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The Big Picture: An interview with Edward Burtynsky

As part of our ongoing partnership with Dailyserving, Beautiful/Decay is sharing Seth Curcio’s interview with Photographer Edward Burtynsky.

It’s often impossible to fully understand the big picture of industrialized development from the limited perspective of the consumer. Each day most of us in the western world go about our business, driving to and from work, using plastics made from petroleum, enjoying foods shipped in from thousands of miles away, without a thought of the very resource that makes this all possible — oil. The impact of oil has consistently reappeared in the work of Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky for well over a decade. Burtynsky’s photographs often soar into the air, freeing us from our limited perspective, offering us the ability to better understand the scale and impact that this material has on contemporary life. It is only through this expansive perspective that we begin to understand the magnitude and consequence of our complicit actions. Recently, DailyServing founder Seth Curcio was able to speak to Burtynsky by phone about his current exhibition at the Nevada Museum of Art in Reno, titled Oil. During this conversation, we learn how Burtynsky’s research has altered his own relationship to oil, how he uses scale and perspective to shape our understanding of the industrialized world, and what lies ahead of us with the future of oil.

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The Film-Like Photography of Tajette O’Halloran

The photographic work of Tajette O’Halloran is narrative rich.  Each image seems stolen from a story in progress.  The photographs borrow filmic qualities not only in its storytelling  but style lighting and composition.  Indeed, O’Halloran had spent time as a location scout for Australia’s film industry.  She’s kept her eye for location and sense of drama.  The self-portrait series featured here is set in an abandoned house in Barre, Massachusetts.

O’Halloran relates of the experience, “While staying here in this environment I felt compelled to create a photographic story of captivity, abandonment and surrender. I wanted to explore the fragility, torment and eventual freedom of the mind  when left alone with yourself and your thoughts.”

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Remi Rough’s Geometric Abstractions Opens At Soze Gallery

Remi Rough Photo Credit: Stamp

Remi Rough Photo Credit: Stamp

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SOZE Gallery New Location in West Hollywood

SOZE Gallery New Location in West Hollywood

Remi Rough

Remi Rough

Remi Rough has been incredibly active in the past few years marking the globe repeatedly with his juicy geometric art on huge urban buildings, other unlikely structures and in numerous galleries and museums.  The prolific international artist returns to SOZE Gallery in Los Angeles July 19th to open his latest installment of work in his solo exhibit “Remi Rough: Further Adventures in Abstraction.”  This exhibit, featuring a mother-load of over fifty new works on canvas, wood and paper, continue the evolution of Rough’s aesthetic, adapted from the mammoth swallowing scale on the streets to intimate smaller works in juicy vibrant palettes.  The crisp clean lines and darting yet fluid sense of movement in these works create a tension in their depth, while maintaining a minimal pristine quality in their draftsmanship.

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Marlene Hartmann Rasmussen’s Familiar-Yet-Strange Ceramics Explore The Darkness Of The Forest

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Artist Marlene Hartmann Rasmussen’s series Nightfall explores what’s beyond the land that we know – in this case, the forest. Through intricately detailed ceramic sculptures, she creates pieces that are familiar-yet-strange. Acorns double as eggs in a bird’s nest that are tended to by butterflies. Large worms curl up in the same way that you’d see a cat, while others drift over heart-shaped pieces of wood. These beautiful oddities examine the forest as a metaphor for dark, unknown parts of our identities. Rasmussen explains:

The forest as a place of enchantment is a recurring theme in European literature and myth, and can be traced back to primitive mans awe and fear of nature which gave rise to ancient cults and pagan rituals.

The forest is a metaphor for the hidden realms of the unconscious mind, a social construction that simultaneously embraces the sinister darkness in which the savage and beastly thrive on the other hand the supernatural, romantic and nostalgic world of the fairy tale.

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Bethany Taylor’s Wall Drawings Made From A Single Line Of Thread

Bethany Taylor - Jacquard woven photo tapestry and fiber-based drawing installation

Bethany Taylor - Jacquard woven photo tapestry and fiber-based drawing installation

Bethany Taylor - Jacquard woven photo tapestry and fiber-based drawing installation

Bethany Taylor - Jacquard woven photo tapestry and fiber-based drawing installation

Bethany Taylor’s spiraling and flowing threads create ethereal drawing installations that hold a keen eye to the shocking truth of our increasing water pollution issues. Each fiber-based drawing is formed by shaping and manipulating thread from woven tapestry. What makes Taylor’s installations so captivating is the fact that each “drawing” of hers is created from one single line. This line creates an energetic movement throughout the installation. The viewer can see where the thread begins and ends, as it appears to drip down the wall. Each image of a skull, snake, and algae seems to be unraveling.

Taylor’s installations in this series use motifs such as skeletons of sea life, skulls, and green and blue algae. These represent the effect chemical pollution in our lakes and rivers having on our environment. The artist is Assistant Professor of Drawing at the University of Florida. Because the ecosystem that surrounds Taylor is so prevalent with rivers and ocean, it deeply influences her work. Toxic blue-green algae have formed because of the incredible pollution, which in turn is severely harming, or “unraveling,” the balance of our ecological system. Her work shows the consequences of the pollution by creating delicate drawing installation that seem as fragile as their counterparts that are unraveling at the seems. Taylor explains in detail the intention behind her work.

Like many other places in the world, Florida’s water is threatened each year by the poison runoff from pollution caused by inadequately treated sewage, pesticides, manure and fertilizer.  The toxic algae created by these unchecked industrial and agricultural practices, is literally choking our waterways, creating dead zones in our ecology that are harmful to both humans and wildlife.

 

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Andreas Kocks

Andreas Kocks’ work might look like boiling tar splattered on gallery walls but it is in fact meticulously cut paper covered with layers of graphite.

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Heike Weber

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German artist Heike Weber creates paintings and drawings by utilizing techniques of heavy repetition. Some of these pieces are purely textural, like the blue ballpoint pen drawings (after the jump), though I think the ones I like the best are in his “Kilims” series, which seem to reference Eastern calligraphic styles.

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Hollis Brown Thornton

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And you thought Sharpies were just for labeling boxes and writing notes on post-its. Hollis Brown Thornton has elevated the humble permanent marker by using it as one of his primary tools in his artwork. Thornton also does some really cool things with canvas and paper transfers, resulting in different variations on his original works with worn textures.

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