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Ollie Lucas’ Technicolor World Inspired By Graffiti, Glitch, And Design

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Melbourne-based artist Ollie Lucas creates works where colors swirl together with an almost preternatural smoothness, like oil diffusing in water, with more jagged and hard-line separation. Lucas says, My work has always had graphical and clean elements to it. A past life as a graphic designer is to blame there’. Creating works that span painting on enormous wooden spools, to digital works on print and more recent explorations in glitch animations, Lucas explains his influences, ‘Exposure to the graffiti scene in Melbourne has made me question harmony in my work, I have a love for filthy, dirty and weathered paint splattered surfaces, but at the same time I crave clean, modern, hardline geometrics…This is what drives my practice, combining two visual elements that are polar opposites in search for a harmony that i may never obtain.

Lucas work has often confronts two seemingly-opposing forces, graffiti and graphic design, painting and printmaking, natural landscapes with digital glitches, and blends them together. When asked how his work has changed leading up to his solo exhibition Digital Landscapes, at Pierre Peeters Gallery in Auckland, New Zealand, Lucas explains his more recent explorations and realizations in printmaking and digital creation. “It’s the first show I’ve done that is 100% digitally created. I’ve always used digital processes as a starting point in my work, however I felt a finished work needed the element of ‘hand-made’ to make it unique, to separate it from the mass produced. Since creating hundreds of drafts and moving through the paper choice/proofing and printing process I’ve come to realize a print can be just as unique as a painting.”

Though many see printmaking and painting differing in both result and creative impulse, the artist explains the harmony and connection between the two, giving value to both,“Although I have worked with many mediums in the past I still consider myself a painter, mainly because I still think like one and approach my work like a painter would. I think my work reads like a painting also.”

Ollie Lucas’ current exhibition, Digital Landscapes is on view at Pierre Peeters Gallery in Auckland, New Zealand, from now through March 5th, 2014.

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Cindy Chinn Carves Unbelievable Miniaturized Objects Into The Lead Of Pencils

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Nebraska based artist Cindy Chinn carves unbelievable miniaturized objects within the lead of carpenter pencils. Chinn’s starting material is less than an inch wide, yet using an X-Acto knife and a magnifying glass, the artist is able to achieve intricate details with a charming folk art-like character. Her most involved piece of the series features a tiny locomotive train that scales the whole pencil. This work even includes a cut out carved portion that acts like a bridge crossing, exposing the train to be the full length of the pencil. The work was created through a process of collage; she carved the 3/16 inch train from the lead of one pencil and then fashioned it within the center of another pencil, adding two other small pieces of lead as rails. Due to the unique size of her work, Chinn incorporates a tiny magnifying glass as a part of her pieces, glorifying the work’s preciousness and inviting the viewer to have a personalized and intimate experience of the minuscule details. Her work tends to portray every day and perhaps even nostalgia provoking objects. For example, a tiny Chuck Taylor shoe, a darling fall leaf, and a hockey stick with a puck. This pencil carving project is just a side project; she is also a multimedia artist with many focuses such as larger scale wood carvings, murals, and paintings. (via My Modern Met)

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Mauro Corda

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Mauro Corda is an artist who deals with the figure in space and with objects. They transpose ideas of necessity and will, with objects that contain and hold. The announcement of each piece comes in the waiting for release. Each moment holds and tackles, as we wait for them to fall and touch the ground.

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Oat Montien’s Mystical Illustrations

 

Central Saint Martins MA grad Oat Montien does some really nice illustration work that’s filled with fantasy. He often features young, isolated male figures in his work positioned in and amongst quietly rendered, slightly dark alternate worlds. Also, his stuff is stylistically on point. I particularly like the trees in the work pictured above. Montien, who’s worked with Universal Music among other clients, probably arrived at his mystically-oriented approach naturally. He grew up in a “superstitious family” and is the great grandson of a “heroic shaman”. More images of Oat Montien’s work, including a few from his MA project, Journey of a Mystic Lost, after the jump.

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James Turrell

Bridget's Bardo (Ganzfeld Piece)

Bridget's Bardo (Ganzfeld Piece)


James Turrell is one of the most important artists in the world dealing in light and space. Born in Los Angeles in 1943, Turrell studied mathematics, psychology and sensory synesthesia as well as art at university. He flies around the desert in little planes and has devoted the best part his working life to turning a volcano into a piece of land art. “The spaces you encounter during flight can be amazing: meeting the dawn or watching the Aurora Borealis,” he says and describes an experience of taking off once at dawn and seeing the sunlight trapped between ground fog below and cloud cover above. These words paint a perfect portrait of his work.

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Maxwell Loren Holyoke Hirsch

San Francisco based artist Maxwell Loren Holyoke Hirsch is one of my all time favorite artists.  He creates beautiful illustrative collages with mixed media.

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Izumi Kato’s Paintings Of Angelic Dolls On The Verge Of Breaking Apart

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Izumi Kato’s characters resemble angelic porcelain dolls. On the verge of breaking apart, they don’t seem to care. They just are, and that’s why they are so touching. The artist, from the tips of his fingers; with which he paints; brings to life innocent beings with extraterrestrial features. Their googly eyes, cracked noses and little bodies create an eerie harmony in the painting. So much that we would almost want to nurture them in real life.

As if he knew, their “dad” turned them into sculptures. He made them out of wood, three-dimensional, and as moving as their little brothers and sisters.

All that they evoke; strangeness, ambiguity, revulsion or sympathy is meant to dig into our contemplation on relationships. The poetic landscape of morbid embryos leads to question the nature of interaction with others but foremost with oneself.
Izumi Kato elegantly directs the viewer’s eyes to the characters’ heads, growing out of their svelt bodies, totemic figures; a blend of ancient Egypt and tribal African culture. He creates a bridge to our own head and thoughts because he wants the viewer to develop their own ideas from his abstract paintings and sculptures.

“Painting challenges the world. It is an unnatural form that has been singled out from our current three-dimensional living space. There is nothing strange about sculpture in our world, but painting is different. We search for another world in it.”

Izumi Kato is currently represented by Gallery Perrotin

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Photographer Captures Beautifully Crafted War Scenes with Human ‘Toy Soldiers’

As part of our ongoing partnership with Feature Shoot, Beautiful/Decay is sharing Amanda Gorence’s article on Jean-Yves Lemoigne.

“Modern man has become a cog in a very complex society. We live in a society that praises individuality on the one hand and conformity on the other. Man is an elementary particle in the global mass. The Zentai suit fits perfectly with this vision of man as an elementary particle. It makes any individual as uniform as possible. We stop distinguishing between faces, races and genders.

To begin with, the army seemed like a relevant social entity for this series. The army already has a uniform and a color. The individual is subsumed by the larger military corps. This allows me to put these characters into action in nature. I often position myself high above these little men in brightly colored suits. They can make one think of little toy soldiers shot in a hyperrealist panorama.”—Jean-Yves Lemoigne

Jean-Yves Lemoigne is a French commercial photographer. Human Project is his personal work, stemming from a desire to capture man in space. The series consists of two different bodies of work, Human Project / War, featured here, and Human Project / Tourism, in which Lemoigne juxtaposes these same suited men with emblematic places of mass tourism.

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