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Diego Bergia’s Arcade Graffiti

LOWER EAST SIDE: CES X REVOK from Diego Bergia on Vimeo.

BONUS LEVEL: REVOK VS. GIANT from Diego Bergia on Vimeo.

Diego Bergia (also known as LEPOS) is working on a series of animated clips in the style of a 90’s arcade game with the help of GIANT, REVOK and CES. The clips successfully merge the world of graffiti with the brash excitement of “Beat em Up” arcade games that were prominent in the 90’s such as Final Fight and Streets of Rage. Here’s to Bergia being able to make a playable version one day!

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Kelly Louise Judd

Missouri native Kelly Louise Judd‘s illustrations are lovely, sure, but they’re also just a little bit creepy. They are the sketched equivalent of having all the lights cut out as you read aloud an old ghost story or dark fairy tale from your childhood. You may be all grown up now, but, still, something in the back of your mind suggests that you don’t turn around… The artist interjects a bit of humor just when it’s needed, though. The Big Bad Wolf snickers, carrying Little Red Riding Hood in his fat, furry belly as he strolls away from grandmother’s house. A fox sneaks a peek at his very own foxglove shoes, and a pair of Victorian ladies step out for a smoke, filling the sky with phlegmy constellations. The influences of Victorian illustration, Renaissance art, fairy tales, and abnormal psychology are evident in all her pieces, as you can see here. Check them out below.  

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Stefano Bonazzi’s Smoke Portraits Of People Mysteriously Vanishing Into Velvety Wisps

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Italian photographer Stefano Bonazzi melds smoke and body together in his lush series Smoke. These high contrast black and white photographs feature naked bodies melting into the atmosphere, drifting off in a plume of velvety smoke. They feel soft, mysterious, and cinematic.

Bonazzi, who has a multitude of different series, speaks about this body of work in a very compelling way:

Smoke fascinates me because it is hypnotic, evanescent and impalpable. The smoke you can perceive it with your sense of smell and can even be fatal despite being a natural element devoid of texture and weight. I often compare the smoke to the human soul and in my series “Smoke” I just try to contrast the weight and consistency of the human body with the lightness and elusiveness of his soul, that in these shots I try to represent their with the use of the smoke. The “smoky” of the subjects is in fact their own feelings and emotions. The protagonists of these shots express sexual desire, more anxiety and melancholy, loneliness and suffering. These feelings are so powerful that they evaporate, split from the body and rise into the unknown, which in this case is represented by the black background of the shots.” (Excerpt from Source)

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Ben Skinner’s Message In An Artwork

 

Vancouver based Ben Skinner’s text based work is inspired by hand made folk objects, nostalgia, the banal, and the inherent history in old objects.

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Merry Mustache and a Happy New Beard!

652_1229726713For the facial furniture lover, Peskimo created these festive Xmas cards that’s sure to bring hairy cheer to that special Mustaccio in your life. Available at Moo.

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Justin Bettman’s Bagel Project

Photographer Justin Bettman‘s Bagel Project is much more than a series of well produced photographs.  Bettman meets with homeless people throughout California and exchanges a bagel for a story.  He then documents each story with a photograph.

Bettman admits, “The homeless in our cities are often forgotten, as after a while they become a part of the city themselves; blending in like streetlights and bus stops, or any of the other things we walk by hundreds of times a day.”

His images, though, reveal incredible depths of narrative in simple subtle facial expressions.  He goes on to say, “I’ve been continually surprised by the fact that these people are content with their lives; if anything, they are happier to have a friend to talk to rather than the food provided.”

Bettman’s blog accompanies each photo with a story – an extremely interesting read that is difficult leaving.

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A Stunning Surrealist Film Shot Through A Drop Of Water And IPhone Lens Reflects The Power Of Simplicity

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Japanese designer Dan Tomimatsu’s latest project is a short film film entitled O: -les amants d’eau-, based on a poem by fukudapero. It is a five minute surrealist film narrated in Japanese and subtitled in English which provides an oscillating view of different sceneries, places, and objects.

The magnificent simplicity of this film lies in the technical aspects of how it was made: Tomimatsu shot a drop of water through the hole of a 5 Yen coin, through the lens of an iPhone. The coin was stuck to the lens of the phone in such a way that filming through it would allow a close-up of the drop of water. The result is a truly dreamlike sequence of images, which are tinted, filtered, and displayed through the drop of water. The film plays a lot with the notion of movement and the fluid, unpredictable nature of water.

In this sense, the drop of water provided a sort of natural lens for the film to be shot through as well as a new angle concerning the iPhone as a legitimate filmmaking device. His project underlines the role of new media and technology within the realm of filmmaking and the process of creating something simple yet so intricately beautiful as a film shot through a drop of water.

 

 

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3D Drawings Come To Life In Eric van Straaten’s Hyperrealistic Sculptures

Eric van Straaten - 3D printed sculpturesEric van Straaten - 3D printed sculptures

Eric van Straaten - 3D printed sculptures

Holland based Eric van Straaten is one of the most technical and talented 3-D sculptors in the world. According to trendwatchers, 3D-printing is the next big thing: in the near future, every household will own a printer that is capable of printing digital three-dimensional objects into a physical object. In the process that is best known under the name ‘Additive Manufacturing’, a 3D-printer builds up a model layer by layer by selectively hardening liquid or powder.

If this powder is a plaster-like material, a model can be directly printed in full color. The 3D-printing of delicate and colored models is far from being just pushing a button, but requires great technical skills. Therefore only a few specialize in this technique and there is no artist who pushes the boundaries of colorized 3D-prints as far as Eric van Straaten.

There is no technique that is capable of achieving such a great degree of hyper(sur)realism as 3D-modeling. At the same time, 3D printing is the only technique with which virtual models can be made actually physically touchable. Physical expressiveness in form and content is the biggest strength of the work of Eric van Straaten: while the sculptures remain to have a certain digital feel to them, the pieces contain a weirdly eroticized corporeality. Balancing on the edge of kitsch, the marzipan-like quality of the material resonates beautifully with the apparent innocence of the scenery. –Prof. Dr. Arnold Ratsberger

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