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Andrew Sutherland

Luke Stephenson

Glue must be sculptor Andrew Sutherland’s best friend. Objects falling victim to its liquid strength are made from paper: New York Times’ made to look like a from cradle to grave stump of wood, cardboard cut out to create strange optical illusions, newspapers combined with thread and zippers for a lightweight sleeping bag.

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Carl Jung’s Surreally Illustrated “The Red Book” Documents The Therapist’s Psychospiritual Journey

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If you’re familiar with ideas about art therapy, the intersection of Eastern and Western spirituality, personality attributes and assessments like Myers-Briggs, New Age philosophy, or Joseph Campbell’s “hero’s journey,” you have Carl Jung to thank. Best known for his work in psychotherapy and psychiatry and as the founder of analytical psychology, (distinct from Freud’s psychoanalysis), during his life, Jung also contributed to a beautifully illustrated personal journal between the years 1914-1930 known as The Red Book, or Liber Novus (Latin for New Book). This journal chronicles a deeply personal voyage of self-discovery that Jung did not wish to be published while he was alive for fear that the book could ruin his professional and personal life, and that people would think him mentally unstable. However, it’s the belief of Jungian scholar Sonu Shamdasani that Jung intended for this work to eventually be published. Shamdasani points to the fact that Jung’s journal is addressed, “dear friends,” and that that he would often lend the journal to friends and patients during his lifetime. After Jung died in 1961, his heirs were reluctant to release the contents of the book, and kept it stored away in a bank vault in Switzerland. It took Shamdasani 3 years to convince his heirs to allow The Red Book to be published, and an additional 13 years for the entirety of the calligraphic text to be translated from German to English.

 

Published in 2009, The Red Book contains Jung’s self-explorations, representing the source of many of Jung’s theories regarding the collective unconscious, archetypes, psychological types, and the process of individuation. “The overall theme of the book is how Jung regains his soul and overcomes the contemporary malaise of spiritual alienation. This is ultimately achieved through enabling the rebirth of a new image of God in his soul and developing a new world view in the form of a psychological and theological cosmology.” Accompanying the calligraphy of Jung’s text are incredibly controlled surreal illustrations of psychologically and spiritually thematic images.


Art critic and 
Huffington Post contributor Peter Frank considers The Red Book a great work of art, writing, “It is an endlessly fascinating and staggeringly luxurious artifact, a thing of beauty and of magic. It could pass for a Bible rendered by a medieval monk, especially for the care with which Jung entered his writing as ornate Gothic script. It just happens that his art is dedicated not to the glory of God or king, but to that of the human race.” Frank also identified the presence of a small egg within every image included in The Red Book, explaining that “the egg starts to give off light and then to explode out.”

Jung writes at one point in The Red Book, “There is only one way, and that is your way. You seek the path? I warn you away from my own. It can also be the wrong path for you. May each go his own way. I will be no savior, no lawgiver, no master teacher unto you. You are no longer little children. … May each seek out his own way. The way leads to mutual love in community. Men will come to see and feel the similarity and commonality of their ways.” You can read the entirety of The Red Book as an ebook over at the Internet Archive. (via npr and independent)

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Pes

It is very bad that I am writing about PES today, going into his website, watching his very entertaining and creative videos.. while I am at work here at B/D. It is all very distracting. I love how he finds use for any random object into something recognizable – yet not immediately obvious. I would have never thought of clown cake decorations to stand in for explosions. I could watch these all day.

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Telephone Blue- Tonight At Synchronicity Space Los Angles

For their exhibition, Telephone Blue, taking place at Synchronicity Space on April 20 – May 19, Aaron Anderson, Eric Carlson and Crystal Quinn (founding members of the artist collective Hardland/Heartland) continue their formal practice of intuitive collaboration to produce narratives of playful allegories and coded symbols that materialize as drawing, video, and sculpture. This exhibition will exist as an extension, literally and figuratively speaking. Physical work existing in a digital world that happens to be an extension of our physical world.

In addition to the physical gallery show the three artists have collaborated with LA artist Spencer Longo on a web based project that lives on the Synchronicity website called LA Internet. See LA Internet at www.syncspacela.com at anytime and visit the shows opening tonight from 7-10pm at 713 Heliotrope, LA, CA 90029.

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Stuart Whitton

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UK based artist Stuart Whitton uses traditional  media to create his detailed and “life-like-textures” art works. Whitton’s work pops out of the pages and almost comes to life. He describes his work as a direct representation of his personality and inspiration, which can be identified in the smallest of details.

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Joshua Petker’s “Adrift” at LeBasse Projects

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Joshua Petker has taken a leap of faith so brave that most artists would rather cower at their easels for an infinitum than ever attempt. Yet, he has not only landed successfully, but also staked his claim on an entirely new ground of possibilities, which proves that one can always reinvent themselves whilst still staying true to their initial spirit. After roughly 4 years of painting the exquisite portraits of women he has come to be known for, he has almost entirely exchanged it all for a deeper, richer, and much more personally satisfying subject matter. So, when you walk through the gallery doors at LeBasse Projects in Culver City, you’re not greeted by a woman, but rather a shipwreck. A metaphor that ignites your imagination into so many realms that it’s impossible to choose simply one, since your eye will follow the ship as it circles round a blackened sphere with a rim of color — entrancing you into a deep meditation. However, the most awesome and powerful piece to me was that of a monster storming out from behind an apple tree. It’s face, drafted in an impressionistic rendering of fat colored lines bursting from a beige canvass. Joshua Petker has done what many would consider to be the impossible, so bravo Joshua, bravo!

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Roger Kelly

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In the year 2237, after we’ve all been forced to move to the Moon, we will keep warm with these post-apocalyptic future quilts. That is, of course, assuming rumors are proven false and the moon isn’t really the Death Star. Anyway, thats my take on London based artist Roger Kelly’s work. His pieces are not just a random collection of abstract shapes, but on close inspection, fragments of buildings, rocks, and trees all stitched together to create Kelly’s overwhelming vision.

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SKWAK Illustrates A Colorful, Maniacal World For Beautiful/Decay’s Issue J

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SKWAK is a French illustrator who draws elaborate crowds of what he calls “maniacs”: colorful characters who skitter and dance together with a look of celebratory absurdity. SKWAK is no stranger to Beautiful/Decay; over the past few years he’s collaborated with us on various projects, using his signature style to design kooky merchandise for our shop.

SKWAK is our cover artist for Beautiful/Decay Issue J, a magazine that focuses on groundbreaking artists with offbeat styles that oppose the elitism often associated with mainstream art. Also featured in the issue is Michael Scoggins, who draws nostalgic and self-exploratory images on crumpled pieces of notepaper, as well as Misaki Kawai, who creates expressive craft art with a raw, intentionally “amateur” aesthetic. As one of our most popular magazines, Issue J is sure to delight you with its curated collection of artists that strive to do things their own way.

We interviewed SKWAK in 2011, giving us fascinating insight into his art. Featured here today are some of the pieces he’s produced in more recent years. Among the works are the eye-catching, jittering throngs of his maniacs; wide-eyed and grinning, they mesh together amongst vibrant patterns and cartoon images of eyeballs and snakes—as well as more subtly sinister depictions of skulls and dismemberment. Among these mad assemblages are a couple of individual character drawings, wherein he focuses on illustrating the bodies of his maniacs with the same colorful, psychedelic fever. In the past few months, SKWAK has also embellished classical busts with his undulating line work.

Immerse yourself in the eccentric world of SKWAK and similar artists by picking up a copy of Beautiful/Decay’s Issue J, available here.

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