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Maja Daniels Photographs The Surreal Resemblance Of Identical Twins

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Maja Daniels, a Swedish photographer based in London, compiled the series “Monette & Mady”, a photo collection of identical twin sisters, Monette and Mady.

Daniels approached the identical twins in 2010 after years of watching them from afar in the streets of Paris. The photographer was intrigued by their way of being and coexisting with each other. Neither Mady nor Monette have married or had children, they always eat the same kind of food in identical portions, they dress the same, and they move in similar ways. If they ever go out dressed in different outfits, people stop and ask why they argue- there is no room to be different from each other.

With the beauty of the Parisian sidewalks as her backdrop,Daniels shoots photos of the twins’ interactions and eerie resemblance. Some may look at the collection as a classy lookbook, others may find that there is something quite peculiar and surreal about their ways with each other. Many will wonder about the mysterious bonds between twin siblings.

This addition of fiction makes for a dreamy atmosphere, a bit like a mirage that reflects my initial impression of them. The streets of Paris make the perfect backdrop for such ambiguity to be played out, confusing us with its references to fashion, film and art. It makes the documenting of everyday events somewhat surreal.

 

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Spencer Keeton Cunningham’s Illustration And Street Art Recontextualizes Rez Life

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The scale and color density of artist Spencer Keeton Cunningham‘s work makes it almost impossible to ignore—but it’s the poignant, painful subject matter that makes his work difficult to forget. By pushing around the overly romanticized notion of North American Indian culture as a series of icons, sketches or markers, Cunningham is able to speak to the viewer through short, graphic strokes that hit hard. He’s interested in presenting his own take on the demonization of tribal people in American culture.

Being 1/4th Colville from the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (which consists of 12 different tribes: The Colville, The Entiat, the Nespelem, the Okanogan, The Arrow Lake, The Methow, The San Poil, The Chelan, The Moses Columbia, the Palus, the Nez perce, and the Wenatchee), Cunningham is able to make assertions with his work that relates to his unique position and perspective in this world.

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Ethan Hayes-Chute

Ethan Hayes-Chute

Very cool paintings and mixed-media work from artist Ethan Hayes-Chute. Working out of Freeport, Maine, and Berlin, Germany, he also creates artist’s books and large-scale installations that explore ideas of self-sufficiency, self-preservation and self-exclusion as models for living. Best of all, he possess an incredible double-barreled last name, so of course we had to give this man a shout out.

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David O’Brien & Tofer Chin At Cerasoli Gallery

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C E R A S O L I  gallery is pleased to present a pair of exhibitions by two artists producing graphically bold works that blur the distinctions between the natural and synthetic worlds: David O’Brien: ‘Explosions in a Mental Sky’ in Gallery One and Tofer Chin: ‘Double Dip’ in Gallery Two.

Opens March 14, 2009, and remains on view through April 15, 2009.  Opening reception is Saturday, March 14, from 6 – 9pm.  


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Mia Pearlman’s Tornado Of Cut Paper

Mia Pearlman’s site specific cut paper installations are ephemeral drawings in both two and three dimensions that blur the line between actual, illusionistic, and imagined space. Sculptural and often glowing with natural  or artificial light, these imaginary weather systems appear frozen in an ambiguous moment, bursting through walls and windows, or hovering within a room.

Pearlman’s process is very intuitive, based on spontaneous decisions made in the moment. She begins by making loose line drawings in india ink on large rolls of paper. Then selected areas are cut between the lines to make a new drawing in positive and negative space on the reverse. Created on site by trial and error, a 2-3 day dance with chance and control takes place during each and every installation. Existing only for the length of the installation, the weightless world totters on the brink of being and not being, continually in flux.

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Guerrero Gallery

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With a fabulous inaugural exhibition under his belt, Andres Guerrero prepares to unleash another round of seriously fly to look at pieces tonight @ Guerrero Gallery! Just look at this handsome lineup he’s assembled; Adam Wallacavage, Albert Reyes, Alexis Mackenzie, Andy Diaz Hope, Brian Cooper, Chris Yormick, Cody Hoyt, Cody Hudson (above), Frohawk Two-Feathers, Greg Lamarche, Jacob Whibley, James Hopkins, James Marshall, Jay Howell, Jon Bocksel, KC Ortiz, Kelsey Brookes, Michael Rea, Michael Swaney, Mike Davis, Ryan Jaenke, Scott Anderson, Ted Pushinsky. Preview images below…..

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Anthill Art Turns Intricate Ant Colonies Into Sculptures Using Molten Aluminum

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The owner of anthillart.com has been turning ant extermination into a controversial art form by creating aluminum casts of expired colonies. After locating an anthill — mostly, those of the fire ant and carpenter ant species — he pours boiling, liquid metal into the entranceway, solidifying the tunnels and killing anything inside. The cast of the ant nest is then dug out, sprayed off, and mounted on a wooden base for display. Many of them are then sold on eBay to schools and collectors.

There is no doubt that Anthill Art’s pieces are deeply fascinating. By extracting the colonies from their molten graves, he allows us to appreciate the intricacy and alien-like beauty of the various tunnels and chambers. The species have markedly different construction strategies: the fire ants’ patterns are dense and labyrinth-like, resembling coral formations and Christmas trees. Some of them have long tunnels reaching out to isolated chambers. The carpenter ants’ structures, on the other hand, are very linear, resembling fungi growths as they extend into the earth with central chambers branching off.

Unsurprisingly, Anthill Art has provoked ethical questions surrounding the destruction of life in the names of art and education. On his YouTube channel, the owner has explained that fire ants and carpenter arts are nuisance species, the former being an imported pest that is “harmful to the environment,” destroying crops and preying on bees and other beneficial pollinators (Source). And ant extermination is a common, ongoing practice — so does it make a difference if we turn their annihilation into art or learning tools? Defending his work against an onslaught of criticism, the owner has claimed that with the less-invasive carpenter ants he tries his best to find abandoned colonies (Source). At the intersection of art, education, and ethics, Anthill Art’s ant-tombs are topics of debate.

Turning to our readers: what do you think? Is it okay to cast ant colonies for the purposes of education and art, so long as the ant species are deemed “pests”? We’re curious to hear your responses. Learn more at anthillart.com as well as the website’s Facebook page.

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Christian Zanotto’s Religious Iconography Remixed – NSFW

Italian artist Christian Zanotto makes use of photography and of a variety of software’s in order to build a scene which is completely virtual and three-dimensional, to which he gives body with figures and objects (and inside of which one can travel virtually).

The digital works are materialized on crystal sheets, suitably treated, by means of the technique of transferring the digital image through a process of photographic exposure.

The plastic-sculptural result is of great impact, the great panes of glass, framed, become mirrors and thresholds onto a world which, although omnipresent and alive, rarely shows itself so directly, a deep and veiled universe of the human psyche. The “Iconography” of these works is semi-religious, not from adherence, but from the fact that it moves at its side in order to carry out a philosophic-artistic investigation into the icons created by man for his own beliefs, which in fact are clearly shown to us through these paintings in their nature as machinery, mechanisms which human beings have undertaken to build and develop using for their material their fears, hopes and happiness.

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