Get Social:

Alexandre Ciancio’s Nostalgic-Tinged Collages

ciancio-alexandre2 ciancio-alexandre4

For a trained architect, Alexandre Ciancio has taken an unexpected step in what to negate with his collage work series, Walkabout. By removing buildings, objects and landscape from the majority of his works, Ciancio manipulates the image so that the people photographed become objects themselves, a new visual architecture based on space, place and environment.

The Walkabout collages keep the black and white photographic qualities of an often wholesome, idealized past, and replace negative space with a soft pastel pallete, reminiscent of the same era. Depth is simultaneously given a flat quality, while figures are given a new background and environment, of their own creation. Ciancio poetically describes the series

“A walkabout, ie a multitude of people gathered in one place can be characterized by a container (location) and content (the crowd). With this definition it is thus possible to establish rules of the game: design images where all the spatial data are erased in favour of flat colours highlighting the different crowds and their relationship to space.

This rule is applied with six old black and white photographs, the various inhabitants of the images are highlighted by the lack of spatial information and the bright colours used to give depth to the images while giving them a degree of internal consistency .

These images are assembled diptych opponent whenever a frontal pose to pose in perspective. This dualism invites us into the image space and observe each of their people, their expressions, their eyes…”  (via mutantspace and the jealous curator)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

ERWAN FROTIN

 

Erwan Frotin’s STRANGERS series captures the flowers of Hyères (Flora Olbiensis), the dramatic and highly specialized world of plants in the region around the Villa Noailles—known as a birthplace of Surrealism—and pictures them in a fresh and invigorating way with closer ties to portraiture than a biological cataloguing of species His is a contemporary take on the genre of still life, fusing organic and inorganic materials to form unexpected results. In these images, one truly comprehends the flower as the perfect union of form and function.

The flowers of Hyères are magnified and recorded carefully by Frotin’s camera. Only one plant ever occupies the frame, and each individual plant’s colors and shapes are heightened with the use of vividly colored graduated backgrounds that glow and pulse with energy. The recontextualization of the flowers momentarily confounds but then becomes clear to the viewer, evoking a feeling Freud described as “strange strangeness.” Removed from their natural matrix, isolated in an artificial field of color and captured for posterity, Frotin’s flowers are the converse of traditional notions of their ephemeral beauty in nature.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Bert Löeschner’s Lawn Chair Art

Bert Löeschner among the artists with the spirit of animators who anthropomorphically instill life in the objects they choose. His object of choice is the ever-present and thereby invisible lawn chair. Löschner uses them to make charming characters and sculptures of equally ubiquitous objects– lovers, vagabonds, pedestrians, swingsets, etc. Next time you’re bored or down, just anthropomorphize the objects and plants around you and the world will be a much friendlier place. (via)

Currently Trending

Aline Smithson’s Photographs Of An Awkward Little Doll Capture The Pain Of Adolescence

2861

When the photographer Aline Smithson found an old, discarded doll from the 1970s, she was touched by his seeming unlovability; his bald head and uncannily wizened features made him unsuitable for most children. Like a lost boy, pitied for his strangeness, the doll found a home behind the artist’s camera. In rich and moody gray tones, Smithson constructs a visual narrative of poignant self-discovery, titled The Lonesome Doll.

The doll’s distinctively his floppy, childlike body works in tension with the firm face of an older man; in choosing to shoot him in black and white, Smithson heightens this drama, creating a dreamy, nostalgic atmosphere. The doll, no longer a boy and not yet a man, exists in a anxious state of perpetual adolescence; where he sits bolt upright in his bed as if woken by a child’s nightmare and dressed in a footed onesie, he also cautiously explores his sexuality, his oversized fingers grazing the shining nude body of another doll. Similarly, he submits to the caresses of a disheveled barbie.

Smithson’s doll is touchingly outcast by his own awkward existence; more mature than his companion toys, he must act out his fantasies with smaller, less ornate dolls, pressing their lips together, his wide-set eyes spit between each figure. He’s too small for the dollhouse, weighty for the clothesline. This strange adolescent is woefully confused, just verging on the point self-awareness. When stuck in a washing machine, he pleads for release, his stunned face reflected in the floor below. Take a look.

Smithson has created from these images a beautiful book that tells a poignant story of hope and love. She is currently looking for a publisher.

Currently Trending

Experimental Japan


Experimental Japan from Dave Lee on Vimeo.

Don’t know much about this video but i like it. Video by Dave Lee, music by Herrmutt Lobby.

Currently Trending

Ines Kozic Weaves Modern Fairy Tales In Her Macabre Photographs

Ines Kozic - Photography

Ines Kozic - Photography

Macabre Photography

Macabre Photography

Photographer Ines Kozic captures modern fairy tales decorated with bone and hair. The mood is contemplative, with a subtler flavor of body horror as her fair-haired women spin their hair into thick braids and pose with ruby-red lips and a court of insects. There’s also a sense of playfulness: a woman painting with her hair in an Escheresque exercise of physics; a man’s beard woven into a basket.

According to her artist’s statement, Kozic’s work is “a reflection on the body’s ornamentation, post-mortem photography and fairy tales’s world.” Her inspiration from photography of the recently deceased in repose is especially clear in the photos where her subjects wear garlands of delicate bone.

The ever-present sense of solitude in her photography make it seem as though everyone is frozen in time. The result is an unsettling mix of beauty and the kind of disquieting daydreams that one might find in a languishing surburbia. Her subjects perform everyday chores — sewing, weaving — but with surreal objects, bedecking themselves with beetles instead of jewels.

