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Axel Brechensbauer’s Natural Geometry

Gorgeous geometric sculpture by Barcelona based Axel Brechensbauer.

Here’s some thoughts from the artist about what inspires his work:

Nature is not evil, it´s ugly. That is why we have gardens. It´s like ok, but we can do it a little bit better by arranging everything.
We are obsessed by Tetris, order and man-made systems.

Computers likes simple shapes, so do we. We make trees to planks and clay to bricks. Building cities, like with Lego. The animals think different, with their nests and Lodges.

Before nature was scary, then romantic. But now we feel sorry for it. But does it matter? Nature create shapes and we create shapes. Surely, we don´t want to be nature. I create shapes and so should you.

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Emilia Brintnall’s Whimsical Papier-mâché Sculptures

Emilia Brintnall lives and works in Philadelphia where she is a member of the Space 1026 art gallery and co-op. Her paper-mâché sculptures revel in the vibrancy of the animal kingdom as well as everyday objects. Snakes, Dinosaurs, Foxes, Fruits and Ghosts are simplified and minimally painted. Small yet mighty, Emilia’s spirited figures are a buoyant reminder of the merry and oftentimes silly world we inhabit.

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Carly Waito is Crystal Clear

Carly Waito’s paintings are so crystal clear you have to look twice to make sure they’re not photos. They’re all oil paintings on panel and I’ve gotta say, this is one girl who has surely mastered her craft. She’s picked such interesting gems as subjects, and represents them flawlessly. I’m just as enamored with every new one I see as I was with the one before. She exhibits with Narwhal Art Projects in Toronto, Canada, if you’re lucky enough to be in the area, I’m sure they’re breathtaking in person. 

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Harvey Moon’s Robot Draws His Art For Him

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Artist Harvey Moon admits that he has always had a difficult time drawing.  Naturally, then, he built a robot to do it.  Moon’s machines use the same pens that you’ll find on your desk right now.  However the pens are moved around, picked up, and put down on a sheet of paper by motors running on a program.  His first drawing machine works vertically with only two simple motors.  The amount of detail put to paper by the machine, though, is astounding.  Check out the video to see Moon give a more detailed explanation of the way the drawing machine works.

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Cute Or Creepy: Jason Freeny Exposes the Organs And Bones Of Our Favorite Childhood Toys

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Artist Jason Freeny scoops out the insides of our favorite toys and characters, and sculpts their inner organs and skeletons. Having a sculpture professor as a father, the artist was exposed to the medium at a young age. Freeny was originally trained as an industrial designer, until he began creating this series of adorable abominations five years ago. He begins with the toy itself, and then takes it apart to study its structure and fill it with its skeleton. Freeny began using polymer clay to create the insides of each toy. Now, they are sculpted from epoxy and carved with a variety of miniature tools like pumpkin carving tools and those used in dentistry.

Freeny has taken lovable toys and turned them into something somewhat dark, but also a bit educational in a way. The anatomical accuracy in his sculptures is impressive, as each creature or character most likely will have its own unique anatomy. Freeny gives an example of this by explaining that Mario has a skull more like a child than of a grown man. The detail in each character’s body is so intricate, that it makes its anatomy incredibly believable. Interestingly enough, the artist does not just dissect popular toys like Lego’s and My Little Pony, but strange oddballs as well. A couple of his dolls with their inner organs exposed look somewhat demented; like they could star in the next Child’s Play. Whether you find Freeny’s work fun or creepy, the time and technique involved in his process speaks volumes to his brilliant skills in sculpture. (via The Creators Project)

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Vintage Photos Highlight The Devastation Of The 1968 D.C. Riots After Martin Luther Kings Death

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The year 1968 was a tumultuous time in America’s history, and Washington, D.C. was often in the middle of controversy. Following the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., on April 4, 1968, six days of race riots erupted in the Nation’s capital. Dr. Darrell Clayton Crain Jr. captured parts of the event and put them on Kodachrome and Ektachrome slides. Thanks to technology, these were scanned in to the computer and digitized. They’re now featured on the Flickr account Posthumous DCC, along with other pictures throughout the years.

If you aren’t familiar with the riots, they started as news spread about King’s death. Crowds began to gather at 14th street and U. Stokely Carmichael, an activist who had parted ways with King in 1966 and removed as head of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in 1967, lead members of the SNCC to different neighborhoods. At first, they politely demanded that stores close out of respect. Eventually, the crowd became out of control and were breaking windows. Widespread looting started by 11PM (as well as in 30th other cities).

Things got worse in the following days. Anger was still evident and it resulted in violent confrontations with the DC police. Buildings were set on fire. Police unsuccessfully tried to control the crowds with tear gas, and eventually the National Guard was brought in. Marines mounted machine guns on the steps of the Capitol and army troops guarded the White House. It was the largest military occupation of any American city since the Civil War.

These vintage images showcase just how bad some of the destruction was. By the time the city was considered calmed down, 12 were killed (mostly in burning homes), 1,097 were injured, and over 6,100 were arrested. The devastation to property was $27 million (over $175 million today). Some neighborhoods in DC didn’t start to economically recover until the 1990’s.

See more of these powerful images on Flickr.

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Andrew Clark

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London based illustrator Andrew Clark brings together the photorealistic, the abstract, and the geometric. His work seems to hint at the future, while interweaving what feels like folklore into his intricate illustrations. 

 

Clark has created work for magazines, album covers, posters, and corporate identity. 

 

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Kristina Knipe’s Heartrending Portraits Of A Painful Struggle With Self-Harm

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In her recent series I Don’t Know The Names of Flowers, photographer Kristina Knipe examines her struggle with self-harm by documenting the marks and personal effects associated with the trials of others similarly suffering. Through the vulnerability of her subjects– some of whom she knew and others whom she found over Craigslist– the artist reveals a richly specific portrait of her own injury.

Inspired in part by the work of Alessandra Sanguinetti, Knipe situates her subjects within a decidedly natural world. Against a backdrop of wildflowers and floral patterned sofas, her portraits courageously reveal a tension between the beatific organic landscape and the angled, mechanical patterns of scarred and restitched flesh. The title of the work amplifies this sense of alienation, laying bare the tragically unfulfilled desire to connect with the simple purity of a budding rose.

Gently evoking poignant feelings of nostalgia and loss, this notion of innocence and corruptibility is explored further by Knipe’s expertly uncomfortable use of childlike imagery. In Andrew’s Dress, she presents a tiny article of clothing that for a grown man serves an unknowable purpose; as it wavers in the wind, viewers are forced to confront permanent blood stains. Similarly, a Raggedy Ann doll splays herself almost obscenely in a bed, revealing the words I Love You carved into her chest in red. For a particularly devastating image, Knipe shoots a page in a journal, revealing the terrifyingly pained visage of a girl scribbled in crude and childish lines.

Amidst this haunting sense of innocence lost, Knipe’s sprinkles her photographs generously with a dangerous sense of addictive ecstasy. Her photographs are decadent, richly colored and tonally mesmerizing. Scarred flesh is gleaming and sensual, and a beer can explodes orgiastically over a blissful subject. With relentless passion, Knipe invites viewers into a private world, colored by highs and lows that are equally difficult to navigate. (via Feature Shoot and Tischtography)

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