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The Ultra-Realistic Paper Sculptures of Vincent Tomczyk

Vincent Tomczyk sculpture9 Vincent Tomczyk sculpture3

At first glance the work of Vincent Tomczyk appears to be normal ready-made objects.  However, each piece is carefully constructed almost entirely from different types of paper.  Yeah, paper.  You can’t sit on these chairs or slip into those shorts without ripping it.  In a way, this seems to be Tomczyk’s intention.  Tomczyk and his viewers investigate these objects by painstakingly rebuilding them without their utilitarian properties.  He says:

“Although my work can be categorized as realism, my intention is to distill the emotion of an object, then through expression, reconstruct it into my view of its essential self – free of function.” [via]

 

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Shae DeTar’s Hand-Painted Vintage Images Of Beautiful People Have Obscure, Psychedelic Beauty

Shae DeTar- Hand-Colored PhotographShae DeTar- Hand-Colored PhotographShae DeTar- Hand-Colored PhotographShae DeTar- Hand-Colored Photograph

New York based fashion photographer Shae DeTar has made a dazzling collection of work by hand painting printed photographs. Her style of painting is colorful and playful, adding a touch of eccentricity reminiscent of the 1960s. A few of the photographs feel like work inspired by Salvador Dalí, and one or two look very reminiscent of paintings by Henry Darger.

Starting out as a model, DeTar would do experimental visual work on the side. Eventually, praise for her early collage work led her further in the experimentation of painting photographs.

Hand-painting was popular prior to the release of color film, which did not happen until the mid-20th century with Kodak’s release of Kodachrome. Until that point, photo retouchers used dyes, oil, crayon, and/or watercolor paints to add life to black and white negatives, and later on moved on to paint the actual photographs as well. This process originally served an important purpose: to heighten the realism of the photograph and/or to illuminate an artistic aspect. In this case she fulfills both, by creating a warmth within the composition that seems to radiate. DeTar makes you feel like you could almost touch the image, while complementing and enhancing the shot. Her work draws the viewer into the foreground of the picture. Her use of off-coloring; pink skies, rainbow rocks, psychedelic mountains, make the images spark and pop, grabbing the viewers eye.

The marriage of old and new technology creates the illusion of an eternal epoch. A time that is not now and not then, and has an ethereal presence.

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Zach Lewis’ There Are No Sins Here

Zach Lewis lives and works in New York. He has just released his book There Are No Sins Here which is a 6″ x 9″ 110 page survey of work from 2010-2012. Lewis describes it briefly saying it is a “A narrative driven documentary photography book reflecting the sentiment of contemporary American life.” It serves as an honest portrait of a twenty-something taking in the city of NY during a time of political unrest. We see the push and pull of organized religion and ideologies of faith. Current events like the death of Osama bin Laden and Steve Jobs are presented as a reminder of the speed and influx of information in our current culture. Joy, paranoia, frustration, and hope are presented in equal measure. You can pick up a copy here

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Martin Scott

Absurd and surreal images from German photographer Martin Scott.

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Dana Tanamachi Chalk Typography

Dana Tanamachi brings the art of dynamic turn of the century typography to the medium of chalk drawing. Her elaborate drawings are not anything short of amazing with some coming complete with QR codes drawn in chalk! Now that’s what I call a mix of old and new! More typographic goodness after the jump!

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Shintaro Ohata’s Paintings That Are Also Sculptures

Shintaro Ohata - painting

Shintaro Ohata - painting

Shintaro Ohata - painting

Shintaro Ohata’s painting slash sculptures are beautifully finished glimpses into another world.  The artist, born in Hiroshima, Japan, creates paintings that are accompanied by three-dimensional sculpture.  Both the painting and the sculpture are so perfectly rendered that they seamlessly intermingle with one another.  Ohanta’s painting abilities incorporate light, mood and subject impeccably.  The effect is a snapshot out of a narrative where each figure is the heroine of her own story.  A girl perched on a ledge blowing bubbles, the girl dancing through a nighttime urban scene, or my favorite, the girl walking amongst puddles that reflect the sky, looking up, which happens to be out at the viewer; each of these scenes has a unique story that feels very sweet, compelling and endearing.

There is a theme of solitude to Ohanta’s work.  His subjects, usually young girls, are generally depicted alone, or in such a way that they seem alone, often in urban environments where there should be other people around.  The paintings, however, are not lonely.  Rather the subjects feel like they are lost in their own world, seeing, thinking and feeling things that we as viewers can only conjecture about.

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Next Day Flyers Presents: Craig Taylor’s Macro Insect World

Craig Taylor’s fantastic macro photographs transport us into the world of insects showing us every hair, tiny pieces of pollen, water drops, dozens of eyeballs, and all sorts of other detail that we can’t see with the naked eye. Read about Craig’s process and what led him to this series here.

 

Today’s article is presented by the glossy tri-fold brochure printing experts, Next Day Flyers.

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Dori Caspi Captures The Personal And Intimate Moments Of Disappearing African Tribes (NSFW)

African Tribes African Tribes African TribesAfrican Tribes

Israeli photographer Dori Caspi has spent 10 years capturing personal and intimate portraits of the Himba African tribe, a tribe that is facing extinction. For this particular series, Caspi traveled to Namibia 15 times and formed a close relationship with the people of the Himba village. This village has been encountering a progressive amount of challenges, including the intrusion of roads upon their land, and the increasingly severe threat of the AIDS epidemic which has the potential to eradicate the village entirely.

“My camera was never used as a tool of anthropological or research-like documentation of the tribes’ way of life, but always as an instrument with which I could express my love for its wonderful people, and my admiration of their inner and physical beauty. They had opened their hearts and huts to me and with time, as we shared deeper and intimate relations, they became my second family.”

Caspi’s most recent project is taking place in Southern Ethiopia, where he is capturing the tribes from the Lower Omo Valley. “In contrary to my intimate relations with the Himba people, here I have to build trust, to create an atmosphere which would allow me to photograph the tribes’ people in a relaxed situation, yet proud and reserved as they naturally are.”

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