If, as Kozic says, she’s searching for “macabre poetry,” then she’s certainly found it. (via Yatzer)

Currently Trending

Diana Al-Hadid

picture-5

Diana Al-Hadid’s transfixing sculptures remind me of the point in the Neverending Story where the white light castle slowly begins to disintegrate from the Nothing, as well as the prison in Lord of the Rings Gandalf is kept in. I think it’s because her sculptures are somewhat mystical, doomed to deconstruct and somehow seem in the process of changing, growing, or collapsing- possible only in some sort of imagined fantasy space. Although here they are, despite all odds, as if teleported from a strange alternate universe of kings and mages and black wizards….

 

Currently Trending

Living on a Dollar a Day Gives Poverty A Human Face

Labone, 27, takes a moment to hold her young daughter Nupur, 1, who was fathered by a client, before she has to return to her evening’s work in a brothel in Jessore, Bangladesh. © Renée C. Byer

Labone, 27, takes a moment to hold her young daughter Nupur, 1, who was fathered by a client, before she has to return to her evening’s work in a brothel in Jessore, Bangladesh. PHOTOGRAPH COPYRIGHT ©RENÉE C. BYER

Jestina Koko, 25, with her daughter Satta Quaye, 5. Crippled since the age of three, she depends on her arms to lift and drag herself. She survives by doing laundry for others, selling cookies on the street, and begging in Monrovia, Liberia. Both of them suffer from malaria. She wishes for a wheel chair, a private room to live in and for her daughter to go to school. They sleep in the hallway of a home that has no electric, toilet or running water and own nothing. © Renée C. Byer

Jestina Koko, 25, with her daughter Satta Quaye, 5. Crippled since the age of three, she depends on her arms to lift and drag herself. She survives by doing laundry for others, selling cookies on the street, and begging in Monrovia, Liberia. Both of them suffer from malaria. She wishes for a wheel chair, a private room to live in and for her daughter to go to school. They sleep in the hallway of a home that has no electric, toilet or running water and own nothing. PHOTOGRAPH COPYRIGHT ©RENÉE C. BYER

Four-year-old Ana-Maria Tudor, above, stands in the light of her doorway in Bucharest, Romania, hoping for a miracle as her family faces eviction from the only home they have ever had. Her father recently had a gall bladder surgery that resulted in an infection and left him unable to work. The one room they live in has no bathroom or running water. PHOTOGRAPH COPYRIGHT ©RENÉE C. BYER

Four-year-old Ana-Maria Tudor, above, stands in the light of her doorway in Bucharest, Romania, hoping for a miracle as her family faces eviction from the only home they have ever had. Her father recently had a gall bladder surgery that resulted in an infection and left him unable to work. The one room they live in has no bathroom or running water. PHOTOGRAPH COPYRIGHT ©RENÉE C. BYER

In the Charan slum settlement of northern India, Kalpana, 20, starves one of her children Sangeeta, 2, while her sister Sarita, 5-months-old, right, sleeps in comfort, above right, in her mother's arms. Sangeeta only weighs 9 pounds. Children are more likely to appeal to the sympathy of those inclined to give to beggars, so those who beg use children for this purpose. Worse, sometimes as in this case a child is staved and carried about by the child’s parent while she begs on the streets or rented out to another beggar to be used as an object of sympathy in the hope of generating more income over the course of a given day. Sometimes these “extra funds” are used to feed other children, thus, in practice, one child is sacrificed for he sake of others. Sangeeta has since been helped by the Tong-Len Charitable Trust’s mobile medical clinic at the Charan slum settlement, Dharamsala, India. But according to the World Bank 19,000 children die a day from preventable causes. © Renée C. Byer

In the Charan slum settlement of northern India, Kalpana, 20, starves one of her children Sangeeta, 2, while her sister Sarita, 5-months-old, right, sleeps in comfort, above right, in her mother’s arms. Sangeeta only weighs 9 pounds. Children are more likely to appeal to the sympathy of those inclined to give to beggars, so those who beg use children for this purpose. Worse, sometimes as in this case a child is staved and carried about by the child’s parent while she begs on the streets or rented out to another beggar to be used as an object of sympathy in the hope of generating more income over the course of a given day. Sometimes these “extra funds” are used to feed other children, thus, in practice, one child is sacrificed for he sake of others. Sangeeta has since been helped by the Tong-Len Charitable Trust’s mobile medical clinic at the Charan slum settlement, Dharamsala, India. But according to the World Bank 19,000 children die a day from preventable causes. PHOTOGRAPH COPYRIGHT ©RENÉE C. BYER

Living on a Dollar a Day is a collection of photographs dedicated to taking a closer, personal look at the shocking poverty and hunger that millions go through every day. The book is a collaboration between author Thomas A. Nazario, founder of The Forgotten International, and Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Renée C. Byer.

In an interview with Mother Jones, Nazario explains the impetus for the book: “I was tired of spending time with people on the street all over the world who had simply been forgotten—by their families, by their village, and by whatever communities they might be associated with.”

The photographs in “Living on a Dollar a Day” aren’t just snapshots; they are part of a continuing story. Nazario and Byer are careful to include a snippet of their subjects’ lives, closing the distance in a personal and intimate way.

“Why does it take a typhoon or an earthquake to wake up people to the truth that far more people die of poverty every day?” Nazario asks.

Living on a Dollar a Day is available on Amazon.

Currently Trending