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The Original Video Pizza

video pizza spence & ziggyAre you ready for love?  Are you prepared for savage, unbridled, intense, ultra mega romance?  Then you might be suave enough to handle this “one of a kind way to spend the evening.”  Photographer Robbie Augspurger (who was featured in Book 3) sent us a DVD of The Original Video Pizza.  Needless to say, Ziggy and I were excited to enjoy “the soothing sound of sizzling” in a pizza-filled hour of pure retro rawness.   The DVD case is just as amazing as the actual video, featuring a quote from Rope McCord, who simply states that he loves pizza movies.  Not only does Video Pizza add “the perfect ambience to any party experience” but also, there are “no pizza boxes to clean up” and “no waiting for it to be ready”.  The party of a lifetime is waiting for you… after the jump.

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Matthew Woodward’s Decaying Drawings

Matthew Woodward’s large scale drawings are truly examples of “beautiful decay” with violently drawn, torn, erased, and collaged decorative motifs that one would find on old industrial buildings of yesteryear. These floral and elaborate patterns and flourishes are taken through an intense process of aging where Woodward attacks the surface like an artistic jackhammer mining the paper for undiscovered imagery. The result is a brutal and rich surface that is continuously falling apart, being built up, and of course beautifully decaying.

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Julia Sinelnikova Asks Us if Fairies Are Good Or Bad

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In her exhibition “Black Fairy Egg Nest,” Julia Sinelnikova asks us if fairies are good or bad. Experienced as a ritual site with candles and stones, “Black Fairy Egg Nest” feels like a secret den where winged creatures could emerge at any moment. The primary piece hovering overhead is a nest of hand cut resin light sculptures dripping into the exhibition space. A pregnant mass leaks thin glowing strands and dark stones dangle towards the ground below.

But while there is a medieval and religious feel to the work,  Sinelnikova is more broadly concerned with the distinction between who we are and how we present ourselves to the world. Her use of a fairy as the icon of the work symbolizes the contradictions inherent in our identities. As Sinelnikova points out in her artist statement, fairies are represented as both benevolent creatures who grant wishes and tricksters who can thwart even the most noble of plans. In this way fairies seem to be like us, flying between the light and the dark.

“Black Fairy Nest Egg” is part of Sinelnikova’s larger “Fairy Organs” work and includes sculpture, video and performance. “Conjuring Rebirth,” performed by Sinelnikova aka The Oracle and Xenolith Yolita aka Culttastic uses the glowing, dangling sculptures as a location for mystical curiosity, acquiescence and frustration. “Meditation on Suffering” centers around a glowing square where multiple women decked in shimmering foil move in concert with whispering voices in a neon lit disco. “Sentinel Seraphim” moves the multiplied women out of the geometric world of “Meditation” and into nature where the foil then takes on the likeness of wings.

Julia Sinelnikova is an artist and curator working in New York City. She has had solo exhibitions in Brooklyn, Austin, Houston, Barcelona, and Oulu (Finland). She recently curated “LEMNIVERSE: Vector Gallery at Art Basel” at SELECT Fair, Miami Beach and “Seeking Space 2014” at the Active Space, Brooklyn.

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Cezar Berger

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Cezar Berger, a Brazil based illustrator/ graphic designer, creates these incredibly saturated, bold, and grotesque drawings. Looking through these, it makes me think of meat and candy being digested together inside a carcass of a circus clown.

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Hilary Harnischfeger

Hilary Harnischfeger’s relief paintings and sculptures make me think of ancient topographic maps with a dab of Richard Diebenkorn tossed into the mix for good measure.

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Jordi Ferreiro’s Workshops For Kids

Jordi Ferreiro

Yayoi Kusama homage

Jordi Ferreiro

Andy Warhol homage

Spanish designer Jordi Ferreiro takes on a role often overlooked in the creative industry when he organizes these art workshop for kids. Though I’m definitely not qualified to make any astute comments on arts education in the American school system, it’d be nice if there was umm… more of it. It’s interesting though, to see the sort of primitive forms and ideas presented in the children’s artworks and think “Wow, the stuff made by (enter currently hip artist’s name who makes drawings that look like kids made them) totally looks like this!”. Maybe the form is completely mastered but not the thoughts behind it because the output of a child’s imagination is fresh. We’re just all jaded and hungry for irony.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Scanner Memoirs

It’s Friday, you’re looking forward to the weekend, and you’re feeling a bit kooky. Is this what you do when the boss isn’t looking?
By Damon Stea.

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Metal Objects Covered With Elegant Embroidery

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Taking your average shovel, bucket, and spoon, Lithuanian-based artist Severija Inčirauskaitė-Kriaunevičienė embroiders them with detailed cross stitch designs. She often adorns these items using conventional floral motifs, and combines the decorative art with the practical everyday object  (view some of her previous work). Most of the time, however, this renders its usefulness obsolete.

Severija’s work is cognizant of the history surrounding craft in her country. In an essay about her embroidery, Dr. Jurgita Ludavičienė writes:

Employing irony, Severija conceptually neutralizes the harmfulness of kitsch’s sweetness and sentimentality. Irony emerges in the process of drawing inspiration from the postwar Lithuanian village, with which artists have lost connection today, or from the destitute Soviet domestic environment, which women were trying to embellish with handicrafts, no matter what kind of absurd forms it would take. The intimacy of indoors freed from all tensions is the essence of coziness, that is crystallized in Severija’s works as cross stitch embroidery on various household utensils not intended for it.

 

The artist’s portfolio goes beyond floral arrangements. It has a sense of humor, as she embroiders trompe l’oeil cigarettes in an ashtray, the reflection of a mouth on a spoon, and fruit in a bowl. In addition to its meticulousness and amusement, it also blurs the lines of gendered objects, as she stitches “girly” flowers in to “manly” car parts. (Via Colossal)

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