) brought his imaginary creatures to life, sculpting them out of wood, mounting them on the wall, and imbuing them with a haunting realism by incorporating real animal parts. The remains of deceased animals came from his father’s workplace, the Forest Park Zoo.

After their construction, the creatures, bearing delightful names like the “Andulovian Grackler” and the “Two Horned Drouberhannis,” were sold as a collection under the title “Collection of Unorthodox Taxidermy.” After living in a child’s bedroom, the pieces were retired to an old barn and resold in 2004. The Chase Group later made resin copies of many of the works. Some of these pieces are available for sale on eBay.

Each sculpture stays true to Seuss’s touchingly earnest connection with the imaginative realm of childhood. The animals, though mounted on a wall, maintain a poignant emotive ability; the marriage of raised brows and mellow smiles with the antlers of genuine beasts makes the works magically vital, communicative— and somehow— real.

The profound soulfulness of the work is only enhanced by its hints of morbidity. In what is perhaps a critique of taxidermy practices, the prolific artist chose to present these fantastical creatures within the context of human domination, forcing viewers to reconcile our desire to believe in magic with the knowledge of environmental destruction. In this way, the aging of the works has not detracted from their potency but has serendipitously heightened it; years after the prolific author’s death, we are asked to search these faded faces for indicators of bestial personalities and traces of the beloved artist’s hand. Take a look. (via This is Colossal and the world’s best ever)

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Artists Who Look Like Their Work by Paul Wagenblast

Paul Wagenblast’s portraits of artists who resemble their artwork. Clever and very true.

 

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Christian Zanotto’s Religious Iconography Remixed – NSFW

Italian artist Christian Zanotto makes use of photography and of a variety of software’s in order to build a scene which is completely virtual and three-dimensional, to which he gives body with figures and objects (and inside of which one can travel virtually).

The digital works are materialized on crystal sheets, suitably treated, by means of the technique of transferring the digital image through a process of photographic exposure.

The plastic-sculptural result is of great impact, the great panes of glass, framed, become mirrors and thresholds onto a world which, although omnipresent and alive, rarely shows itself so directly, a deep and veiled universe of the human psyche. The “Iconography” of these works is semi-religious, not from adherence, but from the fact that it moves at its side in order to carry out a philosophic-artistic investigation into the icons created by man for his own beliefs, which in fact are clearly shown to us through these paintings in their nature as machinery, mechanisms which human beings have undertaken to build and develop using for their material their fears, hopes and happiness.

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The Warm And Quirky Narrative Sculptures of Matt Jacobs

Matt Jacobs is an artist living and working in Kansas City, Missouri. The thing that I really enjoy about his work is his sense of play that comes through not only in the titles but the actual materials used to create his pieces such as inflatable toys, tic tacs, buckets, and brightly colored enamels.  In many pieces Jacobs uses juxtaposing materials almost as a means to test the limits of the materials itself.  An example of this is in his “Don’t Worry. I Won’t Hurt You. I Only Want You to Have Some Fun” in which he balanced cinder blocks 9 feet high and stuffed pool toys through the openings implying gregarious ornamental decoration of a fun day at the pool. Jacobs is the master of balancing objects by shape, form, and color. He has a great archive of studio photos on his website which is worth a look through, as well as his past installations and drawings.

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Beautiful/Decay At LA Print: 2 Tomorrow!

Tomorrow Beautiful/Decay will be taking part in L.A. Print: Edition 2, the second annual showcase of Los Angeles printmakers, dealers, galleries, and non-profits focusing on current trends in printmaking and publishing. Guests are invited to connect directly with artists, curators, printers, and dealers to learn more about the production and collection of
fine art prints and editions.

Presentations and artist talks throughout the day illuminate the creativity and process behind printmaking. With a variety of affordable prints available, it is perfect for those looking to build their own collection or to purchase special gifts for the holidays.

LACMA West
Level 5
Free and open to the public
For more information: pdc@lacma.org or 323 857-6558

 

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Studio Visit: Adam Helms

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Adam Helms is known for drawing radicals and constructing ominous wooden watch towers.  His current project is a series of 48 charcoal portraits in response to Gerhard Richter’s “48 Portraits.”  Richter’s work used encyclopedia photos to catalog the iconic males of Western culture.  Helms is also cataloging icons, but shifts focus to the dangerous fringes where civil wars and insurrections take place.  Ranging over the entire political spectrum, from anti-establishment and anti-government groups to official government troops, Helms’ portraits are intentionally politically ambiguous, stating “The politics are less interesting to me then this idea of a repeated identity.”

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Loris Cecchini’s Relief Sculptures Replicate Sound Waves

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Loris Cecchini explores the nature of structure. His amorphous forms resemble the most basic element of life which is a cell, and with that basic shape the artist comments on human experience. His interdisciplinary installations have appeared worldwide garnering him praise and interest. They have been called visual poetics because his work prefers to be seen and experienced opposed to talked about.

Some of Cecchini’s grander projects have included a series called Intro. Environments. In this work the artist created large, site specific installations with forms that look similar to broken tree branches, natural sponges and cell structures. He placed these organic items randomly throughout a space and attached them to electric power lines, on trees or connected to flying wires. The impression here is that life is all around us. Even if we cannot see it we should always be conscious that something is growing and living nearby.

Another piece called Extruding Bodies created wall relief structures studying sound waves. These visual vibrations appeared to be moving and in some cases ear forms could be seen within the structure. Putting the pieces directly in the wall allowed for an optical illusion to occur which turned cinematic. Since sound waves are invisible the attempt to give the viewer an idea what they might look like is the type of question Cecchini answers and why his work is significant.

The artist was recently commissioned to design a class one watch for Chaumet. Only 300 of the special edition were made and the exclusive jewelry company used one of his wall wave structures on its face covered partially in diamonds. (via fubiz.net)

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