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Wieki Somers comes clean

664_1230668282Come Clean is… a tulip scented soap by Wieki Somers. “A juxtaposition of forms which represent the old and new Holland…the traditional image disappears (soap) and the reality appears (porcelain).” Via wiekisomers.com I’m assuming these wouldn’t work as well as wooden clogs and wheels of cheese.

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Colorful X-Rays Show The Shocking Intricacies Of The Human Body

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The photographer Xavier Lucchesi doesn’t use a camera to capture his portraits; instead, he penetrates the human body with an advanced x-ray machine, revealing organs, arteries, and bones. The artist adds color to the medical images, highlighting the intricacies of the human body in electric blues and deep, bloody reds. For Luccesi, the act of seeing is active and passionate; a passing glance is insufficient, and to truly view another truthfully is to dissect and peel away exterior layers.

Lucchesi’s portraits are perhaps those of our deepest human core: when our superficial features are stripped back, a more primal self emerges. Lucchesi’s sitters are laid completely bare; though they might pose or strain, their bodies betray secret inner worlds and open them up to a profound vulnerability. A triptych presents a man in three stages of undress: clothed, then nude, then uncovered and unprotected by skin. As he lays with his arms crossed, the x-ray bears down on him, and he becomes increasingly naked, at the mercy of our eager, inquisitive eyes.

As we reach new levels of intimacy with our own bodies, they reveal themselves like brightly colorful and graphic foreign roadmaps; red blood vessels line the figure like highways, leading to pale geometric bone or grassy green lungs in either direction. Like an intricate maze of machinery or a small, delicate cityscape, the miraculous pieces of the human being—the flesh, the lungs, the ribcage— function autonomously, just beneath the surface of our gaze. Take a look. (via Design Boom)

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Dan Hillier’s Victorian Inspired Prints Bring You Into His Fantastical World

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London based artist Dan Hillier creates unique, fantastical prints that blend both contemporary and antique styles. With portraits of beings composed of tree branch silhouetted hair, adornments of constellation filled skies, third eyes, and intricately pattered antlers, Hillier’s work is magnificently ornate. Using a steampunk reminiscent aesthetic, Hillier juxtaposes victorian imagery with moments of nature, creating his own sort of mythological, science fiction world. His work takes notes from the Symbolist movement that began in the late nineteenth century, such as  human-animal hybrid motifs seen in Fernand Khnopff’s The Sphinx (1896), or the whimsical, grim illustrative style of Aubrey Beardsley. While most of his titles are straightforward descriptions of the image it is paired with, there are slight winks to a following of both psychological and theological threads. For example, the piece Son of the Father depicts a man wearing a mask of a perfectly sculpted face to cover a more complex, dark, geometrical entity, in which another face lurks. The piece titled Pachamama, which can either refer to the Incan fertilely goddess, or acts as the Incan word for the creation of the world, depicts a woman made up of a fully starred sky and a robe created from a forest. The prints are both recognizable, yet manifestly mythical, leaving the viewer in a sort of satisfied state of inquisition. The work is almost pleasantly dark, as if they are images taken from a memory, dream, or story that just cannot quite be placed, yet is yearned to be remembered. 

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Corey Thomas’ Spiky but Peaceful Sculpture

After the cut, check out sublime sculpture from Corey Thomas, and a YouTube video of his process.These things are spiky and look dangerous, but somehow remain at peace with their conspicuously calm, desert surroundings. (via)

“I trained as a dancer then migrated to sculpture with a focus on creating narratives with form. Each landscape – and the materials found within – stimulate new content for my work in terms of stories about people, culture, place and form.” -Corey Thomas

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Chromosomal visualization

DNA Radio (German experts on biotech) converts the entire human genome to images and audio that will be streaming on the internet 24/7. Isn’t it crazy that figuratively, all we are made up of are these dots? Here’s a little science lesson for you…

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Special Problems

Special Problems is a multi-disciplinary creative studio composed of Campbell Hooper, Darron Lilley and Joel Kefali. Their work fuses hand drawn, painted, video, animation and illustration–often recontextualized in new and surprising ways. They recently interviewed with Beautiful/Decay to discuss their design collective, their approach, and thought processes behind their videos.

 

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Zutto

zuttoZutto is an illustrator and designer based in Russia. The imaginative worlds she creates are quite spectacular, so check it out.

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Ryan Biegen Hands Out 60 Disposable Cameras To 25 Artists, Capturing The Raw Essence Of Summer

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With images of fireworks, stick and pokes, young lust, and a guy who decided to shake the hand of 27 strangers, Ryan Biegen’s project, Disposable Summer, exposes an honest, memoir-like, catalog of youth. His project started with the documentation of his own travels using throw away cameras, eventually leading him to an idea for a larger project that would culminate in an exposé of the lives of 25, young, Brooklyn based artists. He states:

“I like the simplicity and the well, disposable aspect of the cameras.  They’re breakable, recycled things, often with inaccurate viewfinders, skewed lenses, light leaks etc.  Most of the time what you think will be a good shot ends up awful, and what you think will be awful, ends up as magic. Disposable cameras have a funny way of doing that; their quirky nature lends to unexpected, often unintended, results.”

Despite the diaristic nature of the work, the images seem to blur the line between art and documentation. The camera’s imperfections create a unspecific sensibility of timelessness; they act as delicate, washed out montages of ephemeral adolescence. The physical vulnerability of the film allows the combination of light and chance to guide each image into having it’s own version of reality.

A large part of the projects charm, is that the images, even within the fantastical realm of the distortion, are indeed replications of the genuine. Without the falsified nature of social media platforms, crops, filters, or hashtags, they expose the artist’s summer the way they truly happened. They have a simplicity that results in a euphoric sense of freedom — unaffected by the world outside of the specific moment. They have a true type of raw energy. The type that only ever exists in the summer.

For more of Ryan Biegen’s work, check him out on Instagram or join him tonight at the opening.

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