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Next Day Flyers Presents: Aysha Banos

20 year old photographer Aysha Banos creates photographs based upon personal experiences; a recreation of metaphoric events or incidents that are visual memories from the past and present.

For quality brochure printing, check out Next Day Flyers, the provider of this post.

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David Mendez Alonso’s Parts of a Whole

David Mendez Alonso is a Spanish born artist whose work is out of this world. He separates his elements around the page letting each vignette breathe and forming what I think is a quite explosive finished work. His pieces have a beautiful dialogue.

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Pablo Alfieri – new website!

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Pablo Alfieri, an artist for BD apparel has revamped his website! Go visit it, there’s a bunch of new work, and it all looks amazing!

http://www.pabloalfieri.com/

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Prune Nourry’s ‘Terracotta Daughters’ Reflect Gender Preference In China

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Modeled after the iconic Terracotta Warriors, artist Prune Nourry’s series Terracotta Daughters is an installation featuring eight life-size sculptures modeled after eight Chinese orphan girls. It’s meant to reflect upon gender preference in China through the familiar symbolism of the soldiers, and Nourry created an army of 116 figures using the same clay that was dug up over 2,000 years ago for the original warriors. In this project, the artist also learned the local copyists’ technique based off the ancient practice.

Together, India and China represent ⅓ of the world population and both have a similar gender imbalance. This is because of the preference that parents give to having a son; the number of single men has been increasing since the 1980’s as well as the misuse of ultrasounds to choose the sex of the child. This has detrimental consequences for the women in Asia including kidnappings of children and women, forced marriages, prostitution, and more.

Nourry met the 8 orphan Chinese girls that inspired the artworks through the non-profit organization The Children of Madaifu. She photographed the girls during her visit to their villages in August 2012 and used the portraits as models for the sculptures. Nourry series that go beyond the sculptures and does good, too:

With the idea of continuity in mind, Prune works hand-in-hand with The Children of Madaifu to support the education of the 8 little girls for a minimum of 3 years thanks to the sale of the 8 original sculptures. In addition, each one of the little girls will be invited to the exhibition in Beijing in order to meet their terracotta double. The girls will also receive a 30 cm artist proof of Prune’s Mini Terracotta Daughter.
Thus, each collector who acquires one of the 8 unique original terracotta sculptures supports the project, as well as 3 years of the education of the little girl depicted in the Artwork.

Terracotta Daughters has travelled the world, and now they are in New York City. From September 11 to October 4, you can find them at China Institute.

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Pete Watts

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Brooklyn-based printmaker Pete Watts puts graphite to paper to create highly detailed, model-style cutaways of complex man-made/earth conjunctions. You can get a closer look at Pete’s drawings through his zine titled Everything is Forever.

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Jennifer Poon

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I am very excited about today’s blog posts as I will be writing about a few of my most favorite artists. The first of them being San Francisco based painter, Jennifer Poon. Jennifer creates a fragile and fragmented world that which communicates her personal experiences, race, social identity, sexuality, etc. Her paintings always has a way of having me reflect on my relationship to the world and those around me.

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Amy Bennett Creates Fictional Dioramas Of Memories In Order To Create Her Mysterious Paintings

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There is a reason why Amy Bennett‘s paintings look like dioramas. In fact, it is part of her process to build miniature dioramas of various scenarios before the painting process begins. When completed, these miniature constructions are used as models for the pieces you see here. The paintings, she says, are “glimpses of a scene or fragments of a narrative. Similar to a memory, they are fictional constructions of significant moments meant to elicit specific feelings.”

This arduous process is perhaps a way to reconstruct the process of memory making itself. When we construct memories, we are feeling and living that specific moment. When we are trying to reenact or recall that memory, it all feels distant, blurry, and small. In this case, the painter’s initial construction (the physical building of the diorama) and re-constrution of it (trough painting) mirrors this process.

I am interested in storytelling over time through repeated depictions of the same house or car or person, seasonal changes, and shifting vantage points. Like the disturbing difficulty of trying to put rolls of film in order several years after the pictures have been taken, my aim is for the collective images to suggest a known past that is just beyond reach.

(via Amusing Planet)

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Bill Culbert’s Light Works

Bill Culbert’s work thoughtfully explores the perceptual interactions between light and the human eye. As a disciple of the mid-sixties British Experimentation movement, he utilizes discarded plastic goods and ready-made materials to construct the objects of his illumination. His photographs and sculptures have been exhibited over five decades, gaining wide recognition in New Zealand and Australia. He has been commissioned to do numerous public art works that emphasize light as a medium. Most recently. Culbert was included in a group show at Pace Wildenstein gallery along side some of the most well known light artists known today. Born in 1935 in Port Chalmers, New Zealand, he now lives between the South of France and London, England.

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